Anime that reinforced the individual vs. the group
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Posted 9/9/17 , edited 9/9/17
In my case, I'd like to include the majority of mecha anime I watched from beginning to end. On an individual level, you have an ace pilot piloting a super prototype/ace custom fighting an intimate one-on-one duel against another ace pilot in his/her own super prototype/ace custom. But when you bring up the group, you'd get a single commanding officer rallying together an army of mass-production models in order to fight against another commanding officer and his own army of mass-production models, with the goal for each mass-produced mecha army to capture or kill the other's CO while protecting its own CO.



I'd also like to include Kamen Rider and Super Sentai, with the former working alone and the latter working in a group. And Kirito and Shiroe from SAO and Log Horizon, respectively, the former at his best as a one-man army, the latter working at his best in a strategic leadership position. And Mazinger Z as compared to Getter Robo, the former a solo super robot, the latter a combining super robot.

Which anime did you think reinforced the individual as opposed to the group, and why?
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Posted 9/9/17 , edited 9/16/17
Well I'll try to mention whatever comes to mind. There might be some vague spoilers.


Reinforcing the individual characters is something that is very hard to do well, because if the character is not well fleshed out, it will make the show dull, that is why recently many anime studios have been scared to create action anime with original and daring ideas, and they stick with the two safe paths: Either make a veeeryyy long anime that enforces the group (naurto, one piece etc.), or make a slice of life/moe/fantasy anime. I mean seriously cmon we are getting like 1 serious action anime and like 10 moe animes each season it's very depressing.

I know I'm going off topic but I need to vent about this somehow. Japanese people have very different tastes than us, most of their otakus only care about the moe stuff so the studios give them what they want, on the contrary, western audiences enjoy other things, but anime studios don't care about what western people think, because we don't pay them money, hell, 99% of us just watch pirated on random websites then we complain about why anime studios don't make anime that we like anymore, I mean yes, there are many exceptional anime each season, but compared to the ones that were released between 2000-2010 they don't hold a candle. #PleaseBuyAnimeDontPirateIt

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Posted 9/11/17 , edited 9/11/17
The Bakemonogatari anime series may enforce this conflict to some extend but this could not be a typical example; each characters in this anime series have their own individual goal as well as their collective goal and they can change their individual goal as the plot progress.
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Posted 9/12/17 , edited 9/12/17

indiekid wrote:

Reinforcing the individual characters is something that is very hard to do well, because if the character is not well fleshed out, it will make the show dull, that is why recently many anime studios have been scared to create action anime with original and daring ideas, and they stick with the two safe paths: Either make a veeeryyy long anime that enforces the group (naurto, one piece etc.), or make a slice of life/moe/fantasy anime. I mean seriously cmon we are getting like 1 serious action anime and like 10 moe animes each season it's very depressing.

I know I'm going off topic but I need to vent about this somehow. Japanese people have very different tastes than us, most of their otakus only care about the moe stuff so the studios give them what they want, on the contrary, western audiences enjoy other things, but anime studios don't care about what western people think, because we don't pay them money, hell, 99% of us just watch pirated on random websites then we complain about why anime studios don't make anime that we like anymore, I mean yes, there are many exceptional anime each season, but compared to the ones that were released between 2000-2010 they don't hold a candle. #PleaseBuyAnimeDontPirateIt



If you genuinely believe that then you haven't even seen the majority of seasonal anime. Because action shows have always been the most numerous out of every genre...

Also moe is not a type of anime...
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27 / F / Various
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Posted 9/12/17 , edited 9/12/17
Not to mention that those of us who like male moe characters are pretty much screwed, because the source material for those anime never get licensed or released outside of Japan.

Speaking of which, actually...

Episode 9 of Marginal #4 ( http://www.crunchyroll.com/marginal-4-the-animation/episode-9-summer-reminiscence-of-cambria-728875 ) is basically about how, in order to work together as a group, they needed to think of their individualism and differences as a strength, rather than a weakness. That they don't need to be all the same, and submerge their unique qualities, in order to be a group. This is reinforced in episode 12 when


So it's sort of both.

Idol shows end up being a lot like sentai shows, don't they?

anyway, mg4 is the most underrated show and you should watch it.
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23 / M / US
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Posted 9/12/17 , edited 9/13/17
No titles to drop because I can't think through this properly right now

BUT, for further investigation

Look into the great man v. marxist (I think that's what's it called) versions of interpretting history
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Posted 9/15/17 , edited 9/15/17
Two immediately came to mind: Hourou Musuko Wandering Son, and AURA. To a lesser extent, Love, Chunibuyo and Other Delusions...
AURA is an extreme example, "The nail that sticks out will be hammered down" and portrays the Japanese social view (as in- NOT an American one) on what it means to be unique, and its painful consequences. I read negative reviews about it, because the current American attitude is that it is essentially wrongheaded for people to be rejected for refusing to conform.
I have more of a problem with this attitude than I did with the anime, it's a reminder that frequently we need to take off our America-Only hats and recognize we're viewing another culture, when we view anime.
Love, Chunibuyo and Other Delusions I only mention because it has to do with the same issues as Aura but is much more lighthearted and fun.

