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Posted 2/16/08
I'm truely sorry people, This should have been the first forum topic I should had put up. I hope you all will find these infomation useful to you.
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Posted 2/16/08
Convention checklist and tips:
Use this list as a guide to take with you when you’re promoting your work in an exhibit at a manga convention. Change and improvise this list to meet your specific.

Promotional materials
- Postcards
- Business cards
- Flyers
- Buttons
- Stickers

Selling materials
- Prints
- T-shirts
- Original art
- Mini comic book
- Protective manga and print sleeves
- Basic drawing materials

Other essentials
- Tablecloth
- Banners and stands
- Bookstands
- Money box or safe
- Inventory checklist
- Food
- Moving cart and storage boxes
- Another warm body
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Posted 2/16/08
Is it impossible to become a mangaka in Japan even though you are not of Japanese origin?

No, but that road is a difficult one. And I mean it! One person in thousands may achieve it! You will have to forego many things and be willing to lead a hard life... or to have no life at all. Are you ready for that? Let´s see!
To understand what I mean try to spend all your free time on your manga project. If you still go to school - it´s the time AFTER you finished your homework and have eaten! School is important and becoming a mangaka is no excuse for neglecting it! Do that for one month, no matter hownice the sun is shining outside or how you friends want to spend time with you or how you are in a slump and don´t want to draw at all. You think it´s hard? Try doing it for a year ´cause THAT is the type of life a mangaka leads. You think it´s about fame and money? No! Most of his time a mangaka spends in his room/studio drawing drawing drawing and there are only a few who can live of it. Are you willing to cope with that? Good, you may continue reading! If not, just give up.

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Posted 2/16/08
It won´t be easy and there is no guarantee you will succeed. But if you want to try anyway, here are some tips:

1. Learn Japanese culture and language! You WILL need it and there is NO way around it. Study it if you can! It will make things easier. But do not neglect your school or your job. You may need a second job to support you.

2. Develop your own style. It doesn´t mean that it does not have to be manga. It just has to be YOUR style and YOURS only. People have to look at your drawings and know that YOU drew it and not Akira Toriyama, Kaori Yuki or Takeshi Obata. In order for a Japanese publisher to choose you your style has to be unique! Without that you won´t succeed.

3. Develop your own stories and please let them be about things you understand! You don´t have a chance with a story about Yumi who lives in Tokyo and who is madly in love with Kaoru who doesn´t recognize her. With this kind of stories you won´t have any chance with a Japanese publisher. Use the country you live in and your knowledge about it. You live in US? Make the story happen in US! You live in Spain? Be it Spain! You live in Germany? Be it Germany! Make use of your knowledge! Are you in a band or are you obsessed with hamsters? Use it! Make a story about music or the adventures of your hamster! Your knowledge of this matter makes the stories authentic! Nothing is more worse than cliché (exept when you are doing parody)! Try to think of something original!
The friend of mine who is publishing right now in Japan is doing a pretty crazy story called "Like Evil" about a boy who became a singer in a band whose prior singer disappeared. Where to? Well... there are rumours that he was eaten by the bassist. XD (Whose classmates also seem to disappear from time to time...) THAT is an original story! And it is authentic as he is also a singer in a band.

4. Before trying to publish something in Japan try publishing in your home country! Aside from it being extremely helpful to your skills it also increases your chances. I had a chance to talk to some editors from such publishing companies as Shueisha and Hakusensha and the first thing I was told every time was this - "Publish something in your country first!" There are few Japanese artists who got to publish something just after applying. Most of them spend time assisting already established artists in order to gain experience. Lots of them give up though. Sooo why should they take a risk with a gaijin?

5. Establish connections! That does not mean to hump every Japanese you encounter! But if you have the chance, get to know people who already work in the field! If you already have published something in your country you will have it easier. Do not be pushy! Take your time and get to know the people. Exchange business cards! Exchange gifts! This way the people will remember you and have a good opinion of you!
Generally you will need to have business cards ready when dealing with Japanese. So don´t forget them! wink Okay?

6. If you achieved everything mentioned above you may consider taking part in a contest that many manga magazines hold. That is the easiest way for a gaijin to get into the Japanese industry. Or you will need REALLY good connections. XD

7. Even if you succeed, be ready to earn very little money. It´s important to have other job opportunities in order to support you. It´s not easy to work in Japan or better say... it´s very difficult to get a working visa. You won´t get a working visa just because you want to become mangaka. It´s as simple as that. And with a tourist visa you are not allowed to work (but you can try to make connections). If you are in the age between 18 and 25 you may consider getting a working holiday visa. With this you are allowed to live in Japan for one year and work there. Use it! If a publisher wants you, it will help organize you a real working visa.

8. There are different ways to publish in Japan - one is working for a magazine and the other is by publishing tankobons. It happens often that you have first to pulbish your work in a magazine and then have it pulbished in tankobons but there are also cases (especially people working for smaller publishing companies) who publish their work as tankobons. One of the writers I have worked with in the past has a Japanese penpal who is the wife of such a mangaka. She told me he had to do a normal job in order to survive and feed his family as he is only paid, when his book is finished. See it like this:

You start working on the book -> No payment -> Book in progress -> No payment -> Book finished -> You get paid

And it might take 6-12 months for the book to be finished.... So depending on you speed you will be paid once or twice a year.
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Posted 2/16/08
How do you become a mangaka in your country first?

