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Post Reply A Muppet with autism to be welcomed soon on 'Sesame Street'
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Posted 3/21/17 , edited 3/21/17

AlienNineFan wrote:

Didn't you use to be a girl, before you suddenly remembered you were a guy? For the longest time I thought you were a self-hating woman, before I realized you were a stereotypical sexist.


I was a bit of a sexist--in such a manner that I was attempting to logically explain female behavior I experienced. I already moved passed my misogynist phase a couple years back. I picked up some books on human behavior, psychology and neurology--thanks for asking.

P.S. Assuming that a female could only dislike other females due to hating qualities in herself is a bit of a sexist assumption, wouldn't you agree?

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Posted 3/21/17 , edited 3/21/17

runec wrote:


Rujikin wrote:
P.S. Calling completely obsessed people Autists is a term of endearment on the internet.


Yeah, no, it's not.


"Geeks" is a term of endearment for noble obsessions, "Autism" in the slang sense is a complaint about people who anal-retentively can't give up their favorite subject even though everyone would like them to, eg. Trump still obsessing over the election.


Dark_Alma wrote:


redokami wrote:

it isn't so much that I cant spell and have poor English, its that when im thinking,the process of the thought going to paper is...or in this case spelled out on screen is...disrupted its hard for me to put it down the way I REALLY want it to be, ....also one of the reasons why I have mis understood arguments on here


Then do what I do (and what my father taught me). Write it down and then do something for 5 minutes. Come back to it later and re-read it. If it sounds good and flows well, then submit. If not, try to clarify the issues which you saw. It greatly helps you clarify what you mean.


A lot of the scrambled Autie posts we get on the forum have been additionally scrambled by being English-second-language, but our first judgment at seeing "hey ppl, wahts doign, rememmmbr mi last 6ix potts?" without capitals, proper spelling, punctuation, inscrutable "texting" abbreviations, a little TOO much jaunty presumed "intimacy" with the posting regulars as if we'd been lifelong buddies, and bizarre misspelling that most people wouldn't even make by accident, looks like someone just typed it up and sent it out because their brain was connected to the keyboard with no intermediary in between.
And, speaking for the higher-functions, that's the key point: Autism-spectrum says whatever's on their mind at any moment, regardless of whether or not anyone can understand it, because it's in THEIR head. Not anyone else's, which is why most people can't understand it even when it is spelled or formatted correctly.
(And also why they tend to serial their own posts, and pick them up directly where they left off, even if a week or month went by between--"Oh, I forgot to mention...")

I may be a bit High-Function myself, which is why people tend to look at my posts as the unfathomable Oracle of Delphi whenever I try to explain my more instinctive ideas on movies or politics (I go with what's directly in my head, whether or not everyone else already has the backstory context info), but high or low, the Spectrum's problem is Seeing Ourselves As Others See Us. That's the big stumbling block.
To see that, you have to do what your old high-school writing teacher told you, and read your own compositions before you submit them. "Half of writing is revision", they'd tell you, and it's true; anyone can improve their "quick" posts by just taking a little time first to clean them up.

(Oh, and by "You", I mean in the general colloquial sense of the word, ie. "everybody"--The presumed best-buddies conversational intimacy of Spectrum also believes that whatever they read is addressed DIRECTLY TO THEM, and when it suddenly turns harsh, the heightened sense of anger bursts out "Why are you suddenly being mean to me? I didn't do anything!" Which, of course, they believe they didn't.)
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Posted 3/21/17 , edited 3/21/17

Ejanss wrote
A lot of the scrambled Autie posts we get on the forum have been additionally scrambled by being English-second-language, but our first judgment at seeing "hey ppl, wahts doign, rememmmbr mi last 6ix potts?" without capitals, proper spelling, punctuation inscrutable "texting" abbreviations, and bizarre misspelling that most people wouldn't even make by accident, looks like someone just typed it up and sent it out because their brain was connected to the keyboard with no intermediary in between.
And, speaking for the higher-functions, that's the key point: Autism-spectrum says whatever's on their mind at any moment, regardless of whether or not anyone can understand it, because it's in THEIR head. Not anyone else's, which is why most people can't understand it even when it is spelled or formatted correctly.
(And also why they tend to serial their posts, and pick them up directly where they left off, even if a week or month went by between--"Oh, I forgot to mention...")

