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Posted 6/13/17 , edited 6/13/17



anyone here have a lot of experience with oral board ?

I went through one before and it was ok. They gave you questions on note cards so you can follow along if you like. It didn't last long though.. I was in and out within 5-10 minutes. I passed.

any tips/advice for newbies going through an oral board interview ?
Posted 6/13/17 , edited 6/13/17

dulun18 wrote:
anyone here have a lot of experiences with oral boards ?

I went through one before and it was ok. They gave you questions on note cards so you can follow along if you like. It didn't last long though.. I was in and out within 5-10 minutes. I passed.

any tips/advice for newbies going through an oral board interview ?



If you do not have a pre-existing history with the board that you're going up against, make sure you dress to impress.

Make sure you know the position and department that you're applying for or are going to be discussing like the back of your hand.

If you're going as a promotion, make sure you have some keen examples that illustrate where you've helped the department or company in the eyes of the customer/client.

Listen carefully to the questions (not all will give you the answers on paper, most do not) - some of them will be designed towards thought process instead of a clear right/wrong answer.

Finally, don't ramble. Keep in mind that if this is an interview or examination, you have a time limit. If it's for a position, chances are they have several others lined up before and after you. Being discourteous by rambling and extending the time just to ensure that your answer is within the perimeters that you think they want to hear is going to be a negative, not a positive.

---

Oral reviews/examinations are part of my hiring process when I hire a new developer or technical support agent. I also have to deal with being in front of the Board of Directors once every two months where they challenge whether or not I'm doing my position to the best of my capacity (not quite the same but it is the same environment/Q&A type platform).
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Posted 6/13/17

ninjitsuko wrote:

If you do not have a pre-existing history with the board that you're going up against, make sure you dress to impress.

Make sure you know the position and department that you're applying for or are going to be discussing like the back of your hand.

If you're going as a promotion, make sure you have some keen examples that illustrate where you've helped the department or company in the eyes of the customer/client.

Listen carefully to the questions (not all will give you the answers on paper, most do not) - some of them will be designed towards thought process instead of a clear right/wrong answer.

Finally, don't ramble. Keep in mind that if this is an interview or examination, you have a time limit. If it's for a position, chances are they have several others lined up before and after you. Being discourteous by rambling and extending the time just to ensure that your answer is within the perimeters that you think they want to hear is going to be a negative, not a positive.
---
Oral reviews/examinations are part of my hiring process when I hire a new developer or technical support agent. I also have to deal with being in front of the Board of Directors once every two months where they challenge whether or not I'm doing my position to the best of my capacity (not quite the same but it is the same environment/Q&A type platform).


I think they have 20-30 positions to fill and about 100-ish remaining (after physical and written tests) It is pretty competitive.

There's a time limit then ? what's the usual time limit for answering after the question ?
Posted 6/13/17

dulun18 wrote:
I think they have 20-30 positions to fill and about 100-ish remaining (after physical and written tests) It is pretty competitive.

There's a time limit then ? what's the usual time limit for answering after the question ?


This varies depending on the company and the position. In most scenarios, the board should at least tell you how long you have for the overall interview. When I catch someone rambling, I try to politely steer them back to around 2-3 minutes per question at most. If they continue to do so, I strike it off as a negative response. If they don't supply a timeframe, just try to keep your answers between 2-5 minutes depending on how complex or specific the question is. Keep in mind that some questions may have follow-up questions based on your initial response.

At the end of the day, I'm sure you're aware as to how time management works when you're interviewing people (or being interviewed). Going off on a tangent on something totally unrelated to the question is going to waste time and annoy people.
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Posted 6/13/17

ninjitsuko wrote:

This varies depending on the company and the position. In most scenarios, the board should at least tell you how long you have for the overall interview. When I catch someone rambling, I try to politely steer them back to around 2-3 minutes per question at most. If they continue to do so, I strike it off as a negative response. If they don't supply a timeframe, just try to keep your answers between 2-5 minutes depending on how complex or specific the question is. Keep in mind that some questions may have follow-up questions based on your initial response.

At the end of the day, I'm sure you're aware as to how time management works when you're interviewing people (or being interviewed). Going off on a tangent on something totally unrelated to the question is going to waste time and annoy people.


Do you have an example of your worst and best applicants ?
Posted 6/13/17

dulun18 wrote:

Do you have an example of your worst and best applicants ?


Best:
Woman showed up in a blouse.
She knew the details of the department he'd be working in, had coding examples that were similar to what we were doing, knew the product as well as she could for not knowing any of our proprietary technologies.
She kept her answers concise, tightly timed (without having been given anything more than an overall interview time frame of 30 minutes), left room open for any follow-up questions.
She was quick to determine what questions required a genuine answer or one that simply allowed us to pry into her thought processes.

