Post Reply OZ Coppers think they are the NSA
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Posted 4/28/17

CANBERRA, Australia (AP) -- Australian police revealed on Friday that an officer broke the country's contentious new metadata laws by illegally accessing a journalist's phone records to identify an anonymous source.
http://hosted.ap.org/dynamic/stories/A/AS_AUSTRALIA_METADATA_ASOL-?SITE=AP&SECTION=HOME&TEMPLATE=DEFAULT
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21 / M / Oppai Hell
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Posted 4/28/17 , edited 4/29/17
Copper is Australian slang for policemen?
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Posted 4/28/17 , edited 4/29/17

PeripheralVisionary wrote:

Copper is Australian slang for policemen?


Correct. Bloody coppas.

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Posted 4/28/17 , edited 4/30/17

PeripheralVisionary wrote:

Copper is Australian slang for policemen?


More than just Aussie slang, it's where the term "cops" comes from, from the bronze or copper colored badges of patrolmen.
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Posted 4/29/17 , edited 4/29/17

Tyrconnell wrote:


PeripheralVisionary wrote:

Copper is Australian slang for policemen?


More than just Aussie slang, it's where the term "cops" comes from, from the bronze or copper colored badges of patrolmen.


Learn something new every day.
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Posted 4/29/17 , edited 4/30/17

MrAnimeSK wrote:


Tyrconnell wrote:


PeripheralVisionary wrote:

Copper is Australian slang for policemen?


More than just Aussie slang, it's where the term "cops" comes from, from the bronze or copper colored badges of patrolmen.


Learn something new every day.


And on the subject of slang terms, It's a tribute to Robert Peel and his dedication to forming a professional police force that in Ireland and Wales the police are (not so often as in the past) termed "Peelers" and the London Metropolitan Police are called "Bobbies"
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Posted 4/29/17
And in Scotland we call them the "POLIS" (pronounced Pole-iss)
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Posted 4/29/17

PeripheralVisionary wrote:

Copper is Australian slang for policemen?


Americans said it first. A long time ago. Was slang for police.

Old movie clip. Rico talks on the phone to the police...

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TgGngBampYg
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Posted 4/30/17
I could of really been a larrikin and called them with "Blue Heelers"
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Posted 4/30/17

Jamming777 wrote:

I could of really been a larrikin and called them with "Blue Heelers"


So, in Australia, is calling a police officer a "Blue Heeler" a derogatory name?

In the U.S., in the 60's, 70's, and I think the 80's too, it was "Pigs." Pig was the derogatory nick name used when addressing or talking to a police officer.

I'm not sure what derogatory name is used these days. I've only heard, 'cops' and ''po-po.' I don't know of any other nick names used these days, and 'cops' isn't derogatory any more. I'm not sure about po-po, though...
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Posted 4/30/17

DeadlyOats wrote:


Jamming777 wrote:

I could of really been a larrikin and called them with "Blue Heelers"


So, in Australia, is calling a police officer a "Blue Heeler" a derogatory name?

In the U.S., in the 60's, 70's, and I think the 80's too, it was "Pigs." Pig was the derogatory nick name used when addressing or talking to a police officer.

I'm not sure what derogatory name is used these days. I've only heard, 'cops' and ''po-po.' I don't know of any other nick names used these days, and 'cops' isn't derogatory any more. I'm not sure about po-po, though...


'Blue Heelers' is not generally regarded as derogatory in the vernacular of being loyal, strong, trustworthy and unreservedly relentless in pursuit and capture of prey.

OTOH, if you use the context of 'dogs of the state', then calling the police 'Blue Heelers' could be considered derogatory, similarly to calling your defence force 'dogs of the military'.

Language is a dangerous tool of propaganda to sway public sentiment. For decades our Police have been officially designated as a state public service - 'Police Service' - and yet the media seem to conveniently forget that and regress back to referring to them as 'Police Force' whenever it suits a narrative to push current mood shift towards 'strong political leadership with zero tolerance'.

Sound familiar?

Also, 'Copper', if you recall was used not specifically as a colloquialism by 'Americans' before Australia, but rather by immigrant Irish to whatever country they arrived in, whether that be America, Australia, or wherever.

While it may have been popularised and thought by some to refer to the copper badges worn by some constabulary, it dates much further back - here's some etymological info from IrishCentral:

Irish Gaelic was a secret language in Éire, which was once an Ireland riddled with foreign spies, and so it was a language to keep the copper (the catcher, the thinker) from catching on. Cop comes from ceapaim, and means "I catch, think etc." You try to keep the cop from figuring out your racket, or your reacaireacht, your "dealing, selling or gossiping."
http://www.irishcentral.com/opinion/others/dirty-irish-gaelic-words-litter-new-york-city-slang-how-a-lot-of-american-words-for-vice-come-from-irish-88839767-238023821

While on the topic of etymology, while you could _have_ been a larrikin,
you may reconsider wanting to be associated with that term once you realise the origins of larrikinism was not one of jolly lighthearted banter and a 'lad about town' nod to innocent mischief,
but rather, it put you at or beyond the lowest rung of society, equivalent to an anarchic, brutish, violent, uncivilised lout with zero respect for authority, pretty much like the contemporary depiction of 'housos' today, popularised by Paul Fenech's TV series, or the ultraviolence depicted in A Clockwork Orange.
The romanticised 'larrikin" depicted in the "Barry McKenzie" films is a tame innocent, & a far cry from the origin of the word.
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