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Favorite Science Field
Posted 4/16/17 , edited 4/16/17

Dark_Alma wrote:


Ashscot wrote:

Biology, geology, physiology, and anthropology are my favorites. I loved taking these kinda classes.


Do you have a favorite type of geology? Structural, geophysics, geochemistry, sedimentology, stratigraphy? Or have you just taken the fun intro classes like Historical geology and Physical geology?


I would have to say that stratigraphy is my favorite, mainly biostratigraphy.
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Posted 4/16/17 , edited 4/16/17

Ashscot wrote:


Dark_Alma wrote:


Ashscot wrote:

Biology, geology, physiology, and anthropology are my favorites. I loved taking these kinda classes.


Do you have a favorite type of geology? Structural, geophysics, geochemistry, sedimentology, stratigraphy? Or have you just taken the fun intro classes like Historical geology and Physical geology?


I would have to say that stratigraphy is my favorite, mainly biostratigraphy.


Limestones... *shudders* They are my least favorite sedimentary rock...

Edit: My favorite stratigraphy subfield is Magnetostratigraphic, or using the magnetic poles to deduce what you are looking at. What I like about this over biostrat is that the pole switch is worldwide, but some creatures only lived in certain parts of the world. However, in thinner sections, biostrat proves superior as the lifespan of the animals were generally much shorter.
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Posted 4/16/17 , edited 4/16/17

Fozzles wrote:


AHAHAHAHAHAHAHAH I appreciate your sympathy but getting intoxicated is not how i'd define a fun time so i'm like anti-alcohol.

So is structural geology what you studied/are studying? or is it something more broad or vague?


I am just a geoscientist. I have taken a lot of classes on igneous, metamorphic and sedimentary rocks, as well as subfields such as geochemistry, geophysics, geomorphology, planetary geology and seismology. I also have a good bit of advanced field work in which I head out as a group and measure strikes and dips, as well as note general composition of the rocks. This allows me to assume what is underneath the surface as well as draw out a surface topological map.

I remember coming into the field thinking it would be easy. I was so young, so naive.
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Posted 4/16/17 , edited 4/16/17

Dark_Alma wrote:


Fozzles wrote:


AHAHAHAHAHAHAHAH I appreciate your sympathy but getting intoxicated is not how i'd define a fun time so i'm like anti-alcohol.

So is structural geology what you studied/are studying? or is it something more broad or vague?


I am just a geoscientist. I have taken a lot of classes on igneous, metamorphic and sedimentary rocks, as well as subfields such as geochemistry, geophysics, geomorphology, planetary geology and seismology. I also have a good bit of advanced field work in which I head out as a group and measure strikes and dips, as well as note general composition of the rocks. This allows me to assume what is underneath the surface as well as draw out a surface topological map.

I remember coming into the field thinking it would be easy. I was so young, so naive.


Long words, had to google them all @[email protected];;
I think I'm being naive but it kinda does sound easy T_T forgive me for underestimating your job
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Posted 4/16/17 , edited 4/16/17

Fozzles wrote:


Dark_Alma wrote:

I am just a geoscientist. I have taken a lot of classes on igneous, metamorphic and sedimentary rocks, as well as subfields such as geochemistry, geophysics, geomorphology, planetary geology and seismology. I also have a good bit of advanced field work in which I head out as a group and measure strikes and dips, as well as note general composition of the rocks. This allows me to assume what is underneath the surface as well as draw out a surface topological map.

I remember coming into the field thinking it would be easy. I was so young, so naive.


Long words, had to google them all @[email protected];;
I think I'm being naive but it kinda does sound easy T_T forgive me for underestimating your job


There is no reason to be angry about it! It definitely looks easy from the outside! There is so much you need to learn though. Doing it in practice is hard too! I am currently (as of right now) working on a paper called A Comparison of Ophiolite Pseudo Stratigraphy and Spreading Rate. It is very fun, but has taken me almost 2 years to finish!

Geology, in a way is a lot like pharmacy school. You have to memorize so many aspects of every thing. I will give you an example.


So, what do you do with all this information? Well, a rock is formed by 2 or more minerals (in some cases 10+, all if which you need to know and be able to identify). By finding the minerals, you can tell where it formed, how it formed, the process in which it formed, how weathered it is, how far it may have traveled, the history of the area... and about 100 more things that I don't feel like covering.

Mind you, I only know about 900 of these main minerals out of 5300 known. I still have a lot of work to do. That is just basic geology! Then you get into fun stuff like structure. More words and more mind fucking!
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Posted 4/16/17 , edited 4/16/17
Biomolecular Engineering
Biophysical chemistry

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Posted 4/16/17 , edited 4/16/17

Dark_Alma wrote:


There is no reason to be angry about it! It definitely looks easy from the outside! There is so much you need to learn though. Doing it in practice is hard too! I am currently (as of right now) working on a paper called A Comparison of Ophiolite Pseudo Stratigraphy and Spreading Rate. It is very fun, but has taken me almost 2 years to finish!