Worst:
Guy showed up looking (and smelling) like he hadn't showered in a month.
Kept forgetting what company, position, and the department he was applying for (despite the company name was on the wall right behind the five of us giving him questions).
Rambled on about unimportant things (when asked about his experience, he brought up a game he coded as a hobby - nothing even remotely professional or relating to our platform, or when he was asked about time management he spent 10 minutes giving examples of how he can shower [believe it or not] in less than 3 minutes if required).
Whether we asked professional or personal questions, he would always go back to something that happened 10+ years ago.

I did some digging into the worst - he had four homes, wife, and two kids. There wasn't any rhyme or reason as to why he couldn't have looked more presentable. He was in his late 20's - no reason to be so reflective on non-professional situations. The woman who I listed as an example of our "best" (or at least one of the best that I've interviewed in this manner) had been living with her sister since college and was in massive debt, dire straights, and really needed the job (this was only revealed after I sent her an offer).

It just boils down to presentability, respect for the time you're taking (disrespect shows that you don't value their time nor your own), and understanding as to what you're applying for.
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Posted 6/13/17 , edited 6/13/17


So the people who are in dire need of a job will be among the best applicants ?

Can you weed out the people who are there for the money vs compassion/dedication for the job they are applying for ?

I heard of companies who will not hire someone if they are not financially responsible (over head in debts).
Posted 6/13/17

dulun18 wrote:
So the people who are in dire need of a job will be among the best applicants ?

Can you weed out the people who are there for the money vs compassion/dedication for the job they are applying for ?

I heard of companies who will not hire someone if they are not financially responsible (over head in debts).


It's not really the need for the job that determines whether they're the better applicant. In my experience, someone who genuinely wants the position is easier to spot and stands out more. Someone who's just doing it because a friend suggested it, or they're thinking about trying a different company to get a feel for what's expected... things like that - they're easy to spot and it becomes an eyesore.

I actually weed out the people who are there for the money versus there for the field. We pay fairly well considering it's a small company and there are high expectations of anyone who works for us. In the past, HR focused more on degrees and qualifications, less on the passion and drive for the work they'd be doing. It screwed us pretty bad because they would bounce when things got too difficult to handle.

I don't really care about someone's debt standings. I only researched the guy who was the "worst" because I couldn't rationalize him coming into an interview of a $95k a year job looking as though he hadn't taken care of himself in months. A part of me was hoping he was unemployed and was struggling, just so I could justify his actions. The woman who we ended up hiring - we didn't know she was in dire need until after she came in on the first day of training. She thanked all of us who interviewed her profoundly. lol.
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Posted 6/13/17 , edited 6/13/17

ninjitsuko wrote:



It's not really the need for the job that determines whether they're the better applicant. In my experience, someone who genuinely wants the position is easier to spot and stands out more. Someone who's just doing it because a friend suggested it, or they're thinking about trying a different company to get a feel for what's expected... things like that - they're easy to spot and it becomes an eyesore.

I actually weed out the people who are there for the money versus there for the field. We pay fairly well considering it's a small company and there are high expectations of anyone who works for us. In the past, HR focused more on degrees and qualifications, less on the passion and drive for the work they'd be doing. It screwed us pretty bad because they would bounce when things got too difficult to handle.

I don't really care about someone's debt standings. I only researched the guy who was the "worst" because I couldn't rationalize him coming into an interview of a $95k a year job looking as though he hadn't taken care of himself in months. A part of me was hoping he was unemployed and was struggling, just so I could justify his actions. The woman who we ended up hiring - we didn't know she was in dire need until after she came in on the first day of training. She thanked all of us who interviewed her profoundly. lol.


I have a lot of questions about this topic and you were very helpful. I thank you for that.

Is it possible for me to ask them later ? I have to get ready for the interview.

It's probably a quick interview like the last time. This is the first oral board of the process, there's another one after the background investigation and polygraph
Posted 6/13/17

dulun18 wrote:
I have a lot of questions about this topic and you were very helpful. I thank you for that.

Is it possible for me to ask them later ? I have to get ready for the interview.

It's probably a quick interview like the last time. This is the first oral board of the process, there's another one after the background investigation and polygraph


You can always private message me if you want to make it easier. Good luck on the interview!

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Posted 6/13/17 , edited 6/14/17

ninjitsuko wrote:


You can always private message me if you want to make it easier. Good luck on the interview!



