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Post Reply Worst Character In Anime You Ever Seen Someone Deemed Their "Waifu" Or "Husbando"?
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Posted 4/17/18 , edited 15 days ago
Asuka from Neon Genesis Evangelion. I hate her with a passion. I don't even hate villains who've hurt my favorite characters as much as I despise that walking pile of garbage. She is rude to everyone except Kaji and is so sexist. Ugh
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Posted 4/17/18 , edited 4/17/18

auroraloose wrote:


PeripheralVisionary wrote:


Or rather, you compared it to Baudrillard's ideals towards why one had twin towers in the first place, and it sort of loosely remind you of this dichotomous nature of two towers or zero, but not the underlying concepts, huh?



More this one, yes. I've already more than derailed the thread, though, so if I'm going to talk about Baudrillard, I'll both keep it relevant and do it Baudrillard's way - by making up quotes:

Imouto: Do not try and choose a waifu; that's impossible. Instead, only try to realize the truth.
Oneii-chan: What truth?
Imouto: There is no waifu.
Oneii-chan: There is no waifu.
Imouto: Then you'll see that it is not the waifu that's chosen, it is only yourself.

The less crazy part of what Baudrillard was trying to get at by appealing to binary was that one of the ways that news/entertainment/media functions as spectacle is to prime the audience to respond in certain ways: He compares it to how questions have within themselves both the seeds of their own answers and suggestions as to how would go about answering in the first place. It's like creating a character in an anime to be the waifu: we're going to treat her like a waifu because she's like the kind of character we treat like a waifu. There's no such thing as a waifu without an audience. This is exactly why you can have waifus that are absolute trash: the waifu is a transaction between the anime and the audience, and any character can be the basis for such a transaction.

In the same way, corporations don't just appeal to society; they recreate society into consumers who inherently find their products appealing. There's no in-between state of contemplation - the consumer and consumed exist as mirrors of each other, and that's the binary. To bring Rorty back in, the leftover parts of ourselves are forgotten; the real is replaced with Baudrillard's hyperreal. The difference is that Rorty is fine with the blue pill, and Baudrillard is very much not.

Anyway, Baudrillard said the two World Trade Center towers represent this. He also relates the fact that they're identical to his notion of the simulacrum - the copy without an original - but the rest of what he says went over my head.

I do feel like there's enough in there to be relevant to the idea that Popuko and Pipimi aren't separable, but it's more that their insanity fits right into the world Baudrillard described.


PeripheralVisionary wrote:

I may be able to comprehending his texts later, as long as it is not as difficult as Finnegan Wake or as brimmed to the top with references as if Ready Player One and T.S. Eliot's The Waste land had an unholy coupling resulting in a ghastly myriad of references in terms of concepts.

Yes, I was trying to exaggerate here. The film's sheer number of references does remind me of The Waste land.


I recently read Baudrillard's Simulations, but I can't say I understood what he was saying. I'm pretty sure I understood why the provocative parts made sense and were provocative, but I don't know enough about 20th-century Marxist theory to be able to understand the background he's writing from. Baudrillard's own writing style was unique, but it's definitely a subset of the hyperbolic, masturbatory rebellion chic postmodern intellectuals supposedly traffic in and are known for. So I wouldn't read Baudrillard to try to understand what he's saying; it's more that, if you forget about trying to understand him, he's fun to read, and the provocative parts are accessible enough. As a manufacturer of BS he's brilliant - and easy to simulate, as I did above on waifus. His essay "Simulacra and Simulations," which you can find online, is short and representative; here's a good quote (and a real one):


Disneyland is there to conceal the fact that it is the "real" country, all of "real" America, which is Disneyland (just as prisons are there to conceal the fact that it is the social in its entirety, in its banal omnipresence, which is carceral). Disneyland is presented as imaginary in order to make us believe that the rest is real, when in fact all of Los Angeles and the America surrounding it are no longer real, but of the order of the hyperreal and of simulation. It is no longer a question of a false representation of reality (ideology), but of concealing the fact that the real is no longer real, and thus of saving the reality principle.


The exchange in The Matrix I massacred above may well have come from this passage. Here's another good (and authentic) Baudrillard quote to give you an idea of him:


The Matrix is surely the kind of film about the matrix that the matrix would have been able to produce.


It's probably more that one experiences Baudrillard than that one understands him, or that he makes any sense in the first place.

I actually haven't read any Eliot. I was thinking of seeing Ready Player One, though; is it good? It feels to me like Scott Pilgrim vs. the World (which I also haven't seen) already did that kind of thing, and was probably a lot funnier.


A-It comes off that the sum of the parts make the whole object, yet the object is defined by and defining its own constituent parts. It wouldn't be Popuko if it were not Popuko and Pipimi, nor would it be Pipimi if there were not a Popuko and Pipimi. The dichotomy is that they cannot exist their own, lest they stop being Popuko and Pipimi.

The individual concepts simply don't exist anywhere outside the whole; to attempt to do so would render us neither a Popuko or a Pipimi, otherwise the identity of either is loss, as they dependent on each other in unison.

Or essentially, reminiscent of the boke (Either an idiot making misconceptions or setting up his partner in order to make) tsukkomi (Straight man whose derision of the boke's idiocy completes the act, or whose derision propels the boke to a humorous clarifcation) act, or Manzai.

You can't have a boke with a tsukkomi; you'll just have a stupid or silly person. Nor can you have a tsukkomi without a boke, or else you just have a smart ass or an overly serious jerk.

Or to reiterate to clarify my current understanding, the individual identities do not exist, as they rely wholly on the holistic identity in of itself.

B-As for the film itself, I enjoyed it to an extent, but it isn't the best thing I have seen in the box office recently. Oh, so what you are saying is...Baudrillard shills a bit too much, and that confusion is oft times a tool meant to fool others into thinking one is a genius? It seems he covered the basic ideas of consumerism and reality?

