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20 / M / Bundaberg, Queens...
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Posted 4/15/17 , edited 4/15/17

Dark_Alma wrote:


benegesserit wrote:

Hard question! I still have so much to learn but I am interested in
Electrochemistry
Photonics
Chaos and fractals
{I heart physics}


Congratz! Thee have bested me! Care to explain what those 3 are in terms for us plebeians?


IIRC Photonics is the study of transmision of photons and the study and use of them.
Electrochemistry is the study of which chemical processes move electrons iirc and according to the secondary search i did chaos and fractals i would guess have to do with chaos theory and fractal geometry but i could be wrong.

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22 / F / arcata
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Posted 4/15/17
fractals are patterns that repeat and go on no matter the scale...River networks are a good geology example i can think of! and chaos is the mathematical idea that some things lack an order or pattern..
Im sorry twas not trying to best ya, just got excited...im really dense
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28 / M
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Posted 4/15/17
Zoology, Paleontology and Astronomy.
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54 / M
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Posted 4/16/17
Archaeology
Cosmology
Information theory


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15 / F
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Posted 4/16/17
Forensics all the way
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26 / M / Leanbox, Gameindu...
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Posted 4/16/17 , edited 4/16/17
Well I'm a mechanical engineer, so there's that
I've always like math too, just getting those "aha" moments to solving complex problems has always felt satisfying.
Although, I've recently started to take some Computer Science courses and I have really enjoyed them.
I will also throw in physics since my brother (a physics major) and myself tend to have very long conversations in the car about it to the annoyance of my sister-in-law who is completely lost
As for bio and chem, idk. Chemistry I don't have any real passion for, perhaps for the same reason I don't for electrical engineering: I find it extremely difficult to visualize concepts. As for bio, maybe too much memorization of terms in my introductory courses and whatnot killed any enthusiasm I might have had for it, who knows.

Basically, like: math, physics, mech eng, computer science. Don't care much for: chemistry, bio, and other major branches of engineering.
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24 / M / Abyss
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Posted 4/16/17

kevz_210 wrote:

Well I'm a mechanical engineer, so there's that
I've always like math too, just getting those "aha" moments to solving complex problems has always felt satisfying.
Although, I've recently started to take some Computer Science courses and I have really enjoyed them.
I will also throw in physics since my brother (a physics major) and myself tend to have very long conversations in the car about it to the annoyance of my sister-in-law who is completely lost
As for bio and chem, idk. Chemistry I don't have any real passion for, perhaps for the same reason I don't for electrical engineering: I find it extremely difficult to visualize concepts. As for bio, maybe too much memorization of terms in my introductory courses and whatnot killed any enthusiasm I might have had for it, who knows.

Basically, like: math, physics, mech eng, computer science. Don't care much for: chemistry, bio, and other major branches of engineering.


Computer science is often really fun! I do enjoy the little of that I have done. As for physics... as I stated earlier.. I love it, but I suck at it! It is a love hate relationship. I have the theory down, but cant calculate the "Angle of the Dangle (as my professor called it)" for the life of me. I don't know how I made it through Physics for Engineers I and II.

That AH-HA moment in math is definitely great. I remember working on a PDE question for 5 hours before it was accepted. I had to have a beer to celebrate the triumph over the question! My friend is a mechanical engineer, but I have no knowledge in it sadly (other than the mechanical engineering class of Statics that I took as a Petroleum Engineer). That class was fun itself, though I never want to do it again!

I loved biology, but the smell of formaldehyde makes me sick. At least I only had to dissect one thing in High School before I got except! That poor squid had a horrible funeral... Cut up and... URGH!

Chemistry was fun. I took dual credit chemistry in High School. I remember my final project was messing with esters. One of them I used potassium cyanide. Toxic in and of itself... but I remember my teacher scared the hell out of my class...

"Now Dark_Alma, if you add any acid to the potassium cyanide, you will create a gas called hydrogen cyanide. This is due to the hydrogen replacing the potassium. If you do this, you will kill the entire class before they know it!" I of course, being the charming young man I was... 20 minutes later said "Whoops, I added some acid." The girl next to me shat bricks. Luckily adding acid to a different compound is what I had to do. I just milked it!
Posted 4/16/17 , edited 4/16/17
It may come to a surprise but I wasn't always intending on pursuing a degree in mathematics. My aspiration as a child was to become a "chemist" (a broad term, I know). By the time I was sixteen, I was at MIT studying Nuclear Engineering (the joys of mott/born scattering and nuclear binding energy equations were precursors to awakening my math-nerdiness). My "never completed" dissertation was on the combinatorics of the permutation enumeration of wreath products between certain groups.. 230 pages of goodness that was never submitted. I prefer theoretical mathematics or mathematics that focus on quantum mechanics (let's be real, physicists would be lost without us nerdy mathematicians too). Dirac sea, Poincaré group, Wightman axioms... to convexity (bond, combination, concave, conjugate...)... to discrete/combinatorial geometry... these are things that I still study and poke around with on a daily basis. I spend a lot of time reviewing research papers, dissertations that are freshly approved and uploaded to a few intranets I still have access to, or coming up with my own thoughts and theories.

