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Death Penalty Debate
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25 / F / Soon to be SCAD
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Posted 5/5/07
I think the matter there is who they are putting in prisons. Most of them are petty thefts and drug charges. Nothing that would have recieved the death sentance anyway.
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27 / M / vegass
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Posted 5/5/07
no actually we have a large amount of people that would be on death row if we had them. even if it werent so, without the death penalty, it would still be over crowding anywhere. i just dont see a way around it..unless we freeze death row convicts in ice..and then leave them in the antarctic or something. thats almost as plausible as the snipers nest idea (sarcasm) joke joke
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M / Aboard the Hyperion
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Posted 5/5/07
You know how budget is wasted when people are waiting in deathrow. I say let them have the life in prison without parole as the maximum sentence and get rid of DP. It really is not effective in reducing crime because it still happens and more people are still being put in deathrow. Besides life in prison is more harsh than an easy death with respect to the degree of their convictions.
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Posted 5/5/07
Can you provide me with a link to show numbers? I'm just curious, I know the national average is filled with mostly minor drug charges. I'm curious why Nevada would have built up so many 'death row' inmates.
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Posted 5/5/07
“For centuries the death penalty, often accompanied by barbarous refinements, has been trying to hold crime in check; yet crime persists. Why? Because the instincts that are warring in man are not, as the law claims, constant forces in a state of equilibrium.”
~Albert Camus

Getting sleepy so I rather post links you might find interesting:
http://www.amherst.edu/askphilosophers/question/1404
http://www.amherst.edu/askphilosophers/question/1502
http://www.deathpenaltyinfo.org/article.php?did=108&scid=7

*Long ones
http://ethics.sandiego.edu/Applied/deathpenalty/
http://plato.stanford.edu/entries/punishment/

ZZzzz
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27 / M / vegass
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Posted 5/5/07
actually forgive me. nevada does have the death penalty instituted. how embarassing. ok i think thatll pretty much shut me up. again i apologize.
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25 / F / Soon to be SCAD
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Posted 5/5/07
Thank you mauz, always the one to supply support and quotes. Enjoy your rest, you earned it in links.
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Posted 5/5/07
This situation is too complicated to be resolved by a blanket law, which unfortunately is the best our justice system could do.

If I could change something, it would be the 10 year wait anticipating your death.

It would be fascist for me to implement my personal views, but I may as well say them to give a different perspective.

1. The world is approaching the upper limits of population.
2. Crimes increase as population density increase.
3. Almost all of the people who are imprisoned are unproductive.
4. Too much money is spent on prison systems. Transients have been known to commit crimes in order to get access to the facilities.
5. Being a criminal is a lifelong stigma in our society which prevents rehabilitation. With a record you get stuck with a shitty job and no trust from anyone.
6. Our justice system is flawed. Many improvements could be attempted, such as compensation for people who have shown clear headed judgments in past cases to come and act as a jury again, still maintaining that they have no contact with the individuals with the crime, of course.
7. Prisons are ineffective for the chief goal that they are designed. For every hardened criminal that sees the light, there is a young kid busted on his first shop lifting attempt who can't make bail who gets picked up by a drug kingpin while in jail. It is a gathering grounds for crime. The atmosphere, even without the implicit intent to subvert (as in the drug kingpin example), is something you don't come back from easily.

And no offense, but the religious arguments are basically tautologies. Not only that, there are counter examples. To say that you don't have the right to judge someone else is to say that you should have no influence at all in the world. Any one of your actions could kill a person. The chances of you having a car accident and killing your passenger are probably about the same as you sentencing someone to death. Knowing that, are you still going to allow people to drive in your car? Is it considered suicide if you play Russian Roulette with a 1/100 chance of a bullet coming out, if you are allowed to pick a fight with a guy mugging your girlfriend, with a 1/100 chance of you being killed?
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22 / F / suh-luh-mihn
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Posted 5/7/07

Jozephz wrote:

So the death penalty is bad because innocents sometimes get killed, but life imprisonment isn't? What about the innocents who are sent to jail for ten, twenty years, maybe even life? Is that better? This is what I don't understand. Someone convicted with murder should be given a choice between imprisonment or death. Why should a murderer take up the space of a jail cell when said space is limited? you mentioned this:

"Will a quick death teach them a lesson than having to rot in jail and keep thinking of their major mistake?"