I may be a big High-Function myself, which is why people tend to look at my posts as the unfathomable Oracle of Delphi whenever I try to explain my more instinctive ideas on movies or politics (I go with what's directly in my head, whether or not everyone else already has the backstory context info), but high or low, the Spectrum's problem is Seeing Ourselves As Others See Us. That's the big stumbling block.
To see that, you have to do what your old high-school writing teacher told you, and read your own compositions before you submit them. "Half of writing is revision", they'd tell you, and it's true; anyone can improve their "quick" posts by just taking a little time first to clean them up.


I probably edit all of posts at least twice if not 5x over. I get pretty meticulous about it. I don't catch my writing errors the first time I read it over--similar to how I read books I 'skip' many words (sometimes words get substituted in my head like 'already' for 'unnecessary' or 'when' for 'one', etc.). Yet, when I reread I don't notice those words may be missing or may be substituted despite how glaringly obvious they may be. Often I only see things after I hit submit--sometimes I catch them hours after, even.

I'm unstructured and frustratingly incoherent in person, but I am fortunate to have a manner to express myself online through a keyboard. I take many things for granted, but if my deficits were exaggerated more I'd imagine correction in my writing would take a slippery slope down to hell (much like my speaking ability--the processing just isn't there). I'm sure it improve if people took more time, but at some point there's a threshold where it doesn't get much better within a reasonable time frame due to those word processing deficits.



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llunga 
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Posted 3/21/17

I got something to say about that. The fact that so many people don't understand autism. The reason they're loud like that is because they're sensitive to light and sound. Stop looking at them angrily because you want them to "shut up". I'd love to see you all walk in their shoes for a day, I bet you'd be screaming your heads off.
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Posted 3/21/17 , edited 3/21/17

llunga wrote:


I got something to say about that. The fact that so many people don't understand autism. The reason they're loud like that is because they're sensitive to light and sound. Stop looking at them angrily because you want them to "shut up". I'd love to see you all walk in their shoes for a day, I bet you'd be screaming your heads off.


Part of it is sensory overload, but a large portion of it as well is the lack of emotional regulation (ex. high anxiety levels entangle with lower thresholds for excitement) and an easily overwhelmed nervous system. The mind is excessively rigid in individuals with ASD because they have more "black-and-white" thinking and their resulting emotions match that intricate and fragile balance between those extremes.

So why someone with autism is loud can be for a number of reasons--they may be experiencing sensory overload, their emotional response may be exaggerated, or maybe you infringed upon their fragile and rigid environment by moving the silverware on the table out of its 'usual' place. It could also be because they don't know how to modulate their tone of voice or maybe process sounds around them ('muddled' - improper filtering [ex. moving of plates takes priority over people's voices]). It's not always sensitivity to the environment--not everyone with ASD experiences over-reactive senses (some, like myself, have a couple under-reactive senses).

It can be very hard to live this way, especially for those lower on the spectrum--however, one can make an excuse for all their negative behaviors in such a manner. Some sympathy is due, but lines are drawn somewhere (not that it's for the common passerby to draw given how little knowledge they have on the individual's basis).

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Posted 3/21/17 , edited 3/21/17

PrinceJudar wrote:


Ejanss wroteTo see that, you have to do what your old high-school writing teacher told you, and read your own compositions before you submit them. "Half of writing is revision", they'd tell you, and it's true; anyone can improve their "quick" posts by just taking a little time first to clean them up.


I probably edit all of posts at least twice if not 5x over. I get pretty meticulous about it. I don't catch my writing errors the first time I read it over--similar to how I read books I 'skip' many words (sometimes words get substituted in my head like 'already' for 'unnecessary' or 'when' for 'one', etc.). Yet, when I reread I don't notice those words may be missing or may be substituted despite how glaringly obvious they may be. Often I only see things after I hit submit--sometimes I catch them hours after, even.

