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Post Reply Outer space cultivation
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Posted 6/2/17 , edited 6/2/17
Alright, so what if you bring a large amount of oxygen into space?

For starters, you drip some red ink into the ocean, the first few drops are going to disperse quickly, but as the concentration of red ink gets higher and higher, assuming you get a whole tank of red ink(I am not asking you to pollute the ocean) essentially a small region of the sea would turn red and it would not disperse very fast.

Same thing for space, if you bring large amount of air to disperse in space, you should get a high concentration of air in a zone, assuming it is not captured by earth's gravity. As it escapes into the vast vaccum of space, you suck the air back in to recharge the concentration. So now you got like a pool of air in space circulating where you could enjoy it like southern California, plant some trees to turn carbon dioxide back to oxygen.

Let's not forget to add some water vapor to mediate the temperature.

Theoretically I am not sure how much air you need in space to reach the concentration gradient. Dropping red ink in water is easy, dropping air in space is another matter.
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Posted 6/2/17
I figured because of the complete lack of anything, unlike dropping ink into the sea where there's a bunch of water, it would still disperse pretty fast, wouldn't it?
Posted 6/2/17
no i think without a medium like water oxygen would just disperse too fast, you cant have a blob of oxygen in space without it diffusing. The ink is a liquid going into a liquid. The oxygen would be going into a vacuum. Also it would be insanely cold there, and lots of radiation. You gotta have some kind of dome or it wouldn't work imo
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Posted 6/2/17
Seems like similar logic to opening a refrigerator to cool down a room. Yes, if you might be able to pump enough air into a concentration that it wouldn't immediately disperse, but without something to contain that air the effort would be incredibly energy inefficient for the gain. Like the fridge producing more heat from the back-end than it could possibly heat a house, you'd likely run out of air before you ran got some significant air pocket.
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Posted 6/2/17
What ever is, you got to share. Far out there man, Far out!
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Posted 6/2/17
Ya, this one is hard, I just thought space should be filled with air, but since it isn't a closed space the air goes elsewhere. I guess the only mean is trapping the air in outer space with artificial gravity
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Posted 6/2/17

fredreload wrote:

Ya, this one is hard, I just thought space should be filled with air, but since it isn't a closed space the air goes elsewhere. I guess the only mean is trapping the air in outer space with artificial gravity


Even this wouldn't work well you have solar winds that would blow it away, add to the fact the required energy for this. You need shielding for radiation and both heat and cold space is both really hot and really cold depending on where you are. Also there is oxygen in space it is just really defused this is true of many elements like hydrogen and helium.

The easiest way to have breathable air in space because oxygen is actually toxic to human in it's pure form would be a habitat like the ISS. So you would want a habitat which also protects again heat and cold and radiation. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oxygen_toxicity
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Posted 6/2/17 , edited 6/2/17
While it doesn't occur naturally (the elements are too rare) with enough oxygen and nitrogen I don't see why you couldn't, theoretically speaking, use them to form a gas giant, thereby keeping your breathable air from dispersing too much.

That wouldn't be very efficient though.
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Posted 6/2/17 , edited 6/2/17
Space is too big. Way too big. There isn't enough normal matter (i.e. stuff we're made of) in the universe such that you could get a livable partial pressure of gases in space; the air would immediately disperse. The only thing available to create a chemical potential is gravity (or another force, but those get screened). I doubt the feasibility of a self-gravitating ball of breathable air, though I'd have to work out the calculation.

That seems like a fun question, actually: how big of a ball of air would you need for it to gravitationally cohere in space? The problem, of course, is that that's not feasible at all: It's a lot easier to have a big rock hold the air on its surface by gravity (i.e., an atmosphere).
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Posted 6/2/17
Air is dense. Space is a vaccum. It will be stretched infinitely thin until you manage to fill all of space with air.

Or it gets reabsorbed by earth.
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Posted 6/2/17
aliens
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Posted 6/2/17
Like my manz KG said Anything is POSSIBLE!!!
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Posted 6/2/17
Lol naw not really I agree with Rujikin. SPace vaccuum is on a whole nother level Idk if we can test this theory by putting water ina vaccum? and then not to mention the different denisyt matter of OXygen out in space and all LIke So imagine our Sun in our solor system if our sun was a bubble of Oxygen and we try to seep it out only to lets say concentrate only around venus or mercury It wont work. The air will spread everywhere to fast and at crazy directions to keep within the concentrated area of just our solar system.
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Posted 6/2/17
I can only suggest you find out why large concentrations of blood take longer to disperse in water.
Really, the whole field of fluid dynamics should be your primary starting place.
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Posted 6/2/17

fredreload wrote:

For starters, you drip some red ink into the ocean, the first few drops are going to disperse quickly, but as the concentration of red ink gets higher and higher, assuming you get a whole tank of red ink(I am not asking you to pollute the ocean) essentially a small region of the sea would turn red and it would not disperse very fast.



this is adorable and something i'd say in 4th grade but heres the thing

oceans water has mass and is made of particles. the red dye has to fight through those particles to disperse. we dont really think about that because of course molecules are tiny and we dont see this, but it happens

space is a vacuum. theres nothing for the air to fight through so it will almost instantly disperse out.

our bodies are held together by electromagnetic bonds, but the water and air in our cells are made of isnt, so the water will literally boil out of our bodies until we are dried up husks of flesh floating in space.

but still this is cute
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