Geology, in a way is a lot like pharmacy school. You have to memorize so many aspects of every thing. I will give you an example.


So, what do you do with all this information? Well, a rock is formed by 2 or more minerals (in some cases 10+, all if which you need to know and be able to identify). By finding the minerals, you can tell where it formed, how it formed, the process in which it formed, how weathered it is, how far it may have traveled, the history of the area... and about 100 more things that I don't feel like covering.

Mind you, I only know about 900 of these main minerals out of 5300 known. I still have a lot of work to do. That is just basic geology! Then you get into fun stuff like structure. More words and more mind fucking!



Wow, I literally only understood Potassium aluminium silicate, have mercy on my small brain D:
I take back my naive comment - it is definitely a mind boggling subject, good luck with your paper tho
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Posted 4/16/17 , edited 4/16/17

Fozzles wrote:

Wow, I literally only understood Potassium aluminium silicate, have mercy on my small brain D:
I take back my naive comment - it is definitely a mind boggling subject, good luck with your paper tho


Do what my friend does when I start speaking in geology. Speak in pharmacy. Then we both say bullshit that the other has no idea about!
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Posted 4/16/17 , edited 4/16/17

7142255338 wrote:

Biomolecular Engineering
Biophysical chemistry



Biomolecular Engineering is an emerging discipline at the interface of molecular biology, biophysical chemistry, and chemical engineering — whose express purpose is developing novel molecular tools, materials and approaches that are the focal point of applied and basic research within academia, industry and medicine.

I... what am I reading? What the hell is a novel molecular tool?
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Posted 4/16/17 , edited 4/16/17

Dark_Alma wrote:


Fozzles wrote:

Wow, I literally only understood Potassium aluminium silicate, have mercy on my small brain D:
I take back my naive comment - it is definitely a mind boggling subject, good luck with your paper tho


Do what my friend does when I start speaking in geology. Speak in pharmacy. Then we both say bullshit that the other has no idea about!


XDDDDDD
So the equivalent to that is like me saying:
Recently i had to write a lab report of the manufacture of aspirin where we had to decide what constituents would be most suitable to make a stable preparation, this included bulking components like lactose and micro-crystalline cellulose which should be at a lab grade so that we know how big the particles are and if they're sufficient as they'd have good flow characteristics. Other components are required like disintegrants which allow rapid dissolution of tablets are due to the breakage of cohesive forces holding the components together. Lubricants are also used which reduce friction and aid in the smooth ejection of the tablet from the die, in the compression machine. Finally, glidants are used in small quantities (around 0.5% of the tablet mixture) and silicone dioxide is a perfect example of something used in practice all over the UK, in industry. A glidant's purpose is to 'coat' the tablet to improve flow and reduce interparticle friction.
That's just something i remember doing for a project D:

Can you tell I want to work in a lab as an industrial pharmacist? xD
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Posted 4/16/17 , edited 4/17/17

Fozzles wrote:


XDDDDDD
So the equivalent to that is like me saying:
Recently i had to write a lab report of the manufacture of aspirin where we had to decide what constituents would be most suitable to make a stable preparation, this included bulking components like lactose and micro-crystalline cellulose which should be at a lab grade so that we know how big the particles are and if they're sufficient as they'd have good flow characteristics. Other components are required like disintegrants which allow rapid dissolution of tablets are due to the breakage of cohesive forces holding the components together. Lubricants are also used which reduce friction and aid in the smooth ejection of the tablet from the die, in the compression machine. Finally, glidants are used in small quantities (around 0.5% of the tablet mixture) and silicone dioxide is a perfect example of something used in practice all over the UK, in industry. A glidant's purpose is to 'coat' the tablet to improve flow and reduce interparticle friction.
That's just something i remember doing for a project D:

Can you tell I want to work in a lab as an industrial pharmacist? xD


Haha, you definitely seem like you would fit into one of those labs well! I got the gist of what you were saying, but as for the processes and whatnot, completely over my head. I would argue it is like that for every major. Get anyone from outside your major to talk about the details and they will be like what?

Minus business. That shit is easy and everyone can do it.
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Posted 4/16/17 , edited 4/17/17

Flying_Sea_Turtle wrote:

Meteorology, it's a love/hate relationship.


I was a member of my middle schools meteorology club. I was the only member! I used to want to be a storm chaser. Then I decided to change it up when I got to high school, and again in university.
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Posted 4/16/17 , edited 4/17/17

Dark_Alma wrote:


Haha, you definitely seem like you would fit into one of those labs well! I got the gist of what you were saying, but as for the processes and whatnot, completely over my head. I would argue it is like that for every major. Get anyone from outside your major to talk about the details and they will be like what?

Minus business. That shit is easy and everyone can do it.


Hahaha thank you
I wish i could say business is easy but i'm rubbish at the subject so keep me within arms reach of science and maths, and i'll be in my optimum environment ;D
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Posted 4/16/17 , edited 4/17/17
Physics
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