Post Reply Advice on learning other languages
21371 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
26 / M / Leanbox, Gameindu...
Offline
Posted 6/11/17
Hi, so I was wondering if the CR community could give me advice on ways to both maintain and further your knowledge in another language. Which strategies have worked best for you?
I studied Spanish on and off for a while and while I made decent progress attending classes, I find it hard to find "direction" with making progress outside of a traditional classroom setting.
Strategies you have used for any language that worked or did not work and your thoughts on why or why not would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks!
15615 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
36 / M / UK
Offline
Posted 6/11/17
One key word.

Immersion.


The best way to learn a language is to immerse yourself in it. Ideally by being in a place with lots of native speakers where you are forced to pick up the language to survive. Second to that a classroom environment with a teacher who will help you focus on what things to learn and classmates to practice your talking and listening skills.

If those aren't an option, find other ways to immerse yourself; watch movies/shows, listen to music, read books all in the language you are trying to learn. While these won't advance your conversational skills they will maintain your familiarity with the language, improve your listening comprehension and may help you to build your vocabulary.
2499 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
Offline
Posted 6/11/17
a co-worker of mine learn Portuguese within 6 months (also met and married his wife there too).

the quickest way to learn a new language is to live in the country where you have no choice but to communicate in that language for all your needs! it's a lot quicker than just spending 1-2 hours a day talking in the new language and then switching back to your native language the moment you got out of class.

humans are adaptable
39 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
24 / Lost in Cyberspace
Offline
Posted 6/11/17
The only method that comes into my mind which wasn't already mentioned, is for example to join some online communities.
Important is that the community is about your interest or some general topics you like to discuss about. It's an easy way to get in touch with some native speakers. For example: If you like anime or if you have a specific hobby, search for an active community in the language you want to practise.

From my own experience it helps a lot.
13006 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
☆Land of sweets☆
Offline
Posted 6/12/17
someone once said that you're supposed to learn the language and culture together. i agree.
learning just the language by itself is not enough. you need to learn the culture as well.
33182 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
50 / M / Side 6
Offline
Posted 6/12/17
Instead of platitudes, something actually useful: Anki
nxvb 
1229 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
19 / M / Somewhere to my l...
Offline
Posted 6/13/17
Go to the country that speaks the language. You're going to have to learn the language if you plan on getting by
Riled 
15 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
28 / F / Canada
Offline
Posted 6/15/17
Immersion is obviously the best way, but I'm trying to learn another language now, and I have work books, and phone apps, and a notebook. I'd love to get in an hour a day, but even if I can't, I at least make time for 15 minutes of app work, or going over my notes. I think repetition and making sure you don't lose your motivation and drive is a big important part of it too!
21371 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
26 / M / Leanbox, Gameindu...
Offline
Posted 6/15/17 , edited 6/15/17

SubUnitTwo wrote:

The only method that comes into my mind which wasn't already mentioned, is for example to join some online communities.
Important is that the community is about your interest or some general topics you like to discuss about. It's an easy way to get in touch with some native speakers. For example: If you like anime or if you have a specific hobby, search for an active community in the language you want to practise.

From my own experience it helps a lot.


Hmm, I've never considered this before. *Noted*


Riled wrote:

Immersion is obviously the best way, but I'm trying to learn another language now, and I have work books, and phone apps, and a notebook. I'd love to get in an hour a day, but even if I can't, I at least make time for 15 minutes of app work, or going over my notes. I think repetition and making sure you don't lose your motivation and drive is a big important part of it too!


Yeah, the motivation thing can get you if you don't have people to talk to. I feel like that's the benefit of classes and whatnot.
I've lived abroad in a country that spoke the language for a bit and it helped, but traveling right now is something that really isn't possible with ongoing other commitments.


sena3927 wrote:

Instead of platitudes, something actually useful: Anki


I will give it a look, this should help with vocabulary (memorization), however the lack of direction that comes with not having either a class, a tutor, a software or some sort of guidance and what to check out next seems to be my current weakness.


MidoriNoTora wrote:

One key word.

Immersion.


The best way to learn a language is to immerse yourself in it. Ideally by being in a place with lots of native speakers where you are forced to pick up the language to survive. Second to that a classroom environment with a teacher who will help you focus on what things to learn and classmates to practice your talking and listening skills.

If those aren't an option, find other ways to immerse yourself; watch movies/shows, listen to music, read books all in the language you are trying to learn. While these won't advance your conversational skills they will maintain your familiarity with the language, improve your listening comprehension and may help you to build your vocabulary.



First option obviously works, but currently not "in the cards, ditto on the 2nd. Any advice on classes outside of the university setting (either online or in person?). Too many language courses are mid day which completely sucks for someone who works first shift.
I've tried with media, and have had mixed success. Reading is probably what I can do the best, although at an extremely slow pace.
You must be logged in to post.