I'm unstructured and frustratingly incoherent in person, but I am fortunate to have a manner to express myself online through a keyboard. I take many things for granted, but if my deficits were exaggerated more I'd imagine correction in my writing would take a slippery slope down to hell (much like my speaking ability--the processing just isn't there). I'm sure it improve if people took more time, but at some point there's a threshold where it doesn't get much better within a reasonable time frame due to those word processing deficits.

Edit Count: 3


Being a writer/blogger myself, I know how important it is to obsess over everything in print before spanking it on the bottom and sending it out into the world, and even after posting, I confess I'm a little too comfortable with Internet forums that let you edit the posts indefinitely without that little giveaway "Edit Count" or "Reason for editing:" message at the bottom.
I don't need a Reason to Edit, I know anything always sounds better in a second draft.
llunga 
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Posted 3/21/17

PrinceJudar wrote:


llunga wrote:


I got something to say about that. The fact that so many people don't understand autism. The reason they're loud like that is because they're sensitive to light and sound. Stop looking at them angrily because you want them to "shut up". I'd love to see you all walk in their shoes for a day, I bet you'd be screaming your heads off.


Part of it is sensory overload, but a large portion of it as well is the lack of emotional regulation (ex. high anxiety levels entangle with lower thresholds for excitement) and an easily overwhelmed nervous system. The mind is excessively rigid in individuals with ASD because they have more "black-and-white" thinking and their resulting emotions match that intricate and fragile balance between those extremes.

So why someone with autism is loud can be for a number of reasons--they may be experiencing sensory overload, their emotional response may be exaggerated, or maybe you infringed upon their fragile and rigid environment by moving the silverware on the table out of its 'usual' place. It could also be because they don't know how to modulate their tone of voice or maybe process sounds around them ('muddled' - improper filtering [ex. moving of plates takes priority over people's voices]). It's not always sensitivity to the environment--not everyone with ASD experiences over-reactive senses (some, like myself, have a couple under-reactive senses).

It can be very hard to live this way, especially for those lower on the spectrum--however, one can make an excuse for all their negative behaviors in such a manner. Some sympathy is due, but lines are drawn somewhere (not that it's for the common passerby to draw given how little knowledge they have on the individual's basis).



Yes, but you get people saying, "Why won't that kid shut up". "Why won't someone shut that kid up", they have no knowledge of why they behave this way. It's mostly the older generation. You're right there is a time they should learn to behave themselves and as a guardian you should be able to tell the difference. I mean I'm sure sometimes they misbehave a little more than they should but as a stranger walking by people need to understand that they can't abide by the social norms like everyone else. It really bugs me that it's not common knowledge yet.
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Posted 3/21/17
The fact that forumers like Rujikin use it as if it were term to be strung out everywhere proudly in reference to 4chan trolls and their antics (Apparently called "weaponized autism") convinces me that we need this, either as a path to understanding autism or to counteract the unironic usage of said word.

Just so damn cringy. Maybe I'll accept it later. Iunno.
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Posted 3/21/17 , edited 3/21/17

Ejanss wrote:
Being a writer/blogger myself, I know how important it is to obsess over everything in print before spanking it on the bottom and sending it out into the world, and even after posting, I confess I'm a little too comfortable with Internet forums that let you edit the posts indefinitely without that little giveaway "Edit Count" or "Reason for editing:" message at the bottom.
I don't need a Reason to Edit, I know anything always sounds better in a second draft.


It's hard not to get comfortable with an environment that allows for consistent editing (especially for the meticulous). I know without that ability I simply had papers covered in wite-out. I couldn't write in pen for that very reason. I consistently ripped papers with erasers if not my overexerted force on a pencil.

Yep. Providing a reason for edit is annoying considering how much I do so--especially for small changes like commas.

Thankfully, I'm not a writer as you are. I'd be quite terrible at it, especially since I'm a heathen that inserts lazy em-dashes to replicate my colliding thought patterns in my casual writing. I also have little concept of formal grammar rules outside of replicating patterns I've taken from reading (I bombed grammar in my education).




llunga wrote:
Yes, but you get people saying, "Why won't that kid shut up". "Why won't someone shut that kid up", they have no knowledge of why they behave this way. It's mostly the older generation. You're right there is a time they should learn to behave themselves and as a guardian you should be able to tell the difference. I mean I'm sure sometimes they misbehave a little more than they should but as a stranger walking by people need to understand that they can't abide by the social norms like everyone else. It really bugs me that it's not common knowledge yet.


