Post Reply Patriot Day in U.S. not Patriot Day in Alaska
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Posted 9/11/17 , edited 9/12/17
Patriot Day is apparently too patriotic for Alaska's governor Walker, so he went through the actual trouble of changing the name.

http://mustreadalaska.com/governor-walker-patriot-911-day/



Patriot Day is so … patriotic. Maybe a bit too patriotic for Alaska Gov. Bill Walker.

Since 2001, Sept. 11 has been known as Patriot Day, designated first by Congress and President George W. Bush, then by President Barack Obama, and now by President Donald Trump.

Alaska governors also declared Sept. 11 Patriot Day, a day to remember the fallen, the heroes, and to honor the men and women who went to war after the terrorist attacks on U.S. soil. Many of them are in Afghanistan today in a war that has gone on a long, long time.

This year it’s Patriot Day all over America on Monday. Just not in the 49th State.

Gov. Walker has declared it “September 11 Commemoration Day,” a day where “we as Americans reflect on the importance to our nation of freedom, tolerance, patriotism, diversity, and respect for others, and are grateful for the rights and freedoms that we hold as Americans;”

This word play doesn’t happen by accident. Someone changed it from Patriot Day to Commemoration Day. Someone approved it. And the governor signed it.


Oh c'mon. It's Patriot Day in every single other state. It's even Patriot Day in California, the most liberal of the liberal, the most PC of the PC states!

Way to stick out like a sore thumb for pretty much no good reason at all.
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54 / M / In
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Posted 9/11/17 , edited 9/12/17
Well Alaska always went it's own way
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Posted 9/11/17 , edited 9/12/17
Fellow wasn't raised in the Boston area was he? Patriots' Day is April 19 since 1894 until 1969 when it was moved to the 3rd Monday in April. Commemorating the Battles of Lexington and Concord.
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Posted 9/11/17 , edited 9/12/17
that awkward moment when they are showing themselves how they shouldn't? Commemoration Day is actually an Arab thing, which they might have wanted to research unless that was their intent all along https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Commemoration_Day something is fishy here should there be a pun stated there? https://gov.alaska.gov/newsroom/2017/09/september-11th-commemoration-day-3/
Posted 9/11/17 , edited 9/12/17
Absolutely subversive.
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Posted 9/12/17 , edited 9/12/17
Meh I always thought Patriot Day sounded a tad nationalistic myself .
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Posted 9/12/17 , edited 9/12/17
Alaska is a nice place to live, if you get rid of all the politicians.
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Posted 9/12/17 , edited 9/12/17
For 16 years I didn't even realize we were calling it anything other than "September 11th" -- Alaska might have the right idea by clarifying it's a special commemoration and not just an anniversary/holiday (Patriot Day as a name sounds like a holiday, like President's Day).
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Posted 9/12/17 , edited 9/12/17

Amyas_Leigh wrote:

Absolutely subversive.




Kidding.
I understand that a state wants to give it a different name but it seems to be more of a media-focused attention grabbing attempt than anything else.
It is a tad extreme to believe that without calling it "Patriot Day" that there isn't any patriotism involved in their "September 11 Commemoration Day" activities or the emotional ties to the terrorist attacks on September 11th.
People are interesting for how quick they are to look at situations either as a politically correct statement or one that aligns with the "Nazi Regime".
This doesn't seem too terrible to me.
At the end of the day, Governor Walker performed the act of lowering the flags, which was in line with other states and their actions on September 11th.
Phrasing shouldn't be important as long as the intent is there, no?
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Posted 9/12/17 , edited 9/12/17
As a conservative, I don't have a lot of good things to say about people trying too hard to be politically correct, but I actually think that's a good change. September 11 isn't a day where incredible deeds of daring were done on our side (for the most part). It's a day when we were attacked, left defenseless in our homeland, and watched helplessly as thousands of people died. If we are going to make September 11 a holiday of sorts, then it had better be to keep those people in mind, and their loved ones who are still with us, i.e. a "Commemoration Day."

Cydoemus is right, too, in saying that there can still be a patriotic element to it, regardless of the name. So it doesn't change that much.
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Posted 9/12/17 , edited 9/12/17
There's a term for what the governor has on his mind and it's "bigotry". Specifically, "oikophobic" bigotry. Think the opposite of xenophobic bigotry.
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Posted 9/12/17 , edited 9/12/17

karatecowboy wrote:

There's a term for what the governor has on his mind and it's "bigotry". Specifically, "oikophobic" bigotry. Think the opposite of xenophobic bigotry.


This is actually incorrect.
There were no indications that he was being "Anti-American" or even "Anti-Patriotic" by signing the act of changing "Patriot Day" to "September 11 Commemoration Day".

"Oikophobia" in the context you're utilizing it was horribly misinformed as well, unfortunately.
That is if you're trying to utilize it under the same usage that Roger Scruton had once done so himself.
I implore you to read the following in order to gain a better understanding of the phrase on a politically philosophical level:
http://www.civitas.org.uk/pdf/cs49-8.pdf

Regarding the topic at hand, I am of the mind that foraslan has stated things that are congruous with my own perspective on the matter.
On 9/11, the United States of America was attacked by foreign entities where we had to sit and watch, helpless to do anything to have prevented it.
Never has this ever happened before in the history of the United States.
To focus on "Patriotism" alone rather than including it with the loss of the individuals during this attack seems to be a limited exercise of empathy of the matter.
We can have faith in our country without calling something "Patriot Day" when it was the only day in recent history that left us all in the state of absolute helplessness as we watched our fellow Americans be taken from us.
Not to say that "Patriot Day" is a horrible sin, it's more so the phrasing is irrelevant as long as the context is maintained.
I believe this is the case regardless of whether it's called "Patriot Day" or "September 11 Commemoration Day".
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