I probably would have kept up with nuclear engineering or physics if I branched off into the science field of things. The interesting thing about being a mathematician is that (once you've positioned yourself well enough), you tend to be offered/asked to join think tanks that are theoretical physics or quantum mechanics-focused; simply as the person that makes sure that the math is right. Growing up, I was focused on chemistry because I had decent access to "proper" chemistry sets growing up (instead of the $30 ones you'd normally find at a hobby shop).

As for the "AH-HA" moments in mathematics - those are what mathematicians live for. Whether it takes 30 minutes or 30 days... the moment you finally get clarity on that problem... For me, it's a bit like listening to a symphony. There's music in numbers (and numbers in music) - which is kind of how I view mathematics in general. There's an elegance, a beauty, a rhythm .. to every problem you're working on.
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28 / F / The margins
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Posted 4/16/17 , edited 4/16/17

ninjitsuko wrote:

It may come to a surprise but I wasn't always intending on pursuing a degree in mathematics. My aspiration as a child was to become a "chemist" (a broad term, I know). By the time I was sixteen, I was at MIT studying Nuclear Engineering (the joys of mott/born scattering and nuclear binding energy equations were precursors to awakening my math-nerdiness). My "never completed" dissertation was on the combinatorics of the permutation enumeration of wrath products between certain groups.. 230 pages of goodness that was never submitted. I prefer theoretical mathematics or mathematics that focus on quantum mechanics (let's be real, physicists would be lost without us nerdy mathematicians too). Dirac sea, Poincaré group, Wightman axioms... to convexity (bond, combination, concave, conjugate...)... to discrete/combinatorial geometry... these are things that I still study and poke around with on a daily basis. I spend a lot of time reviewing research papers, dissertations that are freshly approved and uploaded to a few intranets I still have access to, or coming up with my own thoughts and theories.

I probably would have kept up with nuclear engineering or physics if I branched off into the science field of things. The interesting thing about being a mathematician is that (once you've positioned yourself well enough), you tend to be offered/asked to join think tanks that are theoretical physics or quantum mechanics-focused; simply as the person that makes sure that the math is right. Growing up, I was focused on chemistry because I had decent access to "proper" chemistry sets growing up (instead of the $30 ones you'd normally find at a hobby shop).

As for the "AH-HA" moments in mathematics - those are what mathematicians live for. Whether it takes 30 minutes or 30 days... the moment you finally get clarity on that problem... For me, it's a bit like listening to a symphony. There's music in numbers (and numbers in music) - which is kind of how I view mathematics in general. There's an elegance, a beauty, a rhythm .. to every problem you're working on.



ninjitsuko wrote:
wrath products


This is going in my list of great misspellings, along with "fury creatures" and "office horus".

I don't know all that much on the algebraic side, but it sounds like we enjoy very similar things.

And thank you for the thread, Dark_Alma.

Oh - and here's my list: theoretical physics (field theory, CFT, exact solutions), mathematics (real and functional analysis), and philosophy of science (demarcation, methodology, ontology).
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20 / F / Planet Earth
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Posted 4/16/17
I'm a first year university Chemist!!~~~~~
Wooooooo
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21 / F / The Cat Empire
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Posted 4/16/17 , edited 4/16/17
Geology and anthropology!
Posted 4/16/17 , edited 4/16/17

auroraloose wrote:

ninjitsuko wrote:
wrath products


This is going in my list of great misspellings, along with "fury creatures" and "office horus".


Aha.. Sorry about that, early morning typings after a long concert. I've corrected it.
What's kind of funny is that I've corrected people for the same misspelling numerous times throughout the years and figured that I'd get it right, even on auto-pilot. I was proven incorrect.

I remember doing a fair amount of analysis throughout the graduate program I was in. Some of my peers struggled with Hilbert space (especially holomorphic functions or Sturm-Liouville theory problems). It does appear there are a few intersections where our topics of interests do intersect. I try to keep myself as concurrent and up to date with any new theories or views regarding pre-existing ones just to keep my mind still ticking (not like I don't already take statistical data from the field [as in, various day to day activities] and use differentiation to find derivatives...). It's always good to see another person who has some mathematical inclinations online.
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28 / F / The margins
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Posted 4/16/17

ninjitsuko wrote:


auroraloose wrote:

ninjitsuko wrote:
wrath products


This is going in my list of great misspellings, along with "fury creatures" and "office horus".


Aha.. Sorry about that, early morning typings after a long concert. I've corrected it.




No, it doesn't bother me - it's great. Leave it. Though few people know wreath products are a thing, so I suppose leaving it would give the impression that "wrath products" are a thing.
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Posted 4/16/17
Physiology, as applied to (and studied in the context of) exercise science and nutrition

Chemistry (really broad, I know, but I've only taken through the second course at college for general education purposes)

Those are the main ones, I guess. I enjoy math, but I'm not very good about it, and although I am trying to study a bit of economics, I don't know enough to say whether I will like it or not.
Posted 4/16/17

auroraloose wrote:
No, it doesn't bother me - it's great. Leave it. Though few people know wreath products are a thing, so I suppose leaving it would give the impression that "wrath products" are a thing.


"Wrath products" would have something to do with a mathematician in the corner of the room with a whiteboard, screaming at the top of their lungs about improper transformations in their matrices.
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