Post Reply Hit a wall on miRNS
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So, lizard can regenerate its limb according to a shape, a blueprint. Theoretically, if you modify this shape, you could have a 5 years old shape while you are 30 years old. Shape=age? The body might go through aptosis to get to that shape, but I am not sure if regeneration is required. To change this blueprint you need to home the body parts governing it and reset it to when you are 5 years old. It might or might not reverse the rest of the body. This is where the immortal jellyfish comes in.

And if all things fail there will be a 5 years old potion if you do manage to revert every single cell in the body for a failsafe

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Posted 3/13/17 , edited 3/13/17
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I wish I was 5 years old with 30 year old brain.
Posted 3/13/17

HateKillingCamels wrote:

I wish I was 5 years old with 30 year old brain.


Maybe that's what happens when 30 year olds become a wizard.
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I have seen many 30 year olds act like 5 year olds.
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Posted 3/14/17 , edited 3/14/17
http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/11250003.2016.1203034?src=recsys& A brief study of the jellyfish

https://academic.oup.com/hmg/article/25/14/2934/2525770/Systems-level-analysis-of-human-aging-genes-shed An examination of aging

There were studies of the 'immortal jellyfish' where they did RNA examinations, but it cost money. The immortal jellyfish may actually be able to 'revert' to polyp state because it isn't a very complicated organism. For more complicated organisms, such as humanity, a more robust method may be necessary.

http://genesdev.cshlp.org/content/13/18/2353.full
http://clinchem.aaccjnls.org/content/43/5/708
http://journal.frontiersin.org/article/10.3389/fgene.2015.00082/full
http://rstb.royalsocietypublishing.org/content/366/1561/76

Telemeres are thought to be somewhat central to human aging in particular.
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Posted 3/13/17 , edited 3/14/17

starshots wrote:


HateKillingCamels wrote:

I wish I was 5 years old with 30 year old brain.


Maybe that's what happens when 30 year olds become a wizard.


Starshots, that's the funniest comment I see today lol , reading Gornotck's paper



Hi Gornotck, thanks for showing an interest on what I am looking for. I am making a comparison between immortal jellyfish and how human might be able to reverse aging.

To begin with, salamander is capable of wound repair. So if you amputate one of its arm it grows an arm back, not a leg.

So how does the salamander's body knows what that arm looks like? My speculation is there is a blueprint of the entire bodyshape stored somewhere within our genome and it simply retrieve it from where it needs.

To begin with, the macrophages enter the salamander's wounded area and convert those cells into embryonic stem cells. Then it releases miRNA to try and instruct these stem cells to grow into am arm. So these miRNA has lots to do with what the blueprint of the salamander's body would look like at the current age.

So assuming miRNA 22 is the one showing up (I am giving a random number for the examples), I look up on Google and it says miRNA 22 comes from salamander's chromosome 8, then I check the body map to see where chromosome 8 genes is active on the body, and I found out it is mostly on the skeletal tissue. So now I would say hah, the blueprint for salamander's body is stored in the skeletal tissue because that is where the miRNA 22 is sent from.

Now to reverse aging, you send a different miRNA into the blood stream, one that would target the skeletal tissue's blueprint and modify the genome so that it matches the genome of when the lizard is 5 years old. Now one of two things would happen, either the salamander's skeletal tissue blueprint start telling the salamander's body to reverse back to when he was 5 years old, or nothing happens and you need to trigger a wound repair mechanism to update the rest of the body.

Now why do I come to this conclusion? Because immortal jellyfish is capable of reverse aging. I speculate that it revert the genome at the crucial areas(the jellyfish blueprint at the tentacles), then the tentacles start telling the rest of the jellyfish body to reverse the aging process, inducing aptosis to the tentacles and being growing stolons. This is also speculation as I cannot find enough information on Google about miRNA and immortal jellyfish.

I myself do not have an immortal jellyfish, I would like to get my hands on it, but I do not have the equipment for analysis either = =. So I am only making speculations here as to how reverse aging would work on humans. Shin Kubota is a pinoeer Japanese at Kyoto University studying immortal jellyfish, you might be able to buy one from him.

Lastly, here's an image of what I think Lorreen looks like .

https://i.ytimg.com/vi/XfP_7Dtaiug/maxresdefault.jpg

P.S Let me now what you think Gorntck, and see if we can figure out reverse aging together

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2kLSiE-eNjw

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Posted 3/14/17 , edited 3/14/17

gornotck wrote:

http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/11250003.2016.1203034?src=recsys& A brief study of the jellyfish

https://academic.oup.com/hmg/article/25/14/2934/2525770/Systems-level-analysis-of-human-aging-genes-shed An examination of aging

There were studies of the 'immortal jellyfish' where they did RNA examinations, but it cost money. The immortal jellyfish may actually be able to 'revert' to polyp state because it isn't a very complicated organism. For more complicated organisms, such as humanity, a more robust method may be necessary.

http://genesdev.cshlp.org/content/13/18/2353.full
http://clinchem.aaccjnls.org/content/43/5/708
http://journal.frontiersin.org/article/10.3389/fgene.2015.00082/full
http://rstb.royalsocietypublishing.org/content/366/1561/76

Telemeres are thought to be somewhat central to human aging in particular.