I don't understand, but I will try again later on this...Post-structualism and Postermodernism concepts. If I feel sufficiently interested, anyway. My forays into philosophy have only so much have been studying on concepts that affect me on a personal level. Humanism, particularly in notions of where to derive self esteem from, what makes a complete and content being, and social ethics for relationships (Platonic or otherwise), among others.

T.S. Eliot is a particularly well known 20th century poet whose magnum opus, The Waste Land has a staggering number of references. Given its length and the obscurity requiring the most well read of scholars to use a guide, it is no surprise at how many are lost.

Ready Player One for having a significant amount of reference to pop culture. In terms of anime, something like Pani Poni Dash can be comparable in the sheer amount of references to the film. But more or less, I just wanted to make use of that hyperbole while it was still relevant.
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Posted 4/18/18 , edited 4/18/18

PeripheralVisionary wrote:
I don't understand, but I will try again later on this...Post-structualism and Postermodernism concepts. If I feel sufficiently interested, anyway. My forays into philosophy have only so much have been studying on concepts that affect me on a personal level. Humanism, particularly in notions of where to derive self esteem from, what makes a complete and content being, and social ethics for relationships (Platonic or otherwise), among others.


It's not easy to understand. And remember that I'm an amateur myself, even though I have read a lot, so I have trouble understanding, too. I find postmodernism important because it helps point out how common things we believe are straightforward are actually manipulative and contradictory, and that's incredibly important in our social media age. We're all incoherent and compromised. Baudrillard is fun to read, but it was reading Foucault my freshman year of undergrad that really changed how I view things. His The History of Sexuality is one of my favorite books. It's not an easy read, but it's rather more serious than Baudrillard's nonsense about binary, "implosion of poles," and "the genuine magnetic field."


PeripheralVisionary wrote:
T.S. Eliot is a particularly well known 20th century poet whose magnum opus, The Waste Land has a staggering number of references. Given its length and the obscurity requiring the most well read of scholars to use a guide, it is no surprise at how many are lost.


Well, as a pretentious elitist asshole, I'll have to put that on my reading list.
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Posted 4/18/18 , edited 4/19/18
Well, this thread certainly went to a weird and cultured place.
Ive never been a waifu or husbando guy (I havent ever owned a sexy figure or merch, ever); but I admit that I dis find Esdeath from Akame Ga Kill extremely attractive, despite the fact that she was a bloodthirsty psycho with zero redeeming qualities and barely any humanity whatsoever.
Also, Shauna from Saint Seiya....wven before she turned good I liked her.
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Posted 4/29/18 , edited 4/29/18

auroraloose wrote:


PeripheralVisionary wrote:
I don't understand, but I will try again later on this...Post-structualism and Postermodernism concepts. If I feel sufficiently interested, anyway. My forays into philosophy have only so much have been studying on concepts that affect me on a personal level. Humanism, particularly in notions of where to derive self esteem from, what makes a complete and content being, and social ethics for relationships (Platonic or otherwise), among others.


It's not easy to understand. And remember that I'm an amateur myself, even though I have read a lot, so I have trouble understanding, too. I find postmodernism important because it helps point out how common things we believe are straightforward are actually manipulative and contradictory, and that's incredibly important in our social media age. We're all incoherent and compromised. Baudrillard is fun to read, but it was reading Foucault my freshman year of undergrad that really changed how I view things. His The History of Sexuality is one of my favorite books. It's not an easy read, but it's rather more serious than Baudrillard's nonsense about binary, "implosion of poles," and "the genuine magnetic field."


PeripheralVisionary wrote:
T.S. Eliot is a particularly well known 20th century poet whose magnum opus, The Waste Land has a staggering number of references. Given its length and the obscurity requiring the most well read of scholars to use a guide, it is no surprise at how many are lost.


Well, as a pretentious elitist asshole, I'll have to put that on my reading list.


I find it to be a bit tepid, quite honestly. Finnegan Wake is understandable because it was suppose to simulate a dream into words, as I understand it (Or don't.)

I also have to read up on Michael Foucault. If I haven't already stated, I normally stick to basic philosophy because it usually is the most pertinent to my goals and interests, particularly self empowerment, mental wellness, where pride should be derived from, etc, alongside the practicing of social bonds and close relationships.

I am happy to branch out. I think ideas can be related in ways few others have thought of. My recent diatribes against how society in general believes how things should be (Bonds or sources of pride, and such.) piqued my interest, since they are related.

To which I shall make another post.

I don't really get the Toga love.
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Posted 5/1/18 , edited 5/1/18
Anyone who likes shin asuka as a husband needs to get a reality check
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Posted 5/1/18 , edited 5/1/18
Definitely Nico Yazawa. I can't understand why anyone would like her...
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Posted 5/2/18 , edited 15 days ago
When you are checking out the first page, skip to the last page, and the conversation goes from terrible waifus and husbandos to deep cultural discussions. I am so confused. What happened?
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Posted 5/2/18 , edited 5/3/18

SupahHamster wrote:

When you are checking out the first page, skip to the last page, and the conversation goes from terrible waifus and husbandos to deep cultural discussions. I am so confused. What happened?


Drugs.

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Posted 5/3/18 , edited 5/3/18

MeltingSky wrote:


SupahHamster wrote:

When you are checking out the first page, skip to the last page, and the conversation goes from terrible waifus and husbandos to deep cultural discussions. I am so confused. What happened?


Drugs.



If love is a drug, then I do not want to go to rehab.

Aurora-imouto-senpai....
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Posted 7/19/18 , edited 7/19/18

notyurinotinterested wrote:

Definitely Nico Yazawa. I can't understand why anyone would like her...


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