True enough, but rot in jail and then what? Die? What is the difference between killing a murderer and letting him 'think about what he's done wrong' before dying in a prison cell? They can't repent. Even if they do realise that they've done wrong, most are just gonna have to remain imprisoned until death anyway. I'd rather give them the choice.


Well, it's true they're going to die eventually. But what would you prefer, a quick death without learning from your past mistakes? Or a slow death, but having learned from your past mistake?

Okay, I have my own theory. I think that 'ghosts' or spirits stayed here on Earth is that they have to learn something. Pretend someone commited murders, therefore his soul would go to hell. They would still be here on Earth, MAYBE, to realize what they've done to deserve that fate. Get it?

Even if you choose a quick death or a slow one, you still have to face it in the after life (to those who believe it) IF you haven't learned from it while living.

That's what I think anyway.
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Posted 5/7/07
Ghosts/spirits are unnecessary baggage especially in this issue.
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23 / M / U.K
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Posted 5/7/07

MicherreVenette15 wrote:


Jozephz wrote:

So the death penalty is bad because innocents sometimes get killed, but life imprisonment isn't? What about the innocents who are sent to jail for ten, twenty years, maybe even life? Is that better? This is what I don't understand. Someone convicted with murder should be given a choice between imprisonment or death. Why should a murderer take up the space of a jail cell when said space is limited? you mentioned this:

"Will a quick death teach them a lesson than having to rot in jail and keep thinking of their major mistake?"

True enough, but rot in jail and then what? Die? What is the difference between killing a murderer and letting him 'think about what he's done wrong' before dying in a prison cell? They can't repent. Even if they do realise that they've done wrong, most are just gonna have to remain imprisoned until death anyway. I'd rather give them the choice.


Well, it's true they're going to die eventually. But what would you prefer, a quick death without learning from your past mistakes? Or a slow death, but having learned from your past mistake?


Maybe you'd learn, but to what end? Your still going to die...if you get life you'll likely never have a chance at repenting for your crimes...and if there *is* an afterlife, why not just learn from your mistakes there? And if there is no afterlife...well it dosen't really matter. Cause you won't be there.
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25 / M
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Posted 5/7/07
^You think they kill em right away? People on Death Row get plenty of time to repent.
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23 / M / none of ur business
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Posted 5/7/07
I'm againzt it 'cause, well, I just am against it.
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25 / F / Soon to be SCAD
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Posted 5/7/07

SeraphAlford wrote:

^You think they kill em right away? People on Death Row get plenty of time to repent.


Not always the situation. Granted, it isn't speedy by any means, but in no way plenty of time. Also the case not may be to repent. Some people may see it as a greater form of punishment. Someone I know did something that wound them up with a hefty sentance. They don't regret doing it and probably never will, but they do hate prison.

If they do not fear death, it really isn't much of a punishment.

(Keep in mind I don't think prison should be a place of punishment, simply throwing in some other perspectives)
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Posted 5/7/07
Repentance is a Christian thing usually. Repent and be saved in the afterlife. In other cases I believe that understanding the gravity of your acts would just be torture for a person. In the Christian case, you shouldn't be allowed to kill a person because of the whole "Thou Shalt Not Kill" thing.

I'm too callous of a person to try to convincingly argue against the length of imprisonment being used for a chance of freedom through better understanding of a case through new technologies or developments.

Bill Hicks has a great quote on this subject. "Capitol punishment? How cruel! And unimaginative! Put 'em in the movies! Jeffrey Dahmer, for your crimes against humanity, I sentence you to Wes Craven's next movie."
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