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24 / M / jacksonville
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Posted 8/3/17
Sup guys currently waiting for season 2 can't wait lol.Thinking about buying the light novel's.(Getting that anime withdrawal know what I mean haha).
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Posted 8/3/17
It was pretty bare bones, but it does need to continue.
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23 / M / United Kingdom
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Posted 8/3/17
It was Fun sure we need a season 2 that would absolutely be cool.
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38 / M / Maniwa Japan
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Posted 8/3/17
More Shalltear is always good.
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M / England
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Posted 8/3/17
I think season two would only be amazing if it followed the premise of the first show an only followed canon material (the light novels)
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Posted 8/3/17
Though Momonga was amazing in combat at any time.
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21 / M / Oppai Hell
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Posted 8/3/17 , edited 8/3/17
Honestly, my real problem thus far is how fucking boring Momonga is as a protagonist, especially since he appears to double as an in world antagonistic force. The philosophical lines he delivered after killing Clementine did not give me any insight to his character, but was just meaningless drivel, no different than when Akame Ga Kill tried to have depth by having Leone admit that they were "murderers", but that the ethics of killing were not gone into.

Seemingly so, a great deal of this is owed to how monotone his lines are delivered, alongside not being amazed at the writing for his character.
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Posted 8/3/17
I agree that he is boring but in the same way he isn't. There is flashbacks showing how he has a story with the creators of the game who created all the characters (like Shalltear...).

With Akame Ga Kill it was more the music made by Taku Iwasaki that give that scene depth.
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Posted 8/3/17 , edited 8/3/17

EthanSmart wrote:

I agree that he is boring but in the same way he isn't. There is flashbacks showing how he has a story with the creators of the game who created all the characters (like Shalltear...).

With Akame Ga Kill it was more the music made by Taku Iwasaki that give that scene depth.


I do not see how the background music of a scene can give a scene "depth" in anyway. Music seems to give nothing more than the context of what the creator intended and as a compliment to the scene, and impromptu shorthand to let the audience know what the scene is, how to feel about it, or any other frame of mind.

If done well, it can enhance a scene I suppose, but at times, it is more insidious in its attempt to sway the viewers into one direction or the other when the dialogue do not do enough. To induce us to tears without any sadness, to produce a fearful reaction in anticipation of something without anything to jump out once we rounded the corner. Music is powerful, which is why it can be a tool to persuade someone to a certain state of mind without effort in the writing.

Honestly, I could do the same scene in various works to different soundtracks, I could try to introduce one scene as I see it versus the other, or anything else for that matter. This can be applied to horrific scenes, scenes that do not get mention, scenes that need to give the appearance of depth without a real discussion. Quite frankly, the other problems lies in when how the creator views it differs from how the audience does. I could say "Hey, was not the rape of Bol's family such a romantic/awesome/erotic moment? Let us play a soundtrack indicating so!" Except the music doesn't change the instory context, it is just as horrible as anything else in Akame Ga Kill, plot wise and how poorly written it is.


To sum it all up:

-Poor writing cannot be masked by music, and music cannot be used to carry a scene. Music is the cherry on top, but far too often it has been used as a farcical way to have the audience go from one end of the emotional spectrum to another without effort, or actually letting them make up how they feel about the scene without interference.

-It can be a great tool, but as it gives audience's insight to the creators' minds, it can also be used to deduce several things regarding how they view events, horrendous or otherwise.

In short? Sarah Mclachlan's songs are well known for how effective they are in inducing sadness and guilt. Google search ASPCA Commercial Sarah Mclachlan Song.

To talk about Akame Ga Kill, there was no follow up. Everyone on Night Raid was overall, a decent person in contrast to Seryu, Esdeath, Doctor Stylish, and all of Wildhunt. It seemed more about communicating to Tatsumi that retribution from the Empire is to be expected, but it was worded as if they were of immoral standing, that killing and assassination was immoral.

It is hamfisted and lacks follow, as much as a scene later where Tatsumi kills some random politician and runs past his sun, regretting it, but it is never brought up again.

