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Post Reply Using Public Wi-Fi
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Posted 7/6/17
How often do you use public wi-fi ?

Hackers targeting WiFi in public spaces
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AX9017DgQ-Y




You local library will have free Wi-fi available 24/7 with no password required. You just need to be close enough to use it. The speed is pretty fast-- especially during the closing hours. I would not log in to personal accounts when using it though, i would just surf the web when using public wi-fi.
Posted 7/6/17

dulun18 wrote:
How often do you use public wi-fi ?


Never. Never, ever, ever.
I grew up in the age of computer nerdiness/hacking/cracking where wardriving started. It's still a thing. When I was going to college, I was the guy who had access to pretty much any wifi you could find in a 30-mile radius of my place (free/open or closed). In the modern day, you have so many public WiFi locations (grocery stores, coffee shops, and so on) that it's just begging for trouble.

I've convinced my girlfriend to stop using public WiFi hotspots when I gave her a crash course (I made a dummy network as an access point, then showed her how much data/information her phone was giving me). Indirectly, I got the IT specialist at her school (where she works) terminated because of my packet sniffing - I was able to grab student names, addresses, class/teacher, and parents' name/address just from a few teachers updating records.

Long story short: don't use public wifi. Unless you're having a hallucination in middle of the desert and you think that the water hole you found is somehow broadcasting a public wifi that'll save your life... just leave it alone. Your device broadcasts more data than you think, logging into private accounts or not.
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Posted 7/6/17
It's literally safer to just randomly hand your phone to someone on the street.

>.>


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Posted 7/6/17

ninjitsuko wrote:


dulun18 wrote:
How often do you use public wi-fi ?


Never. Never, ever, ever.
I grew up in the age of computer nerdiness/hacking/cracking where wardriving started. It's still a thing. When I was going to college, I was the guy who had access to pretty much any wifi you could find in a 30-mile radius of my place (free/open or closed). In the modern day, you have so many public WiFi locations (grocery stores, coffee shops, and so on) that it's just begging for trouble.

I've convinced my girlfriend to stop using public WiFi hotspots when I gave her a crash course (I made a dummy network as an access point, then showed her how much data/information her phone was giving me). Indirectly, I got the IT specialist at her school (where she works) terminated because of my packet sniffing - I was able to grab student names, addresses, class/teacher, and parents' name/address just from a few teachers updating records.

Long story short: don't use public wifi. Unless you're having a hallucination in middle of the desert and you think that the water hole you found is somehow broadcasting a public wifi that'll save your life... just leave it alone. Your device broadcasts more data than you think, logging into private accounts or not.


Did that school paid you? That there desire a major paycheck.
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Posted 7/6/17
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Posted 7/6/17
In the early years of the Nintendo DS, 2006/2007 I think, I'd be happy to find any signal I could get.

But naw, not since those dry days of wireless internet have I been that desperate. lol
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Posted 7/6/17

ninjitsuko wrote:


dulun18 wrote:
How often do you use public wi-fi ?


Never. Never, ever, ever.
I grew up in the age of computer nerdiness/hacking/cracking where wardriving started. It's still a thing. When I was going to college, I was the guy who had access to pretty much any wifi you could find in a 30-mile radius of my place (free/open or closed). In the modern day, you have so many public WiFi locations (grocery stores, coffee shops, and so on) that it's just begging for trouble.

I've convinced my girlfriend to stop using public WiFi hotspots when I gave her a crash course (I made a dummy network as an access point, then showed her how much data/information her phone was giving me). Indirectly, I got the IT specialist at her school (where she works) terminated because of my packet sniffing - I was able to grab student names, addresses, class/teacher, and parents' name/address just from a few teachers updating records.

Long story short: don't use public wifi. Unless you're having a hallucination in middle of the desert and you think that the water hole you found is somehow broadcasting a public wifi that'll save your life... just leave it alone. Your device broadcasts more data than you think, logging into private accounts or not.


