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Post Reply Bestbuy and FBI
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Posted 5/7/17 , edited 5/8/17

Rujikin wrote:
This is why you should always fix your own computers.


Honestly, even just the amount of money you save by knowing how to at least put together and troubleshoot a standard PC. It should be standard learning in school.

Geek Squad can and will rob you blind over an issue that could be easily fixed in 5-10 minutes by someone with general computer knowledge. We're talking about a lot that will charge you $50 to walk you through setting up your email and probably find some reason why you need their $100 tune up service and a $75 virus protection plan while they're at it. -.-

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Posted 5/7/17 , edited 5/8/17
There is a difference between reporting a crime you came across and breaking into a house because your neighbor is obviously a serial killer. Legally wise, I find it inconsistent for this to be a legal way to circumvent protection that FBI would not have access to without legal stuff such as obtaining a search warrant for to physically confiscate your computer.

A contract is of course a legal reinforcement to avoid liability for various companies, but you cannot use legally backed documents to break the law protecting them in the first place (or should not), especially such an act in of itself. The day we enforce company policy over individual rights is the day that the final nail of coffin for liberty.

The FBI appears to be paying off members to thoroughly search computers far beyond what their job would entail, and I believe there already laws about commissioning civilians to bypass restrictions on police, which basically is that a police officer cannot really do so.
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Posted 5/7/17 , edited 5/8/17
I would understand this argument if Best Buy employees were reporting on shit like tax fraud, illegal drug trades, etc. But are we really going to go into semantics over the constitutional rights of people who sexually exploit innocent children? That blows my mind. Last I checked, most constitutional rights don't cover prisoners, and that's where these people belong.
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Posted 5/7/17 , edited 5/8/17
There is a difference between reporting crime and going vigilante and the Best Buy folks seem to simply been reporting the crime. Like if you ask someone to fix your plumbing and they see your dead hooker collection they kind of have a responsibility to report that. Likewise I see no problem with paying people to report crimes. You see it all the time where the police will advertise money for tips on crimes.

If anything the lesson here should be don't sexually exploit children or else the geeks will get you.
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Posted 5/7/17 , edited 5/8/17

KellieDee wrote:

I would understand this argument if Best Buy employees were reporting on shit like tax fraud, illegal drug trades, etc. But are we really going to go into semantics over the constitutional rights of people who sexually exploit innocent children? That blows my mind. Last I checked, most constitutional rights don't cover prisoners, and that's where these people belong.


Certain constitutional rights do apply to prisoners and criminals, precisely to protect the rights of the entire populace. Denying rights on moral whims has never worked out, and it never will. It is too arbitrary.

That being said, there is a couple of things I find disconcerting about your post.

It is not "just semantics". There is nothing concerning language usage or any differing basic definitions, but the precise weighing of the method versus the results, utility versus inalienable rights. In short, in what ways can the government act in the betterment of society?

To backtrack, rights should apply to everyone by default, and you cannot retroactively take them away and say "Aha, they just so happen to be doing something illegal" without any of the legal wrangling that prevents an abuse of power by the local, state, and especially federal enforcement, which run the gamut of unlawful searches to commissioning of civilians to bypass said legal wrangling. In short, they may be denying him rights of privacy he had at the time, and then take them away at that time after they allegedly violated them in order to prove he committed a serious crime. The general constitutional law as explicit language towards this. You must have reason to believe a crime has been committed, and by that person, before you can actively search for evidence in private quarters.

It is okay if you believe in a society where a little less freedom and privacy would make the world safer from people like said perpetrator, but it is not quite that simple an argument to make, because the line would essentially be drawn by "What could people be doing", which is well...a scary thought in itself.



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Posted 5/7/17 , edited 5/8/17

runec wrote:


Rujikin wrote:
This is why you should always fix your own computers.


Honestly, even just the amount of money you save by knowing how to at least put together and troubleshoot a standard PC. It should be standard learning in school.

Geek Squad can and will rob you blind over an issue that could be easily fixed in 5-10 minutes by someone with general computer knowledge. We're talking about a lot that will charge you $50 to walk you through setting up your email and probably find some reason why you need their $100 tune up service and a $75 virus protection plan while they're at it. -.-



That would be good but... They did have that in my school and it was pretty bad. Like it was all outdated and most of it was for specific products.

Yeah best buy are thieves.
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Posted 5/7/17 , edited 5/8/17

runec wrote:

No, that is not how this works. You cannot sign your Constitutional protections over in a service contract to a retail store.


And you didn't. What you did was give your consent for a search. You are still protected from unreasonable search and seizure, but because you have consented to the search, it is not unreasonable.

The allegations being brought against Best Buy and the FBI in this scenario are bullshit. They're not working together, no laws have been broken, no rights have been violated, and the closest thing to "news" here is that corporate America doesn't fucking care about your privacy. And in other news, water is wet, fire is hot, and dead puppies aren't much fun.
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Posted 5/7/17 , edited 5/8/17
Does it say why they had his computer?

They could have been doing a basic Anti-Virus/Malware scan and saw something that looked a little fishy, and upon investigation found it to be CP. Unless all the facts are displayed, don't make assumptions.
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Posted 5/7/17 , edited 5/8/17

cdarklock wrote:
And you didn't. What you did was give your consent for a search. You are still protected from unreasonable search and seizure, but because you have consented to the search, it is not unreasonable.


