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Post Reply Bestbuy and FBI
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Posted 5/7/17 , edited 5/8/17
http://www.ibtimes.com/best-buys-geek-squad-fbi-more-connected-previously-suspected-2506335

this is an article from 1 month ago or so

so a doctor was found out to be a pedophile.. it's nothing new anymore (just hope the guy is not a pediatrician)


anyway.. this is a privacy concern though

Geek Squad = FBI informants

people still take their pc/laptops to Bestbuy for service ? with the amount of personal information people have on their electronics now a day.. i would think they would DIY when problems arise

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Posted 5/7/17 , edited 5/10/17
This has been going on for a while. My friend works at BestBuy in the Geek Squad. Employees would look through peoples hard drives for music and nudes of hot girls. Non-technical people have no clue. They reported any illegal findings to authorities often.

You have no privacy, the best option is to remove the hard drive and not break the law. It is surprising what stuff people leave on their hard drives.
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Posted 5/7/17 , edited 5/10/17
When it comes to child pornography, I believe you are required to by US law to report it if you happen to find it. It's surprising that the employees were being compensated as informants, but even if this relationship didn't exist, Best Buy would have been legally liable if its employees had found cp and not reported it.
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Posted 5/7/17 , edited 5/10/17

dulun18 wrote:

Geek Squad = FBI informants


This is the law. If you discover that someone is guilty of a crime, and you do not report it to the authorities, you are an "accessory after the fact" and can be charged as though you had actively assisted in the crime.

Sometimes this is nothing to be worried about. If you know your friend Joey bought some speakers that "fell off the back of a truck," that's not a big deal. But if you know your friend Joey trades naked pictures of little boys with his buddies, well, that can make you a felony sex offender just like Joey and all his paedo friends.

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Posted 5/7/17 , edited 5/10/17

cdarklock wrote:
This is the law. If you discover that someone is guilty of a crime, and you do not report it to the authorities, you are an "accessory after the fact" and can be charged as though you had actively assisted in the crime.


Well, the problem in this case in particular is that the evidence of said crime wasn't just set as the desktop background. They had to search for it. At which point that is a violation of the Fourth Amendment as indicated. The FBI is essentially paying Bestbuy to let them get around pesky things like search warrants. Regardless of what people think of a particular crime itself they can't just go tossing the Constitution in the bin to pursue it.

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Posted 5/7/17 , edited 5/8/17

runec wrote:


cdarklock wrote:
This is the law. If you discover that someone is guilty of a crime, and you do not report it to the authorities, you are an "accessory after the fact" and can be charged as though you had actively assisted in the crime.


Well, the problem in this case in particular is that the evidence of said crime wasn't just set as the desktop background. They had to search for it. At which point that is a violation of the Fourth Amendment as indicated. The FBI is essentially paying Bestbuy to let them get around pesky things like search warrants. Regardless of what people think of a particular crime itself they can't just go tossing the Constitution in the bin to pursue it.



exactly.

This isn't "Oh I happed to learn he's a criminal and reported it"

they are actively violating people's privacy and even admit to searching into the guts of the computer to try to find stuff.

What kind of person the doctor is aside it's a crime to just dig through people's privacy and report it like that.
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Posted 5/7/17 , edited 5/10/17

runec wrote:


cdarklock wrote:
This is the law. If you discover that someone is guilty of a crime, and you do not report it to the authorities, you are an "accessory after the fact" and can be charged as though you had actively assisted in the crime.


Well, the problem in this case in particular is that the evidence of said crime wasn't just set as the desktop background. They had to search for it. At which point that is a violation of the Fourth Amendment as indicated. The FBI is essentially paying Bestbuy to let them get around pesky things like search warrants. Regardless of what people think of a particular crime itself they can't just go tossing the Constitution in the bin to pursue it.