(To be fair, Wave, Bols, and possibly Kurome have their reasons.)
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Posted 8/3/17

PeripheralVisionary wrote:


EthanSmart wrote:

I agree that he is boring but in the same way he isn't. There is flashbacks showing how he has a story with the creators of the game who created all the characters (like Shalltear...).

With Akame Ga Kill it was more the music made by Taku Iwasaki that give that scene depth.


I do not see how the background music of a scene can give a scene "depth" in anyway. Music seems to give nothing more than the context of what the creator intended and as a compliment to the scene, and impromptu shorthand to let the audience know what the scene is, how to feel about it, or any other frame of mind.

If done well, it can enhance a scene I suppose, but at times, it is more insidious in its attempt to sway the viewers into one direction or the other when the dialogue do not do enough. To induce us to tears without any sadness, to produce a fearful reaction in anticipation of something without anything to jump out once we rounded the corner. Music is powerful, which is why it can be a tool to persuade someone to a certain state of mind without effort in the writing.

Honestly, I could do the same scene in various works to different soundtracks, I could try to introduce one scene as I see it versus the other, or anything else for that matter. This can be applied to horrific scenes, scenes that do not get mention, scenes that need to give the appearance of depth without a real discussion. Quite frankly, the other problems lies in when how the creator views it differs from how the audience does. I could say "Hey, was not the rape of Bol's family such a romantic/awesome/erotic moment? Let us play a soundtrack indicating so!" Except the music doesn't change the instory context, it is just as horrible as anything else in Akame Ga Kill, plot wise and how poorly written it is.


To sum it all up:

-Poor writing cannot be masked by music, and music cannot be used to carry a scene. Music is the cherry on top, but far too often it has been used as a farcical way to have the audience go from one end of the emotional spectrum to another without effort, or actually letting them make up how they feel about the scene without interference.

-It can be a great tool, but as it gives audience's insight to the creators' minds, it can also be used to deduce several things regarding how they view events, horrendous or otherwise.

In short? Sarah Mclachlan's songs are well known for how effective they are in inducing sadness and guilt. Google search ASPCA Commercial Sarah Mclachlan Song.



I have to agree and disagree.
Music cannot pull an idea or story entirely. However the contextualisation of small pieces of dialogue that build up over time, is frankly given power by the music in the background.

It can be down to one's personal opinion whether a script has been amazingly or horrifyingly written and this comes down to someones personal opinion, whether they have seen the source material (Novel, Light Novel, Manga or other film or show) and finally whether they can understand the directors vision.

Now with saying that you could put various soundtracks to a single scene, the issue there is that for a show a development has been made so that the soundtrack being made will have a song that will fit to a specific scene or there will be a song that will be used to conduct the emotions of its listeners when a certain emotion wants to be felt more than others.

People can purely have their own distinct opinions on varying matters and I'm not going to tell you yours or mine is the answer that sums up everything into a gratifying round of applause. However it can be said that music can massively effect a TV show or film (movie), In ways like the use of Leitmotifs, A grand stave orchestral or a common theme that slowly builds each time to a new piece in the soundtrack that inherently gives a scene colour (not literally but you get the idea).

Imagine Avatar without its music. Or Harry Potter without its use of creative Leitmotifs. Then it wouldn't be whole would it.
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21 / M / Oppai Hell
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Posted 8/3/17

EthanSmart wrote:


PeripheralVisionary wrote:


EthanSmart wrote:

I agree that he is boring but in the same way he isn't. There is flashbacks showing how he has a story with the creators of the game who created all the characters (like Shalltear...).

With Akame Ga Kill it was more the music made by Taku Iwasaki that give that scene depth.


I do not see how the background music of a scene can give a scene "depth" in anyway. Music seems to give nothing more than the context of what the creator intended and as a compliment to the scene, and impromptu shorthand to let the audience know what the scene is, how to feel about it, or any other frame of mind.

If done well, it can enhance a scene I suppose, but at times, it is more insidious in its attempt to sway the viewers into one direction or the other when the dialogue do not do enough. To induce us to tears without any sadness, to produce a fearful reaction in anticipation of something without anything to jump out once we rounded the corner. Music is powerful, which is why it can be a tool to persuade someone to a certain state of mind without effort in the writing.

