Post Reply ANIME VIDEO CONTINUES 12 Year Decline
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Posted 3/20/17
ANIME VIDEO CONTINES 12 Year Decline


They keep saying anime is in for a big burst !



ANN NEWS

Anime Video Market in Japan Sees 15.8% Decrease in 2016
Anime home video market follows general home video market trend


The Japan Video Software Association (JVA) released its 12-month statistical report on March 14 on video software sales in Japan from January to December 2016. The report stated that anime DVD and Blu-ray Disc sales, including rentals, amounted to 54.420 billion yen (about US$483.6 million), a 15.8% decrease from last year.

Sales and rentals of both anime and foreign animation combined amounted to 61.885 billion yen (about US$550 million), a 15% decrease from last year. The amount represents 31.9% of the entire DVD and Blu-ray Disc sales market, and 26.1% of the rental market.

Excluding rentals, home video sales of anime for general audiences amounted to 41.849 billion yen (about US$371 million), a 14.7% decrease from last year's figure. The sales were 27.3% of the overall home video sales market. Blu-ray Disc sales of anime for general audiences totaled 32.043 billion yen (US$284.8 million), a 17.6% decrease from last year. The anime for general audiences Blu-ray Disc sales made up 38.3% of Blu-ray Disc sales in general, the largest portion of any category. DVD sales in the category totaled 9.806 billion (US$87.1 million), down 3.8% from 2015. Sales in the category made up 14.1% of the overall DVD market.

Excluding rentals, home video sales of anime for children totaled 2.176 billion yen (US$19.3 million), which is a 41% decrease from 2015. Home video sales of anime for children made up 1.4% of the overall market.

The average price for individual DVDs in 2016 was 3,385 yen (about US$29), which increased by 8.4% from last year. The average price for individual Blu-ray Discs was 5,137 yen (about US$45), a 4.1% increase from last year.

The anime home video market's sales decline follows the trend for the larger general market, which saw a 6.1% decrease in sales (including rentals) with a total amount of 204.727 billion yen (about US$1.819 billion) for 2016.

Home video revenue in Japan has gradually declined since 2005, as seen in the chart below. From the past 12 years, sales hit their peak in 2004, with a revenue of 375.3 billion yen.



http://animationbusiness.info/archives/2162

http://www.animenewsnetwork.com/news/2017-03-20/anime-video-market-in-japan-sees-15.8-percent-decrease-in-2016/.113637
Posted 3/20/17
well of course disk sales are decreasing, in this day and age everything is digital.
xxJing 
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Posted 3/20/17
It doesn't surprise me, it's a market that thrives on selling overpriced products to a niche audience. And yes, the majority of anime is actually niche in Japan. Only things like One Piece, Naruto, Detective Conan, etc are really main stream.

Among the western anime fandom TTGL has a huge following, however, you ask a Japanese person about it, and they have most likely never heard of it unless they are an otaku.
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Posted 3/20/17 , edited 3/20/17

Hobomilk wrote:

well of course disk sales are decreasing, in this day and age everything is digital.


This.

Physical media sales in general are in decline. I work for a company that in the past would have been known as (and probably still is known as) a textbook publisher. We're actually marketing ourselves these days as more of an education technology company. We do still publish and sell physical books, but those sales are down, while we are seeing huge growth not simply in plain eBooks, but in products that provide an online all-in-one course that combines book content, and interactive tutorials, videos, quizzes, etc.

In the case of anime, I guess the question is not simply will the decline in disc sales and rentals lead to fewer anime being produced, but to what extent will distribution be expanded or shifted to other areas like paid streaming in Japan, and if there are fewer anime produced are there certain kinds of anime that will become more scarce?

Will anime producers try to create and market products of broader appeal rather than relying on a spendy niche market? Will they form more collaborations with creators and producers outside of Japan and market more heavily to non-Japanese audiences? I don't know much about the industry, but I definitely get the impression that more of that latter is already going on, and that may be part of a strategy to counter things like declining disc sales.
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Posted 3/20/17
Hundo for a disk and they ask themselves why it's not selling.
Dragon
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Posted 3/20/17
I sure hope it doesn't implode, I rather like anime. Just because the sales have shifted from physical to digital, it doesn't seem like we've lost out on quality or quantity, so imploding seems.. unlikely?

Of course, I still try to buy physical when I can, because licenses change over time. I'm still bummed that I can't watch Sacred Seven whenever I want right now. But I know I'm in the minority, especially among those who subscribe to a digital distribution service....
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Posted 3/20/17
They still have actual BD/DVD rental stores in Japan. They've strung the physical video model out way longer than its expiration pretty much everywhere else--protecting it jealously without looking for a viable alternative. We get to see this variety because there's still a market in Japan that will pay hundreds of dollars for a box set not because we're paying pennies to watch it on CR.
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Posted 3/20/17
Anime production companies are probably going to need to switch to more electronic methods to make money. With an increase in the popularity of streaming anime and a decrease in physical sales, these companies should switch to what is growing in order to stay open in the long run. While i am no expert in business, I feel that these companies need to adapt to the changing consumption of anime or else they will risk possible bankruptcy or significant drops. They should at least try to sell them online to make profits that way.

(Disclaimer: This statement is based my observations. My main basis is the growth of Crunchyroll and the decline of sales of DVDs mentioned above. I am by no means an expert in this, nor do i claim to be. This is purely my opinion.)
Posted 3/20/17 , edited 3/20/17

saprobe wrote:
They still have actual BD/DVD rental stores in Japan. They've strung the physical video model out way longer than its expiration pretty much everywhere else--protecting it jealously without looking for a viable alternative.

we already saw this happen here 15 years ago. Japan REALLY needs to catch up with the times. it cuts down on piracy, and is cheaper for the distributors because they don't need to print or ship physical media, and they won't have to worry about stores taking a cut of the purchase price. that's 2 things the anime industry in Japan seems to struggle with, and punishes harshly because they just don't want to move forward technologically.
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Posted 3/20/17

aidenraine wrote:
that's 2 things the anime industry in Japan seems to struggle with, and punishes harshly because they just don't want to move forward technologically.

A lot of people in Japan were using Windows XP even 2 years ago.
Posted 3/20/17

bathroom64 wrote:
A lot of people in Japan were using Windows XP even 2 years ago.

fun fact... there are apparently people at my work who have work computers so old that they still run WinXP
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Posted 3/20/17
too many shows not enough buyers.
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