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Post Reply first round off french election done, next round on may 7th
qwueri 
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Posted 4/24/17

octorockandroll wrote:

I mean I agree with you but how is that more of an inappropriate comparison than comparing adopting similar policies as another country to WWII?


I'm not promoting one idea as worse than the other, they can both exist as terrible ideas in the same space.
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Posted 4/24/17

redokami wrote:
do you think humans are some special case, and can not be like animals?
edit: we literally had multiple species of humans a tsome point in history, do you not think some of that dna has been passed down?
its confusing having to say "like animals" we really are animals, humans just have this superiority complex tbh , we shit, we eat, we mate lol, we just generally are smarter than other species


The reason why you are wrong is because of the principle of independent assortment. If you took an introductory class in genetics, then you would have learned about it. The genes that correspond to skin color and facial features--which we associate with "race"--do not sort with those for intelligence during reproduction.
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Posted 4/24/17 , edited 4/25/17

qwueri wrote:


Rujikin wrote:

Le Pen is France's last hope. Germany and the EU is killing France with their horrible policies.


I hope the French don't surrender to Germany a second time in under a century.


I'm not sure how good an idea it is to juxtapose anyone with Jean de Arc, considering how her campaign ended.


The French were still better off after she was around than before. Besides why not die for the country you love?
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Posted 4/24/17 , edited 4/24/17
I think Le Pen will pull an upset. She has the momentum of Western Democracies voting in anti-establishment candidates and supporting anti-status quo policies (i.e Brexit and Trump), plus France's economy is still troubled. The last thing down and out people want to hear is promises of more of the status quo and the political establishments across the Western World have been quite deaf lately.
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Posted 4/25/17

kevz_210 wrote:

I think Le Pen will pull an upset. She has the momentum of Western Democracies voting in anti-establishment candidates and supporting anti-status quo policies (i.e Brexit and Trump), plus France's economy is still troubled. The last thing down and out people want to hear is promises of more of the status quo and the political establishments across the Western World have been quite deaf lately.


Not to mention all the terrorist attacks.
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Posted 4/25/17 , edited 4/25/17
Macron's policies are those of the establishment, but his rhetoric is fresh and new. His political party is only a year old.


For the first time in the history of the last three French republics, the two front-runners in the presidential election deny belonging to the right or the left, or even the center, of the political spectrum.

Mr. Macron says he doesn’t belong to the traditional political spectrum either. He refuses to be called left-wing, much less socialist, but balks just as much at being labeled right-wing. Campaign posters for his party, En Marche! (Onward!), tout the slogan “France must be a chance for all.”

Instead of embodying the traditional left-right polarity, the two leading candidates of this election embody a polarity between populism and liberalism, broadly understood.


Macron is liberal in the original (philosophical) sense, meaning he believes in individual liberties in a way that cuts across the left-right divide. He is liberal as progressives are, but also "liberal" as conservatives are, as the term "liberal" is used outside the US.

Regardless of how they feel about Macron, most voters will vote for him simply because he is not Le Pen.


As soon as polls in France closed Sunday for the first round of voting in the presidential election, a very uniquely French thing happened: Virtually all of the defeated presidential candidates and other political leaders promptly coalesced around centrist Emmanuel Macron, who faces off against far-right populist Marine Le Pen on May 7.

The endorsements came quickly, and they were notably enthusiastic. And yet they were less about Macron as a politician and more about conveying a simple message to the French voting public: Le Pen and her National Front pose an existential threat to the fundamental values of the French state and must be thwarted at all costs.

The French have a term for when politicians from across the spectrum unite to block the far right from attaining power: “Republican Front.” In an interview before the election, one French official described that type of post-election unity as a “firewall” against the far right taking power.


http://www.vox.com/world/2017/4/24/15408742/marine-le-pen-firewall-politicians-republican-front-stop-far-right
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Posted 4/25/17

mittemeyer wrote:

Macron's policies are those of the establishment, but his rhetoric is fresh and new. His political party is only a year old.


For the first time in the history of the last three French republics, the two front-runners in the presidential election deny belonging to the right or the left, or even the center, of the political spectrum.

Mr. Macron says he doesn’t belong to the traditional political spectrum either. He refuses to be called left-wing, much less socialist, but balks just as much at being labeled right-wing. Campaign posters for his party, En Marche! (Onward!), tout the slogan “France must be a chance for all.”