Lol, you'd hate my parents. I agree with you on the amount of misinformation or lack thereof on the disorder though. Just look at the 'anti-vaxxer' epidemic.


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Posted 3/21/17 , edited 3/21/17

PeripheralVisionary wrote:

The fact that forumers like Rujikin use it as if it were term to be strung out everywhere proudly in reference to 4chan trolls and their antics (Apparently called "weaponized autism") convinces me that we need this, either as a path to understanding autism or to counteract the unironic usage of said word.

Just so damn cringy. Maybe I'll accept it later. Iunno.


I really do hate how I keep seeing people use the word autist and autism as I fuckin INSULT on the internet
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Posted 3/21/17

PrinceJudar wrote:


llunga wrote:
Yes, but you get people saying, "Why won't that kid shut up". "Why won't someone shut that kid up", they have no knowledge of why they behave this way. It's mostly the older generation. You're right there is a time they should learn to behave themselves and as a guardian you should be able to tell the difference. I mean I'm sure sometimes they misbehave a little more than they should but as a stranger walking by people need to understand that they can't abide by the social norms like everyone else. It really bugs me that it's not common knowledge yet.


Lol, you'd hate my parents. I agree with you on the amount of misinformation or lack thereof on the disorder though. Just look at the 'anti-vaxxer' epidemic.




Anti-vaxxers aren't here because of a lack of easily available good information. They exist because they have an irrational fear of authority and thus try to fight it even over stupid shit where they are clearly wrong. There's plenty of conclusive evidence dismissing every lie these people propagate, but even when brought to their attention they'll just flat out ignore it or pretend its evidence of some grand conspiracy. No amount of refuting their shit will make them go away, sadly.
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Posted 3/21/17 , edited 3/21/17

redokami wrote:

I really do hate how I keep seeing people use the word autist and autism as I fuckin INSULT on the internet


Eh, I don't mind it so much--I find it funny sometimes even when it's directed at me. My issue is that most people that throw it around hardly understand a penny's worth about ASD. The line between 'joke' and 'ignorance' wears really thin at that point. Ignorance, not inflammatory humor--is what I find grating.

Autism has found itself as a new spotlight in inflammatory humor--and it's simply exposed the amount of ignorance people have on the subject.

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Posted 3/21/17
I feel as if in some scenarios this will go poorly as well. Of course, with every innovation or addition to something there will be but...I just have an off feeling as of how children will insult one and other with this. Nevertheless, acceptance is great.
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Posted 3/21/17 , edited 3/21/17

PrinceJudar wrote:


redokami wrote:

I really do hate how I keep seeing people use the word autist and autism as I fuckin INSULT on the internet


Eh, I don't mind it so much--I find it funny sometimes even when it's directed at me. My issue is that most people that throw it around hardly understand a penny's worth about ASD. The line between 'joke' and 'ignorance' wears really thin at that point. Ignorance, not inflammatory humor--is what I find grating.

Autism has found itself as a new spotlight in inflammatory humor--and it's simply exposed the amount of ignorance people have on the subject.


Still, when "Autistic" becomes a general non-medical pop slang term for "Annoying repetition" and "Total disassociation from realizing one's own unpopularity or when to stop being annoyingly repetitive", it's sort of in the same boat of how 10-yo.'s use "That's so gay!" as a general non-gender slang coverall term for "Mushily emo", "Wimpishly un-confrontational", "Oversenstively butthurt", "Embarrassingly self-indulgent" or "Immaturely petty or petulant about mean things said", that the LGBT community gets into petty, immature, oversensitive, butthurt and and mushily-emo complaints about seeing used as just a wider mass joke:

Namely, where do you draw the line between a slang term just ignorantly arising out of trendy headlines, and one that arises out of regular folks' experienced and built-up frustrations at having to deal with the real thing?
(And that those who are complaining, just can't look into that truthful pop-culture mirror.)
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cool?
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