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Post Reply US may "pull out" on UN Human Rights Council
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28 / F / SC
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Posted 6/6/17
i still just can't believe my little state's previous gov'nr from a ranky dank country town is a high all mighty ambassador now
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59 / M / USA
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Posted 6/6/17

moonhawk81 wrote:



December 7th, 1941. Being prior Navy, I am intimately familiar with that date--the date upon which Japan attacked the US with weapons constructed of steel, the majority of which had been supplied by. . .the US! So you see, a little more isolationism might have actually spared us the surprise attack at Pearl Harbor. But I'm no supporter of isolationism (please re-read my first post). My attitude is simply that you support your allies and don't support your enemies! It's a pretty simple approach, really, but something that the US seems to have trouble understanding. The US allows capitalism to become a political philosophy rather that relegating it to economic policy, and that's our big mistake. By accepting capitalism as political, we allow sales to our own enemies so long as they wear a thin veneer of alliance. How many allies do you really think we have in the Middle East? Yet we keep sending military and financial aid to the very countries that support and supply the terrorists who have attacked us. . .

Again, I repeat: Isolationism might not be the answer, but neither is feeding and financing a world full of people who want to kill us. The US should exit the UN, now.


And Japan attacked us, why? Because they felt they were being interfered with in their sphere of influence by the US and Great Britain (which in fact we were doing, rightfully or no). You might recall that our military was in fairly poor shape in comparison with the Axis powers, and isolationist policies contributed to that weakness.

Pulling out of the UN, or even the UN Human Rights Commission, nets us nothing in return. Likewise, isolationism nets us nothing other than increased anger from other countries. Like it or no, the world is there and we will need to respond to it. I agree we should support our allies and not our enemies - but there's more than one way to defeat an enemy, and some of our 'allies' are amazingly questionable.

I agree that capitalism as a political philosophy is flawed, but then most philosophies are flawed inherently. What's needed is a practical blend of capitalism, socialism, and policies intended to enhance the welfare of the US citizen and ultimately the rest of the world (by imitation if nothing else).

Incidentally, thanks for your service and your reply. I was almost in the Navy, but went Army instead. I find it interesting that we're discussing this on the 73rd anniversary of D-Day.

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☆Land of sweets☆
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Posted 6/6/17
UN...the same organization that put Saudi Arabia to lead the human rights council at least twice despite human rights being basically nonexistent, tried to ban anime and manga, and the same staff supposed to stop child-related crimes were themselves caught with child porn. we should have pulled from it long ago.
qwueri 
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Posted 6/6/17
Pulling out of a flawed council does nothing but leave the US without a voice on the matter. Not exactly the way to amend the flaws.
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☆Land of sweets☆
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Posted 6/6/17


The current U.N. regular budget calls for $5.4 billion over two years. By a formula based on the size of a country’s economy and other factors, America’s assessment is set at 22 percent, or about $1.2 billion.

Based on the last Obama administration budget, the United States provided $1.2 billion to the U.N. over two years, and Portman is correct.

But that’s just for the U.N.’s regular budget. There are over a dozen other U.N. agencies and operations that American dollars also support. The single largest is peacekeeping with a price tag of about $7.8 billion this year alone. The U.S. share of that cost is over 28 percent, or $2.2 billion.

The next three U.N. agencies -- all roughly in the $100 million per year range -- are the World Health Organization, the Food and Agriculture Organization and the International Atomic Energy Agency.

All told, the United States provides about $3.3 billion a year to finance U.N. activities.

http://www.politifact.com/global-news/statements/2017/feb/01/rob-portman/us-contribution-un-22-percent/
tl;dr US wastes a ton of tax payer money on UN. over $3 billion to be more precise.
qwueri 
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Posted 6/6/17

namealreadytaken wrote:

http://www.politifact.com/global-news/statements/2017/feb/01/rob-portman/us-contribution-un-22-percent/
tl;dr US wastes a ton of tax payer money on UN. over $3 billion to be more precise.


Diplomatic, humanitarian, and peacekeeping efforts are hardly a waste.
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☆Land of sweets☆
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Posted 6/6/17 , edited 6/6/17
US spend several billion dollars and several years of diplomacy with Saudi Arabia. i'm sure that definitely helped the human rights over there. wait.
as for peacekeeping...the entire world hates the US for a reason.

also, from what i read, Red Cross is an independent body from United nations, so things such as disaster relief and humanitarian aid will still be provided.
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Posted 6/6/17
well i do agree with the idea of the organizations when it comes to diplomacy and such i would say though it isn't working as it should though too incompetent and corrupt.
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Posted 6/6/17 , edited 6/6/17
Its okay, US really wants the world to screw up right now, and Trump is making our wish come true. Yay!

Too much complacency under Obama.
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Posted 6/6/17
Last time I checked, Japan attacked us for many reasons. One of the main ones is we told them to stop being aggressive, they wouldn't. So we cut off the Oil and Gas we were selling them. They attacked us in an attempt to gain a foothold on an island in the center of the pacific. They also attacked Alaska, though they backed down from that offensive with our attacking them in the Pacific.
qwueri 
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Posted 6/6/17

namealreadytaken wrote:

US spend several billion dollars and several years of diplomacy with Saudi Arabia. i'm sure that definitely helped the human rights over there. wait.
as for peacekeeping...the entire world hates the US for a reason.

also, from what i read, Red Cross is an independent body from United nations, so things such as disaster relief and humanitarian aid will still be provided.


So complain about the UN and cite US actions?
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48 / M / Memphis, TN
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Posted 6/6/17 , edited 6/6/17

MeanderCat wrote: Incidentally, thanks for your service and your reply. I was almost in the Navy, but went Army instead. I find it interesting that we're discussing this on the 73rd anniversary of D-Day.



And thank you for your service, also. While I disagree with your position on this particular matter, I deeply respect what you were willing to risk to preserve such freedom of debate, amongst others. Despite the failings inherent in any political system, we've managed to pass down an important legacy of intellectual freedom to at least one more generation. . .
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Posted 6/6/17

moonhawk81 wrote:


Incidentally, thanks for your service and your reply. I was almost in the Navy, but went Army instead. I find it interesting that we're discussing this on the 73rd anniversary of D-Day.



And thank you for your service, also. While I disagree with your position on this particular matter, I deeply respect what you were willing to risk to preserve such freedom of debate, amongst others. Despite the failings inherent in any political system, we've managed to pass down an important legacy of intellectual freedom to at least one more generation. . .


Intellectual freedom is alive and it is gaining more and more traction in response to these idiots trying to stop it. Thanks for your service!
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48 / M / Memphis, TN
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Posted 6/6/17 , edited 6/6/17

Rujikin wrote:


moonhawk81 wrote:


MeanderCat wrote: Incidentally, thanks for your service and your reply. I was almost in the Navy, but went Army instead. I find it interesting that we're discussing this on the 73rd anniversary of D-Day.



And thank you for your service, also. While I disagree with your position on this particular matter, I deeply respect what you were willing to risk to preserve such freedom of debate, amongst others. Despite the failings inherent in any political system, we've managed to pass down an important legacy of intellectual freedom to at least one more generation. . .


Intellectual freedom is alive and it is gaining more and more traction in response to these idiots trying to stop it. Thanks for your service!


I sincerely hope you prove correct! (And thank you.)
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