Instead of embodying the traditional left-right polarity, the two leading candidates of this election embody a polarity between populism and liberalism, broadly understood.


Macron is liberal in the original (philosophical) sense, meaning he believes in individual liberties in a way that cuts across the left-right divide. He is liberal as progressives are, but also "liberal" as conservatives are, as the term "liberal" is used outside the US.

Regardless of how they feel about Macron, most voters will vote for him simply because he is not Le Pen.


As soon as polls in France closed Sunday for the first round of voting in the presidential election, a very uniquely French thing happened: Virtually all of the defeated presidential candidates and other political leaders promptly coalesced around centrist Emmanuel Macron, who faces off against far-right populist Marine Le Pen on May 7.

The endorsements came quickly, and they were notably enthusiastic. And yet they were less about Macron as a politician and more about conveying a simple message to the French voting public: Le Pen and her National Front pose an existential threat to the fundamental values of the French state and must be thwarted at all costs.

The French have a term for when politicians from across the spectrum unite to block the far right from attaining power: “Republican Front.” In an interview before the election, one French official described that type of post-election unity as a “firewall” against the far right taking power.


http://www.vox.com/world/2017/4/24/15408742/marine-le-pen-firewall-politicians-republican-front-stop-far-right


Wasn't he like the former finance minister of the current administration?
qwueri 
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Posted 4/25/17

Rujikin wrote:

The French were still better off after she was around than before. Besides why not die for the country you love?


Yes, why not put a woman in the same position as one who was burned at the stake as a witch for leading a violent revolt at the behest of voices from God?
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Posted 4/25/17

qwueri wrote:


Rujikin wrote:

The French were still better off after she was around than before. Besides why not die for the country you love?


Yes, why not put a woman in the same position as one who was burned at the stake as a witch for leading a violent revolt at the behest of voices from God?


You obviously know nothing about Joan of Arc. At least read the Wikipedia entry about her before replying acting as if you know anything about her.

The French were losing to the British despite having better equipped troops and more of them. Many times they fled before even getting into battle and had very poor morale. Joan inspired a losing garrison to attack the English and follow through with the attack. They took some losses but stomped the English army, both literally and figuratively. She inspired a huge following and pretty much had her own army she led across France winning battle after battle while the nobles and aristocrats failed in most of their efforts. Eventually she wanted to retake the capital but the nobles didn't want her to do it and claim the glory. Eventually she got sick of the nobles and started disobeying them. They didn't like that so they came up with bullshit charges, that she was working with the Russians, and had her executed. The nobles didn't want her to dethrone their worthless asses.
qwueri 
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Posted 4/25/17 , edited 4/25/17

Rujikin wrote:

You obviously know nothing about Joan of Arc. At least read the Wikipedia entry about her before replying acting as if you know anything about her.

The French were losing to the British despite having better equipped troops and more of them. Many times they fled before even getting into battle and had very poor morale. Joan inspired a losing garrison to attack the English and follow through with the attack. They took some losses but stomped the English army, both literally and figuratively. She inspired a huge following and pretty much had her own army she led across France winning battle after battle while the nobles and aristocrats failed in most of their efforts. Eventually she wanted to retake the capital but the nobles didn't want her to do it and claim the glory. Eventually she got sick of the nobles and started disobeying them. They didn't like that so they came up with bullshit charges, that she was working with the Russians, and had her executed. The nobles didn't want her to dethrone their worthless asses.


So a slightly longer version of what I said with no compelling reason to compare her with a politician, gotcha. And that's not even getting into who you'd be comparing to the English or how she basically got screwed over by her own people.
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Posted 4/25/17
Aiii! So far my theory is 6 for 6! CANT STOP ME NOW!

The obvious people chose Le Pen, everyone else chose Macron.
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Posted 4/25/17

MysticGon wrote
Wasn't he like the former finance minister of the current administration?


Yes.
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Posted 4/25/17

mittemeyer wrote:


MysticGon wrote
Wasn't he like the former finance minister of the current administration?


Yes.


Can't get more establishment than that.

It's basically Hillary v Trump gender swapped.
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Posted 4/25/17
Not sure why are we comparing these people to Trump and Hillary in all honesty.
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21 / M / Imoutoland!
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Posted 4/25/17
Not sure why are we comparing these people to Trump and Hillary in all honesty.
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