Anime vs. Real Life: Rascal Does Not Dream of Bunny Girl Senpai [Part 3]

Check out more of the real-world locations of Rascal Does Not Dream of Bunny Girl Senpai

From Enoshima to the coastal area of Fujisawa, to Fujisawa City itself, we’ll wrap up the coverage of the real-world locations of Rascal Does Not Dream of Bunny Girl Senpai in this third installment! The anime’s scrupulously accurate portrayal of its real-world setting has been exceptional, and over a whopping 150 comparison images should be telling of that. It’s not only the show’s more touristy places that were depicted with a meticulous attention to detail; also it’s more mundane, humdrum locations have been rendered with great care and are true to life. In turn, the setting’s authenticity helps to sell the show’s relatively understated supernatural elements, making it almost believable that there really are people with ‘puberty syndrome’ roaming around the streets of Fujisawa. And the streets of Fujisawa are exactly what we’re going to look at today.

 

In case you missed it, here are Part 1 and Part 2.

 

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We’ll pick up right where we left off last week: at Fujisawa Enoden Station, linking Fujisawa to Kamakura via Enoshima. While by far not the fastest option, it certainly is the most appealing due to its scenic route along the coast and its charming vintage train cars. But just like in the anime, these tend to get quite crowded, with students in the morning and tourists during the day.

 

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The station gets a lot of screen time due to Sakuta and Mai having to get on here to get to school every day.

 

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Even the Enoshima ad with Mt. Fuji in the background has been recreated in the anime, although slightly different.

 

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It’s only a short walk (or sprint) from Fujisawa Enoden Station over the footbridge to JR Fujisawa Station.

 

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JR Fujisawa Station gets prominently featured in the show’s catchy opening, but Sakuta and Mai mostly just pass through here on their way home.

 

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However, inside of the station is also the pastry shop that Mai often stops by on her way home. The anime’s Gold Bakery has been modeled after the station’s Maple House shop.

 

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And after trying one of their custard-filled buns myself, I’ll have to admit that I now completely understand why not being able to buy them was Mai’s seemingly biggest problem with turning invisible to the world. But don’t worry; you don’t actually have to travel all the way out here to try them, since Emily put together a great guide to make them yourself.

 

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Mai’s condition had been getting worse in the second episode, which is why Sakuta had to use the payphone inside the station to ask Futaba for advice. They then decided to take a spontaneous trip to Ogaki in Gifu Prefecture (which was the setting of A Silent Voice), but only stayed in close proximity to the station there.

 

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The station’s floor map has not been changed in the anime.  

 

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JR Fujisawa Station’s North Entrance.

 

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Located in the center of Kanagawa Prefecture, and a good hour away from Tokyo, Fujisawa is a highly popular tourist destination. However, most tourists usually just head down south to the coastal area and to the island of Enoshima, both of which are under the city’s jurisdiction. The city itself doesn’t really have any tourist attractions, which is what I meant by this article being more about the show’s mundane spots.

 

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The overpass around the station, where a lot of the show’s scenes take place, is unfortunately under construction at the moment.

 

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Futaba was shopping at BiC Camera.

 

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StEP is a cram school located in the building behind Futaba here, but the anime changed its name to StoP in the show. Not sure if the cram school is going to be all too happy about that name change.

 

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It’s about a ten minutes’ walk from the station to Sakuta’s workplace, Benny’s (or Denny’s in real life) one of Japan’s largest family restaurant chains. I did want to eat there, but left as soon as I found out that they really don’t serve any “are-you-serious-about-Tomoe” there.

 

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Unlike the front side, the backside of the family restaurant does look a bit different in the anime.

 

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From the restaurant it’s about another 10 minutes’ walk to the next location, which you can all find on the map I put together down below. 

 

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The locations here look pretty much exactly like they do in the anime; my only complaint is that Sakuta and Tomoe should’ve been turning right here, as they end up on Taisho Bridge in the next scene.

 

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They both share a heartfelt moment here on the small Taisho Bridge, one of the many bridges crossing the city’s Sakai River.

 

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Parking in the anime is actually more expensive than it is in real life, although they at least kept the hourly prices the same.  

 

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7-Eleven has been turned into 24 and the Lawson on the opposite side of the street has been turned into a Lanson in the anime. 

 

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I usually always map out all the locations I visit before my trips, but this one right here I actually only stumbled upon while on my pilgrimage, which is always a nice experience.

 

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The Sakai River again.

 

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Right after the bridge comes the slope leading up to Goshogaya Park, although the street was better lit in real life.

 

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Here’s the same slope a little further down during the day. Sakuta and Mai both live in the area here, which is why get to see them head down here quite often.

 

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Goshogaya Park has certainly been one of the show’s key locations so far. Sakuta had his first encounters with both Tomoe and Shoko here, and also Mai and her half-sister shared an important moment here in last week’s episode.  

 

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Completely unrelated to the caption, the building on the left has actually finished construction in real life.

 

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I can assure you, no butt-kicking activities were going on there at the time of my visit.

 

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I was quite disappointed that it was raining most of the time while I was there, but at least some of the comparisons match up better because of the rain.

 

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Sakuta’s first encounter with the mysterious Shoko also happened in Goshogaya Park, where Shoko found a stray kitten.

 

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But instead of a stray kitty, all I encountered there was this majestic pink horse(?).

 

And that concludes my very extensive coverage of Rascal Does Not Dream of Bunny Girl Senpai’s real-world locations. As you can hopefully tell, the anime’s highly detailed backgrounds do a fantastic job portraying Fujisawa, and I’m really excited to see which other places we’ll get to see in the few remaining episodes.

 

Locations from this article are marked with purple pins on the map. Enoshima locations from Part 1 are orange, and the ones around Fujisawa’s coastal area from Part 2 are green.

 

 

Were you surprised by the accuracy of the show’s backgrounds? Is there maybe any place from the anime you’d like to visit yourself? Let us know in the comments!

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Wilhelm is an anime tourist, who loves to search for and uncover the real-world spots he sees in anime. You can talk with him on Twitter @Surwill

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