Running forensic tools on every computer that comes across your bench is not reasonable nor is it even required to troubleshoot every computer. The image on this guy's computer was not even accessible by him without similar software which was not installed on his computer nor was it found to have been installed on his computer.



cdarklock wrote:
The allegations being brought against Best Buy and the FBI in this scenario are bullshit. They're not working together, no laws have been broken, no rights have been violated, and the closest thing to "news" here is that corporate America doesn't fucking care about your privacy. And in other news, water is wet, fire is hot, and dead puppies aren't much fun.


No, they aren't. Again, it was discovered during the exploratory part of the trial that they were working together and that Best Buy specifically has software it was using on every computer to search for any potentially illegal material. Which they would then be paid for. It's not like an officer asking you to consent to a search of your car. It's like you taking your car to the shop and the mechanic pulling apart the interior and sweeping it for DNA.



Ravenstein wrote:
There is a difference between reporting crime and going vigilante and the Best Buy folks seem to simply been reporting the crime. Like if you ask someone to fix your plumbing and they see your dead hooker collection they kind of have a responsibility to report that. Likewise I see no problem with paying people to report crimes. You see it all the time where the police will advertise money for tips on crimes.


This is more like you ask someone to fix your plumbing and they jackhammer the cement of the basement foundation specifically looking for dead hookers. Then they go and do that to everyone that hires them for a plumbing job regardless.

Also, again, for both of you: In this case the FBI lied to a judge to get a search warrant to retroactively find what they had already discovered then tried to cover it up. There is absolutely no need for the FBI to have done that unless they knew they were doing something that would not pass a legal test.



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Posted 5/7/17 , edited 5/8/17

VividDreamZ wrote:

This has been going on for a while. My friend works at BestBuy in the Geek Squad. Employees would look through peoples hard drives for music and nudes of hot girls. Non-technical people have no clue. They reported any illegal findings to authorities often.

You have no privacy, the best option is to remove the hard drive and not break the law. It is surprising what stuff people leave on their hard drives.


I guess my stash of furry porn is now known
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Posted 5/7/17 , edited 5/8/17

redokami wrote:


VividDreamZ wrote:

This has been going on for a while. My friend works at BestBuy in the Geek Squad. Employees would look through peoples hard drives for music and nudes of hot girls. Non-technical people have no clue. They reported any illegal findings to authorities often.

You have no privacy, the best option is to remove the hard drive and not break the law. It is surprising what stuff people leave on their hard drives.


I guess my stash of furry porn is now known


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Posted 5/7/17 , edited 5/8/17

keeton52 wrote:
Does it say why they had his computer?

They could have been doing a basic Anti-Virus/Malware scan and saw something that looked a little fishy, and upon investigation found it to be CP. Unless all the facts are displayed, don't make assumptions.


It wouldn't boot up. The file was found in the unallocated space of the drive. Discovering it would require running a recovery tool and then manually going through all the potentially recovered files looking for any potential picture data then looking at all of said pictures. According to the court docs Best Buy has a software tool specifically for this that they were running as a matter of course on every computer to try and find image data for the FBI.

Personally, if you give me a machine that won't boot up "run file recovery software then look at anything with an image file extension" is not on my troubleshooting list. I've done this sort of work before. If you did not have a tool that was specifically looking for and trying to discover image data you could potentially be looking at upwards of tens of thousands of files many with damaged file names and extensions from being overwritten. Data recovery is a huge pain in the ass. It's not something you just do for the fun of it.
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Posted 5/7/17 , edited 5/8/17

ronin99 wrote:


redokami wrote:


VividDreamZ wrote:

This has been going on for a while. My friend works at BestBuy in the Geek Squad. Employees would look through peoples hard drives for music and nudes of hot girls. Non-technical people have no clue. They reported any illegal findings to authorities often.

You have no privacy, the best option is to remove the hard drive and not break the law. It is surprising what stuff people leave on their hard drives.


I guess my stash of furry porn is now known




lol , also reminds me of when I used to cyber on my phone, full on detail paragraphs, and when I gave it to the guy at sprint to be fixed he saw the messages, raised his eyebrows and looked at my mom - I was like 19 -
cuz I just got a message and he was like "uh, your bf messaged you"
edit: it was my grandma actually , not my mom lol
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Posted 5/7/17 , edited 5/8/17

cdarklock wrote:



This is the law. If you discover that someone is guilty of a crime, and you do not report it to the authorities, you are an "accessory after the fact" and can be charged as though you had actively assisted in the crime.

Sometimes this is nothing to be worried about. If you know your friend Joey bought some speakers that "fell off the back of a truck," that's not a big deal. But if you know your friend Joey trades naked pictures of little boys with his buddies, well, that can make you a felony sex offender just like Joey and all his paedo friends.



Ahh an opinion ( or rather fact actually) that I can agree with.

Criminals are criminals regardless of how the evidence of their crimes was found. End of story.
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Posted 5/7/17 , edited 5/8/17
Best buy backup and data recovery services have agreements that you sign along with a two page contract that they can look at and search your data. this is to allow for copying the right data without having the customer sift through program and system files that are useless to them. all other services don't look for any data, but you can still come across something by accident during repair and then you're forced to report it for "accessory" reasons others stated. Recovery for dead drives is also sent offsite to a recovery team, separate from the "Precinct" locations you can visit.

as a side note, the opinion of GS agents from this article was mostly "how come the FBI doesn't pay us? who do we complain to?"
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