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Post Reply Do you ever play with math?
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Posted 8/22/17 , edited 8/23/17
Yup like this

X^2
2X

I just solved one of the highest math problem in secondary schools.
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Posted 8/22/17 , edited 8/23/17
That only works if X=2.....
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Posted 8/23/17 , edited 8/23/17

namealreadytaken wrote:


zero356 wrote:
Speaking of fun pure math, though, has anyone else noticed that the differences in squares forms the sequence of odd numbers?

0 to 1 is a difference of 1
1 to 4 is a difference of 3
4 to 9 is a difference of 5
9 to 16 is a difference of 7
16 to 25 is a difference of 9
25 to 36 is a difference of 11
36 to 49 is a difference of 13
49 to 64 is a difference of 15
And so on (I presume, I haven't proven it)


And for anyone interested in fun number stuff in general, try this
https://www.youtube.com/user/numberphile


let n be any integer.
(n+1)^2 - n^2
= n^2 + 2n + 1 - n^2
= 2n + 1
which is always odd, so the difference of two consecutive squares is always odd.

for more "serious" puzzlers, there's the riddler
puzzles comes from different areas of math. sometimes you need to use your creativity / intuition to solve the puzzle.


Yeah, I was actually thinking about that after posting.
Surprisingly simple, just have to work it out

and the Riddler looks cool, if a bit low priority on my list of things to do right now (high, but classes and other things to learn and books to read n and people to talk to; I do love a could puzzle)
Posted 8/23/17 , edited 8/23/17
i can barely do division and multiplication without a calculator :/
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Posted 8/23/17 , edited 8/23/17
Actually, no. I hate math.
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Posted 8/23/17 , edited 8/24/17
Work= ForceXDistance or Work=fXd
Force = Mass X Acceleration or f=mXd
Work thus equalls m X a X d, or Work = mad
Mad= Crazy
Therefore work = crazy
This means Work is Crazy
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Posted 8/23/17 , edited 8/23/17
I play with Excel at work.

Well, I say "play" it's more like "fight with".

Oh yeah, it says it'll print on one page, but what do I get in reality? 1 quarter on each page.

Pick up the damn phone IT department and fix your damn network printers.
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Posted 8/23/17 , edited 8/23/17
When I first read that topic, first thing come to mind is this..(Remember the Movie Revenge of the Nerd)? :P





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Posted 8/23/17 , edited 8/23/17
I thought it said "Do you ever play with meth?" at first... well, in any case, the answer to both questions is no.
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Posted 8/23/17 , edited 8/24/17


That's so derivative.
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Posted 8/23/17 , edited 8/24/17

jtjumper wrote:



That's so derivative.



Had to say it! ;p

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Posted 8/24/17 , edited 8/25/17

zero356 wrote:
How remedial?
I'm an engineering major, so understanding the levels of math is kind of interesting to me.


As for historical texts,
Look at the Golden Age of Islam for basically everything algebra
The Greeks were top dogs for Geometry (and logic, and least the basics)
And for calculus, look at Newtons' Principia Mathematica


Algebra 1 and geometry, at the moment. I probably could have started part way through Algebra 2, but I wanted to take the chance to use material I'm pretty confident with to really study and work things out in several ways. Really, it would be more accurate to say I'm not so much relearning math right now, as trying to train myself to think a particular way. List every step on paper, check answers even when I'm certain, etc. I always got good grades in high school, but if I'm being honest, I was a crappy student. I was really lazy, never studied, left most of the work off paper if I could get away with it to save writing and notebook space, and occasionally skipped homework if my grades were in good shape. I was really lucky to have a good memory. So that's what I'm really up against: my own bad habits, and lost time.

I shouldn't need help for a while, but if I get to a point where I do, I might hit you up if it's ok.

As far as historical texts, I did once try to read Euclid's Elements, but the writing absolutely baffled me. "A point is that which has no part." What? "That all right angles equal one another." So, you're telling me that a right angle is a right angle? "A surface is that which has length and breadth only." I mean, I get it, but would kill him to tell us specifically what else it might have had, but apparently lacks? It's two extra words: "No depth."
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Posted 8/24/17 , edited 8/25/17
No... I consider it work, not play...
Posted 8/24/17 , edited 8/25/17
Nope.
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Posted 8/24/17 , edited 8/25/17

foraslan wrote:


zero356 wrote:
How remedial?
I'm an engineering major, so understanding the levels of math is kind of interesting to me.


As for historical texts,
Look at the Golden Age of Islam for basically everything algebra
The Greeks were top dogs for Geometry (and logic, and least the basics)
And for calculus, look at Newtons' Principia Mathematica


Algebra 1 and geometry, at the moment. I probably could have started part way through Algebra 2, but I wanted to take the chance to use material I'm pretty confident with to really study and work things out in several ways. Really, it would be more accurate to say I'm not so much relearning math right now, as trying to train myself to think a particular way. List every step on paper, check answers even when I'm certain, etc. I always got good grades in high school, but if I'm being honest, I was a crappy student. I was really lazy, never studied, left most of the work off paper if I could get away with it to save writing and notebook space, and occasionally skipped homework if my grades were in good shape. I was really lucky to have a good memory. So that's what I'm really up against: my own bad habits, and lost time.

I shouldn't need help for a while, but if I get to a point where I do, I might hit you up if it's ok.

As far as historical texts, I did once try to read Euclid's Elements, but the writing absolutely baffled me. "A point is that which has no part." What? "That all right angles equal one another." So, you're telling me that a right angle is a right angle? "A surface is that which has length and breadth only." I mean, I get it, but would kill him to tell us specifically what else it might have had, but apparently lacks? It's two extra words: "No depth."


Well good for you

And I would agree on thinking part. I'm no educator, but part of the problem with current math science education is too much focus on what and not enough on why.
Knowing how to do it is very important, especially since Algebra (II) is something most careers will use in some point and is useful for everyday life.Calculus, not so much.

But knowing why is or what it means is also important.

Knowing that solving an algebra equations is just systematically undoing what has been to the variable is important. It means that no matter the problem or variation on what you've seen, you can still do it because the base process is the same.

For Calculus and derivatives, understanding that slope = rate of change = derivative is huge from an application standpoint.
I encourage you ask me about that because if it the derivative is not explained as being literally the slope formula, your teacher/resource did it wrong.
And I just love that one part of math too much to let it go untouched.


On a tangent, science is a similar way. I'd rather have high school science be about statistics, understanding bias, setting up an experiment, breaking down cause and effect, component parts, rephrasing questions, etc. and just using the actual science as the mode to demonstrate those things. Because, speaking as an engineer, no average person needs to no exactly how gravity works.



And unfortunately, on the writings, that's just
A) the nature of logical/mathematical proof
B) how the Greeks did things


Good first choice. Euclid is the father of geometry.
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