Mm hmm. There's a difference between happening to find something while troubleshooting a problem you were hired to fix, and deliberately poking around looking for something in a way that is not necessary to do the job the customer asked for.
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Posted 5/7/17 , edited 5/8/17
Sooo delete anything sensitive on your computer before handing it over to someone else. Good to know. But yeah, I really wouldn't have advertised this if I were Best Buy or the FBI.
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Posted 5/7/17 , edited 5/8/17

Mishio1 wrote:
Sooo delete anything sensitive on your computer before handing it over to someone else. Good to know. But yeah, I really wouldn't have advertised this if I were Best Buy or the FBI.


if FBI is really helping Geek Squad, they can probably find your deleted stuff regardless.
unless you physically remove the drive and destroy it like hillary did
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Posted 5/7/17 , edited 5/8/17

lorreen wrote:
Mm hmm. There's a difference between happening to find something while troubleshooting a problem you were hired to fix, and deliberately poking around looking for something in a way that is not necessary to do the job the customer asked for.


Especially in this case as forensic / file recovery software would have had to have been used then the recovered files sifted through. Looks like its further complicated by the fact the FBI then performed two searches of the computer themselves with no warrant, then lied to a judge to get a warrant and tried to build a case retroactively.

The tech that "accidentally" found the image meanwhile knew he could get $500 a pop for anything he found on customers computers.



Metazoxan wrote:
they are actively violating people's privacy and even admit to searching into the guts of the computer to try to find stuff.

What kind of person the doctor is aside it's a crime to just dig through people's privacy and report it like that.


It's also a terrible way to try and build a case as the FBI seemed to realize. If you don't do this stuff by the book the evidence gets tossed out of court anyway.

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Posted 5/7/17 , edited 5/8/17

runec wrote:

Well, the problem in this case in particular is that the evidence of said crime wasn't just set as the desktop background. They had to search for it. At which point that is a violation of the Fourth Amendment...


When you bring Geek Squad your electronics, you explicitly authorise them to access all of it. It is also explicitly stated in their terms and conditions that they may report evidence of any crime to law enforcement. So you literally sign a contract that says "fix my shit, search it all you want, and tell the cops about anything illegal."

Even if the FBI is "employing" Geek Squad as a de facto arm of the government (which they're not, as per Federal circuit court decisions I don't feel like looking up), you sign a contract that lets them do what they're doing. Just like when a police officer says "may I search your vehicle?" and you say "why yes you may." Anything he finds isn't a fourth amendment violation, because you have consented to the search.
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Posted 5/7/17 , edited 5/8/17
What a title and what an article
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Posted 5/7/17 , edited 5/8/17

cdarklock wrote:
When you bring Geek Squad your electronics, you explicitly authorise them to access all of it. It is also explicitly stated in their terms and conditions that they may report evidence of any crime to law enforcement. So you literally sign a contract that says "fix my shit, search it all you want, and tell the cops about anything illegal."

Even if the FBI is "employing" Geek Squad as a de facto arm of the government (which they're not, as per Federal circuit court decisions I don't feel like looking up), you sign a contract that lets them do what they're doing. Just like when a police officer says "may I search your vehicle?" and you say "why yes you may." Anything he finds isn't a fourth amendment violation, because you have consented to the search.


No, that is not how this works. You cannot sign your Constitutional protections over in a service contract to a retail store. Best Buy is not an officer of the law no matter what their contract says and they cannot perform a search on behalf of the government. There is no probable cause and they need a warrant. Again, this case isn't one where he just had it set to his desktop background. Finding this required a forensic search. You can't do that. The FBI knows this. That's why they lied to a judge to obtain a warrant for something they already found and then tried to cover it up.

The exploratory evidence in this case revealed that the FBI and Best Buy were working closely in tandem ( despite the public denial of both ) and that Best Buy actually has and actively uses special software to search customer's computers for illegal materials. That violates the Fourth Amendment. It also not only jeopardizes this case but retroactively jeopardizes EVERY case that has gone through the FBI via Best Buy.

By trying to skirt the rules they not only risk getting this case tossed out but every case that's already been tried with evidence from this program.
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Posted 5/7/17 , edited 5/8/17
This is why you should always fix your own computers. Or fully encrypt your drive so NO ONE can access it.
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Posted 5/7/17 , edited 5/8/17
they'll have to keep my PC all week to sift through all the porn but there wont be any kids lol
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