Wouldn't this not work on anything HTTPS? I mean, I realize Crunchyroll doesn't seem to be doing this, but I thought at one point even Chrome was going to display warning pages on anything that didn't support HTTPS.
Posted 7/6/17 , edited 7/6/17
Not without a VPN.
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Posted 7/6/17
I've used the local library's one once years ago. You needed to register and set your own password. Oh and once when I was on holiday, I used my hotel's wi-fi via my phone.
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Posted 7/6/17

prh99 wrote:

Not without a VPN.


That doesn't seem accurate in the example I'm giving.
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19 / F / MANKAIカンパニー
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Posted 7/6/17
I don't really use public wifi. My 4G is usually enough.
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Posted 7/6/17 , edited 7/6/17


be sure to talk with her about FREE APPs too


Free apps that pay you money
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NvKRd7NhR2k

Privacy and smartphone apps: What data your phone may be giving away (CBC Marketplace)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xx1AUupLn2w


you are a fan of home automation and a gamer right ? The internet of things

I do not want the world of Megaman

Game Theory: Hackers Are EVERYWHERE! (Watch Dogs 2)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RCnwfaN6dOQ

the rubber ducky ? the pineapple



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Posted 7/6/17
My university uses eduroam for the students. Everyone has an accounted created for them before hand.
Posted 7/6/17

paul25454 wrote:
Did that school paid you? That there desire a major paycheck.


Nope. Public funding doesn't work like that. The position was removed altogether and they had hired a contractor to come out and secure the school's network.


MossRantz wrote:
Wouldn't this not work on anything HTTPS? I mean, I realize Crunchyroll doesn't seem to be doing this, but I thought at one point even Chrome was going to display warning pages on anything that didn't support HTTPS.


You're right when it comes down to general browsing habits. However, what do most people use when it comes to public wifi networks? Mobile phones or tablets that utilize apps. There is seldom ever any sort of notification whether or not the connection is secured through HTTPS or not. In regard to my own example - HTTPS wasn't enabled by default because the netadmin/IT professional at the school was an idiot. All the data I sniffed out was in plain text.

As it stands, I believe Chrome only gives you a notification of whether an HTTPS connection is secure through SSL or not if you're on a page requesting login information and/or credit card information (even if you go to Crunchyroll and try to buy something from their store - it'll be in HTTPS if you go to input your payment method).

The issue comes from what device you're utilizing to access these wifi connections. I could go into a grocery store (as most of them offer free wifi since their insulation blocks mobile signals or weakens it to the point of near-death) and set up a dummy wifi that most people walking in would auto-connect to. This is where the techo-unsavvy will fall into a trap because they've become so accustomed to using free wifi and utilizing apps that aren't secure.


dulun18 wrote:
be sure to talk with her about FREE APPs too


Trust me, she went from being the average tech savvy person to being near-paranoid tech savvy like I am.


dulun18 wrote:
you are a fan of home automation and a gamer right ? The internet of things
I do not want the world of Megaman


Rofl. Yeah, ironically, Watch Dogs 2 is one of my favorite Ubisoft games in recent days. This is the reason why all of my IoT stuff is on an isolated network and connection.


dulun18 wrote:
the rubber ducky ? the pineapple


The funny thing is that these phrases are kind of commonly used nowadays. Back in the day, rubber duckies were used on enemies, family members, or schools. Pineapples were used in places that had crappy wifi systems for payment systems (a former friend of mine in high school was arrested for fetching hundreds of thousands of credit card numbers by having a pineapple access point and Raspberry Pi set up at a Lowe's (the hardware store) ..).

These things are still a thing. It's just that because the world has become more and more technologically focused - these things can happen more often than you'd think. Public wifi is a convenience, but an evil one at that.
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Posted 7/6/17 , edited 7/6/17
When I use public wifi, I go nuts. If I'm on my computer, I have two VPNs running at the same time. (Pointless, yes I know. But I am crazy like that.)

Maybe I wouldn't turn on a VPN if it had bad signal, but then I would only use things such as YouTube or just casual googling on a browser i've never used before. Trusting public wifi is a big risk, one that you should never take. Maybe a few DNS leak tests and what's my ip searches every so and then to make sure its going fine.
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