The easiest way to have your work published is to go to a publisher and present him your works. What do you have to think of when doing it?

1. You need an original story. There is NO way a publisher will published a work with the story or characters that´s already there. This means: no Naruto-inspired comics where the only things that differ are the names of the characters or the country. As I already told you - use the knowledge you have and things you know. And do a good research!
One of the biggest mistakes you can do is to do a neverending story. I know that your idols in Japan has published dozens of books and so on but NO PUBLISHER EVER will allow a beginner to do a long story. Do with a short story or one book at first.

2. Go check out your publishers. Write mails to them. Meet them on conventions and book fairs! Ask them whether they are interested in publishing manga at all. Sometimes it even happens that a book publisher start publishing manga! Get their business cards! XD And apply!

3. For an application you will need

- a brief discription of your story from beginning to end (it SHOULD have an ending!)
- at least 10 finished pages and some WIP pages
- characterdesigns (means... you have to show the character from different angles and with various facial expressions)
- illustrations
- sketches of things that are important in your story - buildings, settings, clothes, weapons and so on

One things you must understand - the better you prepare your application, the better are your chances with the publishers. Be as efficient and professional as you can. But also be aware that you might be rejected. Most people are rejected when they first try, though there people who are lucky. My advice - be PREPARED to be rejected! Are you rejected - learn from it and apply again!
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Posted 2/17/08
Setting Up Your Studio

When you have the materials you need, set up a proper environment so that you can work productively. The basics of setting up a place to work in the beginning are quite simple. You need a chair, a table to draw on, and a light source bright enough that you don’t strain your eyes. It’s actually that simple.

Finding a quiet place to draw

Although no single right solution works for everybody, try to identify some distractions that prevent you from concentrating on your work. Be proactive in getting the most out of your working environment. You may find the best place for you to work is as the kitchen table or the coffee table in your living room.

When looking around for a good place to work, keep track of your time to see how much you can accomplish in 30 minutes without having to stand up or leave your drawing table. Are you able to do it? Next, try to work for 45 minutes and then for a full hour. This exercise helps you to gauge your work productivity.
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25 / F / Nansai Osaka, Jap...
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Posted 2/18/08
But the part about being a mangaka isnt always hard nor simple if you reallie love drawing and your passion reallie is to become a mangaka than im rooting for you but if you just wanna be a mangaka because its cool and because it gives you a reason to learn japanese and its culture and that you want people tp look up to you htinking ohh he/she is cool with all of his/her mangas than your becoming a mangaka for the wrong reason and will probably regret it cause i've known quite a few people that regretted becoming a mangaka it may be fuun after getting your first novel out and to know that others will be reading your manga but you always have to be better then everyone else your story has to be interesting and its not a easy a path if you dont have connections to the manga industry.my cousin has been through all that so he probably knows it first-handed and remember if you are gonna be a mangaka be prepared for anything and any deadline.

~good luck to anyone who still wants to become a mangaka if you wanna know anything ask me
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Posted 2/26/08
OMG! That was soooooooo helpfull. Thanx a lot!

I REALLY want to be a manga-ka, and this has given me some great tips
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25 / F / Pennsylvania
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Posted 2/27/08
This was really helpful!! I wanted to be a manga-ka for about 2 years now, so I really wanted to know more about this career choice.
I never really planned to move to Japan to become a manga artist there...I wanted to be published by Tokyopop here in America, since I'm not Japanese. I was told that manga-ka's aren't paid much, but I'm up for it As long as it can pay rent, food, clothes, and my occasional otaku needs(MANGA!) I'm fine!! I probably won't submit anything until I'm anything to Tokyopop until Im in college for a little while...
Posted 3/10/08
how can u keep your-self on track when making a manga?
also i need someone to explain a story-line to me? i used ot know what it meant but i totally forgot

thses are the only questions i can think of for now....please asnwer them even if u think there stupid
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Posted 3/11/08

kodieloiler wrote:

how can u keep your-self on track when making a manga?
also i need someone to explain a story-line to me? i used ot know what it meant but i totally forgot

thses are the only questions i can think of for now....please asnwer them even if u think there stupid


Well personally to stay on track for myself I try to work on it about 4 days a week. Even if its just scripting (which helps alot!!!) it's something

Unfortunatly I can't really explain the storyline thing for you though I wish I could...it's kinda hard putting it into words....I guess like a series of events that happen during your manga...? I'm sorry that probably sucked ._.
Posted 3/11/08
dont worry i searched for it on the internet so i know what it means now AND THANK YAZZZZZZZ
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23 / F / logitude:3degrees...
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Posted 3/12/08
how do u make good backgrounds?? and do i need to buy new pens when the ink finishes??O_o oh, and do u draw on A4 paper or do u do 2 pages in one page??O_o(srry if these Qs are stupid...-___-)
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Posted 3/15/08
I don't have time to read this.
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