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Post Reply The Republican-Controlled Senate Votes To Strip Internet Privacy Rules
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84 / F / Bite the pillow.
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Posted 3/23/17 , edited 3/23/17
For those in the U.S., just so you're aware of this:

- The Republican-Controlled Senate Votes To Strip Internet Privacy Rules
- https://www.buzzfeed.com/hamzashaban/the-republican-controlled-senate-votes-to-strip-internet?utm_term=.imxmX4bRM7#.lyk6xrEKDv

Passed by the Federal Communications Commission under president Obama, the privacy rules require internet providers like Comcast and AT&T to first get your permission before they can sell your private information like browsing history and location data.

The Senate voted Thursday to make it easier for internet service providers to share sensitive information about their customers, a first step in overturning landmark privacy rules that consumer advocates and Democratic lawmakers view as crucial protections in the digital age. The vote was passed along party lines, 50-48.


Fire up those VPNs, kids.
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20 / M / Winnipeg, MB.
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Posted 3/23/17 , edited 3/23/17
So if I understand correctly, these are some of the more impactful changes this brings:

-Internet providers can now give away you information without consent

-they can make money off of your info without you knowing about it.

-You no longer require to be told if there is a security breach and your private information gets out.

Yeah... no like.
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22 / F / England, UK
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Posted 3/23/17 , edited 3/23/17
Rest in Peace American citizens data, though hopefully they don't use it make money off your info like octorock is saying.

Though saying its sensitive information, I'm guessing that is including all internet logging data too, such as what websites you've visited, so they will know what porn you guys like, what weird stuff you are into, ew, kinda scared for you guys.
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28 / M / Ark-La-Tex
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Posted 3/23/17
Not filibuster proof, so maybe there's hope?
Posted 3/23/17
Has everyone been living under a rock?
NSA has databases with every keystroke you make and has been for years.
mxdan 
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Posted 3/23/17 , edited 3/23/17

Amyas_Leigh wrote:

Has everyone been living under a rock?
NSA has databases with every keystroke you make and has been for years.


Entirely different. That's not publicly distributed information. Is it ethically defensible? Oh hell no. Business are seen under United States law as people. This essentially means your private information is sold to the general public. I.E. curtains on your house become more illegal because of the private sector is god ideal 60 year old Republican senators delude themselves with.
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Posted 3/23/17
I just want to point out that this barely changes anything, since the rules were only implemented this past October. Furthermore, as I understand it, the justification for overturning the rules is that it involves the FTC getting into a totally new area, so they're trying to slow its growth. That doesn't make it a good idea, but this isn't the huge change some people are making out to be.
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20 / M / Winnipeg, MB.
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Posted 3/23/17

foraslan wrote:

I just want to point out that this barely changes anything, since the rules were only implemented this past October. Furthermore, as I understand it, the justification for overturning the rules is that it involves the FTC getting into a totally new area, so they're trying to slow its growth. That doesn't make it a good idea, but this isn't the huge change some people are making out to be.


I think the issue is less that it's a big change and more that it's a continuation down a bad and unwanted path.
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Posted 3/23/17

octorockandroll wrote:


foraslan wrote:

I just want to point out that this barely changes anything, since the rules were only implemented this past October. Furthermore, as I understand it, the justification for overturning the rules is that it involves the FTC getting into a totally new area, so they're trying to slow its growth. That doesn't make it a good idea, but this isn't the huge change some people are making out to be.


I think the issue is less that it's a big change and more that it's a continuation down a bad and unwanted path.


True enough. I guess I more or less made that comment so I would have a mental note to do further reading before I make up my mind about how bad it is. Personally, I think they should let the rule stand, and I'm pretty pissed that they would pick this one to do away with. But in practice, striking it down will be hardly noticed by anyone since it's just keeping the status quo.
Posted 3/23/17
pass me a drink nothing new they already share info and can look into
your private affairs.
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The White House
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Posted 3/23/17 , edited 3/23/17
Heres some background:

Pai feels the privacy rules unfairly target ISPs and give internet companies like Google and Facebook the ability to harvest more consumer data and dominate digital advertising. Google and Facebook are by far the two biggest players in the digital ad industry.

Websites like Google and Facebook are still regulated by the FTC's looser guidelines and thus are not forced to obtain opt-in consent before they collect and sell your web-browsing and app-usage data. This is partly why you may see ads personalized to your browsing history when you browse the web.

ISPs aren't happy about this discrepancy, and they have petitioned the FCC to roll back the rules entirely. Telecom industry groups have said keeping the rules could limit ISPs' ability to provide otherwise free or low-cost services. The wireless-industry trade group CTIA also argued in a note to the FCC last week that web-browsing and app-usage history were not "sensitive" information.

consumer-advocacy groups argue that it is fair to apply more stringent privacy rules to ISPs because it is generally more difficult to switch internet providers than it is to use different websites — particularly in rural and low-income areas with fewer choices of ISPs — and because ISPs are more easily capable of seeing everything you do over the internet connections they sell. (Though it's worth noting that behemoths like Google and Facebook are able to reach beyond their own sites.)

Republicans and other conservatives, however, call the privacy regulations an overreach by a federal agency.

"In reality, this is just yet another avenue designed to give the FCC more control over the internet that should be open," David Williams, the president of the right-leaning Taxpayers Protection Alliance, said Tuesday in a statement in favor of the act.

Pai ultimately wants to return ISP privacy regulation to the FTC, as was the case prior to the net-neutrality order. Until that's possible, though, he has called for a privacy framework that allows ISPs to be regulated under guidelines similar to those from the FTC, putting them back in line with how internet companies are enforced.

"All actors in the online space should be subject to the same rules, enforced by the same agency," Pai and the acting FTC chairwoman, Maureen Ohlhausen, said in a joint statement upon the FCC's data-security stay last month. "Until that happens, however, we will work together on harmonizing the FCC's privacy rules for broadband providers with the FTC's standards for other companies in the digital economy."


http://www.businessinsider.com/republicans-kill-fcc-broadband-privacy-rules-2017-3
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19 / M / Palm Coast, Florida
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Posted 3/23/17 , edited 3/24/17
-snip-
bakura 
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28 / M / uk
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Posted 3/24/17

melarkey wrote:

Rest in Peace American citizens data, though hopefully they don't use it make money off your info like octorock is saying.

Though saying its sensitive information, I'm guessing that is including all internet logging data too, such as what websites you've visited, so they will know what porn you guys like, what weird stuff you are into, ew, kinda scared for you guys.


as far as porn goes it's not much better for us. the digital economy bill among (which as nearly completed it's run in the house of lords) among other thing's will force porn site's to put strict age verification on there website's and those that don't will be blocked outright. on top of that the bill will also make it so are data we give can be shared with different government bodies and private company's without our permission. which is stupid because we're about to become part of something in may 2018 called GDPR (which we'll be part of regardless of brexit if we want to keep sharing our data with the EU) and one of it's rules (or the very little I've looked into) is that individual's are in charge of how there data is used.
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24 / M / Abyss
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Posted 3/24/17
Poor, poor history browsers. They are going to learn so many new words from me.

I am laughing thinking about it. That and I may get some... fun ads!
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Posted 3/30/17
It still hasn't become law yet Donald could veto it, let hope he does
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