First  Prev  1  2  3  Next  Last
Post Reply Year 10,000 problem???
35896 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
31 / M
Offline
Posted 3/7/17
Well, in just the last 100ish years, we figured out flight, came up with antibiotics, discovered radiation (discovered it's bad for you shortly afterward), invented a bomb good at releasing radiation, took a stroll on the moon, began using moving assembly lines, replaced assembly line workers with robots, came up with computers, the internet, etc.

Moore's law refers to the doubling of computer's processing power every two years, but all technological advancement is similar in that its growth appears to be accelerating as we build atop what came before.

The rate of technological advancement 5,000+ years ago wasn't what it was in the last 1,000. Nor what it will likely be in the next 1,000 - let alone 10,000. The biggest concern is that we'll probably continue to find new ways to threaten ourselves with extinction.

We're kind of stupid like that.
47137 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
26 / F / New Jersey, USA
Offline
Posted 3/7/17

official-shinsengumi wrote:

Who knows? Maybe the world will end up a dystopia..


If that happens, I'll be glad I won't be alive then.
2196 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
28 / F / The margins
Offline
Posted 3/7/17
Hmh - just a few hours ago I was thinking about President Dwayne Elizondo Mountain Dew Herbert Camacho.

I imagine there are experts who theorize models of technological progress, but I myself don't know much about this kind of thing. From a historical perspective, science and technological advancement occur when civilizations have leisure time: there are enough people who don't have to work themselves to exhaustion in order to survive that some of them can spend their time just thinking about shit. The three things that deprive societies of leisure time are war, natural disaster, and securing basic necessities of life. Hence the so-called "Dark Ages" in Western Europe after the barbarian invasion of the Roman Empire, and the end of the Islamic Golden Age after the Mongol invasion. Now, in the West the impact of these three things is very muted. Unless there is a widespread nuclear war that causes planetwide devastation, we're likely to retain our current knowledge for a long time. But we're not guaranteed eternal progress, because, well, in this technological progress experiment, we've only gotten as far as we've gotten. Certain problems could prove intractable - like nuclear fusion, which every decade since the 60s has been pushed a few decades into the future, or quantum gravity, which doesn't seem like something we're figuring out anytime soon. But more importantly, there must remain a mindset favorable to technological progress. So far, intractable problems have just led us to think in different directions (e.g., multi-core processing), but for that you need to have the ability to think in different directions. Again, I am not an expert in this regard, but I am not hopeful that we'll retain that ability. It seems to me that the overselling of the sciences at the expense of the humanities is detrimental to maintaining the mindset for questioning ourselves and our normal interpretations of the universe. (For those of you who don't know me, I'm a theoretical physicist, so I'm not exactly a science-hater. But I'd probably side against Sokal on such things.) In general, my experience - as a student at several of the best universities in the world - is that humanities people on average are more open-minded and better at asking questions than science people on average. (The truly smart people I don't think I can compare.) I think it's the objectivity craze's fault: scientists these days are raised to think they're objective, when they're really not, while humanities people are forced to think about subjectivity. The science enthusiast movement isn't helping things. For me it's gotten to the point that I would probably not even date a scientist, and would much prefer someone in the humanities. (My last boyfriend got mad at me when I imagined a world in which we didn't perceive plants as green. He was like, "The chemistry of photosynthesis/our eyes and the physics of light mean plants have to be green." And I was like, "Ugh, that's it - I can't go out with someone who doesn't even know what qualia are." (This story may be exaggerated.))

So there are two possible roadblocks: the possible intractability of future scientific and technological problems, and the possible evolution of our social mindset away from factors that promote inquisitiveness. Either of these could cause technological progress to stagnate.


qualeshia3 wrote:


official-shinsengumi wrote:

Who knows? Maybe the world will end up a dystopia..


If that happens, I'll be glad I won't be alive then.


Plenty of people seem to be just fine with our current technocratic capitalist + internet mind swarm dystopia.
47137 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
26 / F / New Jersey, USA
Offline
Posted 3/7/17
Thanks for the comments, cool people.
Posted 3/7/17

bronzefoot wrote:

I tell ya, rabbits are just biding their time to enslave us all. 10000 AD RABBIT-POCOLYPSE


I'll eat them.
463 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
25 / M / Every desk drawer...
Offline
Posted 3/7/17

Lord_Wunder wrote:

Well, I mean, any year could be the year 10,000 depending on your calendar.

As for what the year 10,000 would be like, it's hard to say. Technological advancement is exponential, so we'd probably have technology that we, as we are now, couldn't hope to comprehend.

I wouldn't be surprised if we became immortal cyber-humans or something (assuming there are no mass extinction-level catastrophes before then, of course).


Are you thinking more along the lines of the Borg, or Cybermen?

185 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
36 / M
Offline
Posted 3/7/17
We will have long killed ourselves by then.