This is from my other post, puberty and aging.


fredreload wrote:


Apholo wrote:

Look up the free radical theory if you want to learn more about aging.


Yes I know the DNA damage theory similar to this one. But I've also read somewhere that when cell revert back to its stem cell state, all DNA damage, mitochondrial damage, and telomere length are repaired and restored to its initial state, sounds promising heh


P.S But the miRNA must have some correlation, like the muscle miRNA from muscle cells, neuron miRNA from neuron cells, but how does it remember the shape? From the right arm? But if you amputate both arms they still grow = =
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Posted 3/14/17 , edited 3/14/17
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5268423/
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4789489/
I did not read them in detail, but basically it appears that they 'remember' through receptors that cause the microRNA to react in specific ways, whether it be to turn on gene expressions, turn off gene expressions, cause the cell to perform certain reactions and then return to the original state, or possibly other ways. The microRNA itself appears to be pretty much inaccessible except when reacting to environmental factors.

The second article talks about early childhood diseases affecting these processes, I believe. Jumping wildly to a conclusion, I suppose if you had some way of recording the RNA/DNA of someone, and comparing it to the damages caused by aging, you could figure out some way to repair, perhaps through a constructed virus, the damaged RNA creating imperfect copies and bring it back into line. You might, in fact, if this is true, even modify the regulating RNA to eliminate undesirable DNA constructions, eliminating diseases at a genetic level. A sort of 'gene therapy'.

I don't know. The only correlations I can think of there being would be as cells differentiate, the microRNA doesn't so much specialize as much as overtly reacting to stimulus given by that sort of differentiated cell type. We seem to be able to get cells to go back to the 'stem cell' state, which you say reverts it and regenerates all the damages, so we may be able to get them to react to stimuli that would cause them to revert to the original, differentiated cell type, without going to stem cell state. I wonder if that would give the same regenerated condition.

I would have to actually delve more deeply into this. I can located and digest information, and pull assumptions from that, but I lack the fundamental framework to really give accurate conclusions.

As to salamander shape... https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4613296/
I don't think you can extend a metaphor far enough to say that you just find the 'blueprint' of an older state and introduce it to the current state. I have heard DNA called 'our blueprint', as expressed as chromosomes and genes. In this way, certainly, salamanders would have a 'blueprint' that would rebuild certain parts based on the subtle chemical differences released by traumatized areas. As I believe the article says, we don't really know why and we find out more all the time.
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gornotck wrote:

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5268423/
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4789489/
I did not read them in detail, but basically it appears that they 'remember' through receptors that cause the microRNA to react in specific ways, whether it be to turn on gene expressions, turn off gene expressions, cause the cell to perform certain reactions and then return to the original state, or possibly other ways. The microRNA itself appears to be pretty much inaccessible except when reacting to environmental factors.

The second article talks about early childhood diseases affecting these processes, I believe. Jumping wildly to a conclusion, I suppose if you had some way of recording the RNA/DNA of someone, and comparing it to the damages caused by aging, you could figure out some way to repair, perhaps through a constructed virus, the damaged RNA creating imperfect copies and bring it back into line. You might, in fact, if this is true, even modify the regulating RNA to eliminate undesirable DNA constructions, eliminating diseases at a genetic level. A sort of 'gene therapy'.

I don't know. The only correlations I can think of there being would be as cells differentiate, the microRNA doesn't so much specialize as much as overtly reacting to stimulus given by that sort of differentiated cell type. We seem to be able to get cells to go back to the 'stem cell' state, which you say reverts it and regenerates all the damages, so we may be able to get them to react to stimuli that would cause them to revert to the original, differentiated cell type, without going to stem cell state. I wonder if that would give the same regenerated condition.

I would have to actually delve more deeply into this. I can located and digest information, and pull assumptions from that, but I lack the fundamental framework to really give accurate conclusions.

As to salamander shape... https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4613296/


Right, the epigenome, if you check out the article I posted for SALK here https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2016/12/161215143541.htm. You would see that they are using the same idea as you've mentioned in regenerating the cells back to a younger state. They suggested a clinical trial in 10 years, which I am paying close attention to. They suggested it would give a life extension of 30%, but it does not seem like true reverse aging, and I am not sure if you can repeat the process multiple times. That is why I decided to look up on immortal jellyfish. The treatment you mentioned for cancer is also on the way. I will post a video clip for it.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hshTf8OZJS4

I suppose we really need to look at the immortal jellyfish to understand the mechanism behind reverse aging.


gornotck wrote:
As to salamander shape... https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4613296/
I don't think you can extend a metaphor far enough to say that you just find the 'blueprint' of an older state and introduce it to the current state. I have heard DNA called 'our blueprint', as expressed as chromosomes and genes. In this way, certainly, salamanders would have a 'blueprint' that would rebuild certain parts based on the subtle chemical differences released by traumatized areas. As I believe the article says, we don't really know why and we find out more all the time.


Right the wound happens, and the miRNA responded. So the wounded area must notify whichever tissue that is sending the miRNA what is missing. This signaling mechanism is never mentioned. Well there has been attempts on building an entire body's epigenome. Personally I think this would need some pretty advanced in vitro laser scanner to capture everything in detail, but I don't think such a technology exist yet. We can also try molecular dynamics simulation in a computer, but that seems even further away.
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