I think it's easier with the forums + the same information can be shared with others reading this thread

I just got back from the oral board. I passed. The interview lasted around 15-20 minutes for me.

The background interview/investigation is next and then the command board. I'll have to do the polygraph before getting the conditional offer.

I heard there are some other tests (after that medical, psychological, etc..)

I was told the hiring process can take 3-6 months!!

Posted 6/13/17 , edited 6/13/17

dulun18 wrote:
I think it's easier with the forums + the same information can be shared with others reading this post.

I just got back from the oral board. I passed. The interview lasted around 15-20 minutes for me.


Congrats on passing! Yeah, 15-30 minutes is pretty much the norm for these kinds of things. I'm sure they have a hard limit of 30 minutes but didn't have many follow-up questions and (hopefully) you kept your answers clear and concise.


dulun18 wrote:
The background interview/investigation is next and then the command board. I'll have to do the polygraph before getting the conditional offer.

I heard there are some other tests (after that medical, psychological, etc..)

I was told the hiring process can take 3-6 months!!


I'm tapping into my limited memory of what happens on the forums but correct me if I'm wrong... aren't you applying for a government type position? I think you mentioned it on the thread about an application asking whether or not you've been part of a protest or demonstration.

Government contract jobs and direct government positions have stages, endless stages. It's like a really bad video game where the skill you must level up before you get to the last 3-6 stages is "Patience". Last time I had a direct government department job, it took nearly a bloody year. I had to get security clearance to meet the level of clearance required (which meant background investigation for the last 10 years, character references, professional references, and on and on..), go through the endless tests and confirmations through board interviews, polygraphs, physical and mental evaluation (just to make sure they're not hiring someone that'll snap in two seconds)...

It'll feel endless but just keep your head up. From your posts, it sounds like you're not having troubles making ends meet - so just ride the wave until you get an offer.
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Posted 6/14/17 , edited 6/14/17


Yes. I created this thread
http://www.crunchyroll.com/forumtopic-992351/is-this-more-common-on-applications-now-a-day-

I applied with 4 cities for the same job. The one above has a portion on the application that I didn't see in the others before. I didn't know they would ask that on the application.

The oral board of this city is tougher than the other city, there were 4 people instead of 3. There's one who rarely write anything down.. I think he probably failed me "due to lack of experience" ? but i passed so i guess i got at least 3 out of 4...

The command board will be with people from the field that i'm applying into, i'm guessing they have higher ranks than the people who interviewed me in the oral board ?
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Posted 6/14/17

dulun18 wrote:

The oral board of this city is tougher than the other city, there were 4 people instead of 3. There's one who rarely write anything down.. I think he probably failed me "due to lack of experience" ? but i passed so i guess i got at least 3 out of 4...

The command board will be with people from the field that i'm applying into, i'm guessing they have higher ranks than the people who interviewed me in the oral board ?


I think most oral boards will have 3-5 people. They should tell you upfront that writing or not writing while you are talking doesn't mean anything at the beginning of the oral board.

command board ? if this is a government job as you stated it's not a civil position... is it a sworn position ?

I don't think you have to go through the command board for civil positions...
Posted 6/15/17 , edited 6/15/17

dulun18 wrote:
The oral board of this city is tougher than the other city, there were 4 people instead of 3. There's one who rarely write anything down.. I think he probably failed me "due to lack of experience" ? but i passed so i guess i got at least 3 out of 4...


I should have warned you that writing things down doesn't really reflect much on the person that's on the board you're interviewing with (as per AnimeAddictANN69 had mentioned). Some people are confident with their instincts over any data that they put down on a piece of paper (I never write things down since I have an awesome as hell memory).


dulun18 wrote:
The command board will be with people from the field that i'm applying into, i'm guessing they have higher ranks than the people who interviewed me in the oral board ?


This sounds like a police or security-based detail. In those situations, I would highly recommend doing some research on those who would be on the command board and make sure you are absolutely confident in the department you're hoping to work for (their achievements, their accomplishments [that specific department/division/agency], and so on). At that level, you're going to be dealing with people who are either high on the totem pole due to experience or because of knowledge in the field.

There are other things you should probably avoid doing during and after the interview. One of the things that I was told got me a job at a government think tank when I was so young (mid 20's at the time) was because I had asked if there were any questions that the command board wished to re-address or get additional clarity on since we had time remaining. I got a lot of handshakes and thank you memos once I got the job offer because of that strategy.

At the end of the day, just keep yourself updated on the department you're applying for, people in said department, and any public information regarding the department/agency must be in your head. Knowledge is power and going in knowing what you're dealing with in terms of persons, company, and the department will make it easier for you to handle if they throw you any curveballs.
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