Hourou Musuko deals with a cross-dressing boy, but I'd say the group's response toward [the mc] Nitori, is not actually as negative as it probably would be in reality (at least more than 10 years ago). If I wanted to point to something that an individualistic person would find the most inspiring, this one would be it- but it doesn't pull its punches and the characters deal with some difficult stuff.
This also makes me think of H2O-Footprints in the Sand which also has a crossdressing character, and whose experience is closer to what happens in Aura, in otherwords, quite painful. I haven't finished that one so haven't figured out its actual message yet.
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Posted 9/15/17 , edited 9/15/17

KingKaio wrote:

Two immediately came to mind: Hourou Musuko Wandering Son, and AURA. To a lesser extent, Love, Chunibuyo and Other Delusions...
AURA is an extreme example, "The nail that sticks out will be hammered down" and portrays the Japanese social view (as in- NOT an American one) on what it means to be unique, and its painful consequences. I read negative reviews about it, because the current American attitude is that it is essentially wrongheaded for people to be rejected for refusing to conform.
I have more of a problem with this attitude than I did with the anime, it's a reminder that frequently we need to take off our America-Only hats and recognize we're viewing another culture, when we view anime.
Love, Chunibuyo and Other Delusions I only mention because it has to do with the same issues as Aura but is much more lighthearted and fun.

Hourou Musuko deals with a cross-dressing boy, but I'd say the group's response toward [the mc] Nitori, is not actually as negative as it probably would be in reality (at least more than 10 years ago). If I wanted to point to something that an individualistic person would find the most inspiring, this one would be it- but it doesn't pull its punches and the characters deal with some difficult stuff.
This also makes me think of H2O-Footprints in the Sand which also has a crossdressing character, and whose experience is closer to what happens in Aura, in otherwords, quite painful. I haven't finished that one so haven't figured out its actual message yet.


I dislike the attitude as well, and I have not seen the show in question, but I do believe criticizing cultural norms is something that should not be tabooed under the label of ignorant, otherwise we fail to recognize the benefits to criticize or be criticized, whether it be as persons with seperate histories or cultural norms.

I do think people should understand why Japan thinks like that, which is where the idea of cultural relativism is strongest, I imagine.

Just wanted to add on to the belief that I do not think criticizing a culture is inherently bad.
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40 / M / Charlotte, NC
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Posted 9/16/17 , edited 9/16/17

PeripheralVisionary wrote:



It wasn't as much a question of criticizing a culture, because most of these attitudes I speak of are typical ethnocentrism (and Americans are notorious for being somewhat self-focused) in other words, the viewer is not really aware they have these biases.
What I decry is the attitude in reviews that states "oh this anime portrays the wrong message about individuality"/"it portrays a bad example for young people" etc or similar- this is not a critique of a culture, but a critique of the anime from a badly biased point of view that fails to recognize the culture from which the story came, and those peoples' values and mores.
In fact, I'd say criticizing the culture itself- to question why it is prevalent in a country to believe certain things or find things funny we find inappropriate, is more valid because at least one is curious and is acknowledging that they do not understand the other; as opposed to stating they are flat out wrong.
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Posted 9/16/17 , edited 9/16/17

KingKaio wrote:


PeripheralVisionary wrote:



It wasn't as much a question of criticizing a culture, because most of these attitudes I speak of are typical ethnocentrism (and Americans are notorious for being somewhat self-focused) in other words, the viewer is not really aware they have these biases.
What I decry is the attitude in reviews that states "oh this anime portrays the wrong message about individuality"/"it portrays a bad example for young people" etc or similar- this is not a critique of a culture, but a critique of the anime from a badly biased point of view that fails to recognize the culture from which the story came, and those peoples' values and mores.
In fact, I'd say criticizing the culture itself- to question why it is prevalent in a country to believe certain things or find things funny we find inappropriate, is more valid because at least one is curious and is acknowledging that they do not understand the other; as opposed to stating they are flat out wrong.

Oh, I understand, I think. Criticizing a theme of the anime precisely because the theme reflects another society at odds with their's is your complaint, huh? I believe this is where the aforementioned understanding comes to mind, often because I think what we fail to realize that people often do have a sense of rationale, based on the perceived and real circumstances of another culture with its own complicated history.
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