But a new evolved species will occur, and think of us as a speculative lost advance civilization atlantis. With primitive cups and bowls they find, writings on walls and random tech that survives which makes them think we moved to the stars! Or something. Exactly why we dig up old stuff that might be more advanced, they killed themselves, and we evolved to take the new lead. Ants will be the next rulers!!! Or some silicon based lifeform.
1322 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
F / The Great White N...
Offline
Posted 3/7/17
If the Y2K bug happened in the year 10 000 I'd find it hilarious.
But really I wouldn't because I'd be dead.
62371 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
28 / M
Offline
Posted 3/7/17 , edited 3/7/17

auroraloose wrote:

My last boyfriend got mad at me when I imagined a world in which we didn't perceive plants as green. He was like, "The chemistry of photosynthesis/our eyes and the physics of light mean plants have to be green." And I was like, "Ugh, that's it - I can't go out with someone who doesn't even know what qualia are." (This story may be exaggerated.)


Because we are on an anime forum and you are mentioning qualia, I am going to recommend a novel I read recently called Murasakiiro no Qualia. The fact that you appear to enjoy pondering things like a world where we didn't perceive plants as green indicates to me that you would probably enjoy it. FYI, it appears there is also a manga, but I haven't read it so I can really only recommend the novel.
47137 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
26 / F / New Jersey, USA
Offline
Posted 3/7/17

likenew wrote:

We will have long killed ourselves by then.

But a new evolved species will occur, and think of us as a speculative lost advance civilization atlantis. With primitive cups and bowls they find, writings on walls and random tech that survives which makes them think we moved to the stars! Or something. Exactly why we dig up old stuff that might be more advanced, they killed themselves, and we evolved to take the new lead. Ants will be the next rulers!!! Or some silicon based lifeform.



Maybe so. I like to think that mankind won't make it to 1,000,000 AD.
47137 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
26 / F / New Jersey, USA
Offline
Posted 3/7/17

PokemonBecky wrote:

If the Y2K bug happened in the year 10 000 I'd find it hilarious.
But really I wouldn't because I'd be dead.


Same here.
5289 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
35 / M / Midwestern United...
Offline
Posted 3/7/17

qualeshia3 wrote:

Will mankind ever reach the year 10,000 AD/ 10th millennium?


I find it dubious based on our track record and concerns I have seen over human genetics. Hardly a mainstream view, and as I consider it largely a non-issue I am not worried about defending it, but it seems that we aren't so much evolving as devolving. If this trend changes, or at least our technology can offset the deficit in time... okay, we'll reach A.D. 10000, but I and anyone remotely close to me will already be dead. Odds are only a few current governments, religions, and works of fiction will still be around, but they may be so transformed by then as to be unrecognizable.
3336 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
17 / F
Offline
Posted 3/7/17
Maybe we will lose everything, then start again, then lose everything, then start again. You know, maybe the world will be the same as today, or the same as 20 centuries ago, or the same as the 18th century. I don't think things will be futuristic as the Jetsons Family after 10,000 years
47137 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
26 / F / New Jersey, USA
Offline
Posted 3/7/17

KamisamanoOtaku wrote:


qualeshia3 wrote:

Will mankind ever reach the year 10,000 AD/ 10th millennium?


I find it dubious based on our track record and concerns I have seen over human genetics. Hardly a mainstream view, and as I consider it largely a non-issue I am not worried about defending it, but it seems that we aren't so much evolving as devolving. If this trend changes, or at least our technology can offset the deficit in time... okay, we'll reach A.D. 10000, but I and anyone remotely close to me will already be dead. Odds are only a few current governments, religions, and works of fiction will still be around, but they may be so transformed by then as to be unrecognizable.


I like to hope mankind will reach to that year. We've come so far that maybe we can go even farther.
11440 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
23 / M / The outer atmoshe...
Offline
Posted 3/7/17

PWRofInk wrote:


Lord_Wunder wrote:

Well, I mean, any year could be the year 10,000 depending on your calendar.

As for what the year 10,000 would be like, it's hard to say. Technological advancement is exponential, so we'd probably have technology that we, as we are now, couldn't hope to comprehend.

I wouldn't be surprised if we became immortal cyber-humans or something (assuming there are no mass extinction-level catastrophes before then, of course).


Are you thinking more along the lines of the Borg, or Cybermen?



Hmm, I probably say something more like the human-Cylons (or whatever they were called) from Battlestar Galactica. Like, we'd still look like humans, but we wouldn't age and we would be connected to an over-mind of some sort that would allows us to basically make saves of our brains, so that if our bodies were destroyed, we could download our personalities into new ones. I imagine the over-mind would also basically be the internet, if it were directly connected to our brains.

I imagine it would start with technology becoming more and more a part of our lives, to the point that it becomes a part of us (figuratively, not literally). I expect that after we figure out how to halt the aging process (making us effectively immortal), we'll start experimenting with the literal side. And then, over time, our biological bodies would get replaced with cybernetic bodies.

Whether we'd go full hive-mind collective, it's hard to say. I guess I could see both.
First  Prev  1  2  3  Next  Last
You must be logged in to post.