Honestly, I could do the same scene in various works to different soundtracks, I could try to introduce one scene as I see it versus the other, or anything else for that matter. This can be applied to horrific scenes, scenes that do not get mention, scenes that need to give the appearance of depth without a real discussion. Quite frankly, the other problems lies in when how the creator views it differs from how the audience does. I could say "Hey, was not the rape of Bol's family such a romantic/awesome/erotic moment? Let us play a soundtrack indicating so!" Except the music doesn't change the instory context, it is just as horrible as anything else in Akame Ga Kill, plot wise and how poorly written it is.


To sum it all up:

-Poor writing cannot be masked by music, and music cannot be used to carry a scene. Music is the cherry on top, but far too often it has been used as a farcical way to have the audience go from one end of the emotional spectrum to another without effort, or actually letting them make up how they feel about the scene without interference.

-It can be a great tool, but as it gives audience's insight to the creators' minds, it can also be used to deduce several things regarding how they view events, horrendous or otherwise.

In short? Sarah Mclachlan's songs are well known for how effective they are in inducing sadness and guilt. Google search ASPCA Commercial Sarah Mclachlan Song.



I have to agree and disagree.
Music cannot pull an idea or story entirely. However the contextualisation of small pieces of dialogue that build up over time, is frankly given power by the music in the background.

It can be down to one's personal opinion whether a script has been amazingly or horrifyingly written and this comes down to someones personal opinion, whether they have seen the source material (Novel, Light Novel, Manga or other film or show) and finally whether they can understand the directors vision.

Now with saying that you could put various soundtracks to a single scene, the issue there is that for a show a development has been made so that the soundtrack being made will have a song that will fit to a specific scene or there will be a song that will be used to conduct the emotions of its listeners when a certain emotion wants to be felt more than others.

People can purely have their own distinct opinions on varying matters and I'm not going to tell you yours or mine is the answer that sums up everything into a gratifying round of applause. However it can be said that music can massively effect a TV show or film (movie), In ways like the use of Leitmotifs, A grand stave orchestral or a common theme that slowly builds each time to a new piece in the soundtrack that inherently gives a scene colour (not literally but you get the idea).

Imagine Avatar without its music. Or Harry Potter without its use of creative Leitmotifs. Then it wouldn't be whole would it.


That is exactly what I am saying, though I admit, I am far too cynical with the number of instances it is used incorrectly. I am saying that music cannot carry a scene, and I am saying that musics work to provide context of what is intended by the author, but you are also correct that it may be a way to communicate what everyone is feeling in the scene when visual cues are not that visible.

I am not concluding that music is an inherently insidious tool, but that it can be, and often is for subpar works. It boils down to a reason similar to why some anime girls are drawn in a kawaiiesque manner; to invoke sympathy on our inherent attraction to cute persons and things, such as kittens, puppies, children, etc.

I love music. Tracks like Duel of the Fates are incredible, the symphony for The Legend of Zelda made works like Breath of the Wild simply breath taking. It can enhance a scene beyond what we normally feel to the point of total immersion, whereas other works are more forceful, one way or another, which is what I criticize and dislike.
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Posted 8/3/17
I would like see them go into something they only touched upon in the first season, the subject of Momonga being changed by some sort of "limiter" or "not-really-explained-force" that helped to prevent him from panicking at the onset but them seemed to "steer" him if ever so subtly. That's something I'd like to see explored further as I have a tonne of questions as to what is behind it.
DeffyF 
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20 / M / UK
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Posted 8/3/17
Overlord is one of my favourites (haven't touched the manga though).

I really want to see Pandora's Actor in action, and I have high hopes since he is the creation of Momonga.

I was also really put off by Shalltear when she went "beauty queen" mode:


I have come to terms with it though
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M / England
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Posted 8/4/17

PeripheralVisionary wrote:


EthanSmart wrote:


PeripheralVisionary wrote:


EthanSmart wrote:

I agree that he is boring but in the same way he isn't. There is flashbacks showing how he has a story with the creators of the game who created all the characters (like Shalltear...).

With Akame Ga Kill it was more the music made by Taku Iwasaki that give that scene depth.


I do not see how the background music of a scene can give a scene "depth" in anyway. Music seems to give nothing more than the context of what the creator intended and as a compliment to the scene, and impromptu shorthand to let the audience know what the scene is, how to feel about it, or any other frame of mind.

If done well, it can enhance a scene I suppose, but at times, it is more insidious in its attempt to sway the viewers into one direction or the other when the dialogue do not do enough. To induce us to tears without any sadness, to produce a fearful reaction in anticipation of something without anything to jump out once we rounded the corner. Music is powerful, which is why it can be a tool to persuade someone to a certain state of mind without effort in the writing.

Honestly, I could do the same scene in various works to different soundtracks, I could try to introduce one scene as I see it versus the other, or anything else for that matter. This can be applied to horrific scenes, scenes that do not get mention, scenes that need to give the appearance of depth without a real discussion. Quite frankly, the other problems lies in when how the creator views it differs from how the audience does. I could say "Hey, was not the rape of Bol's family such a romantic/awesome/erotic moment? Let us play a soundtrack indicating so!" Except the music doesn't change the instory context, it is just as horrible as anything else in Akame Ga Kill, plot wise and how poorly written it is.


To sum it all up:

-Poor writing cannot be masked by music, and music cannot be used to carry a scene. Music is the cherry on top, but far too often it has been used as a farcical way to have the audience go from one end of the emotional spectrum to another without effort, or actually letting them make up how they feel about the scene without interference.

-It can be a great tool, but as it gives audience's insight to the creators' minds, it can also be used to deduce several things regarding how they view events, horrendous or otherwise.

In short? Sarah Mclachlan's songs are well known for how effective they are in inducing sadness and guilt. Google search ASPCA Commercial Sarah Mclachlan Song.



I have to agree and disagree.
Music cannot pull an idea or story entirely. However the contextualisation of small pieces of dialogue that build up over time, is frankly given power by the music in the background.

It can be down to one's personal opinion whether a script has been amazingly or horrifyingly written and this comes down to someones personal opinion, whether they have seen the source material (Novel, Light Novel, Manga or other film or show) and finally whether they can understand the directors vision.

Now with saying that you could put various soundtracks to a single scene, the issue there is that for a show a development has been made so that the soundtrack being made will have a song that will fit to a specific scene or there will be a song that will be used to conduct the emotions of its listeners when a certain emotion wants to be felt more than others.

People can purely have their own distinct opinions on varying matters and I'm not going to tell you yours or mine is the answer that sums up everything into a gratifying round of applause. However it can be said that music can massively effect a TV show or film (movie), In ways like the use of Leitmotifs, A grand stave orchestral or a common theme that slowly builds each time to a new piece in the soundtrack that inherently gives a scene colour (not literally but you get the idea).

Imagine Avatar without its music. Or Harry Potter without its use of creative Leitmotifs. Then it wouldn't be whole would it.


That is exactly what I am saying, though I admit, I am far too cynical with the number of instances it is used incorrectly. I am saying that music cannot carry a scene, and I am saying that musics work to provide context of what is intended by the author, but you are also correct that it may be a way to communicate what everyone is feeling in the scene when visual cues are not that visible.

I am not concluding that music is an inherently insidious tool, but that it can be, and often is for subpar works. It boils down to a reason similar to why some anime girls are drawn in a kawaiiesque manner; to invoke sympathy on our inherent attraction to cute persons and things, such as kittens, puppies, children, etc.

I love music. Tracks like Duel of the Fates are incredible, the symphony for The Legend of Zelda made works like Breath of the Wild simply breath taking. It can enhance a scene beyond what we normally feel to the point of total immersion, whereas other works are more forceful, one way or another, which is what I criticize and dislike.


I just realised how far and how much complexity has gone into this "Argument"
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32 / M / Bellingham WA, USA
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Posted 8/4/17
I'm an Overlord fan. The anime intrigued me so I started reading the LN after the first episode aired. Just waiting for the 12th novel to come out now.
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