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Post Reply Your country's greatest military leader?
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29 / M / Enemy Territory
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Posted 9/16/17 , edited 9/16/17
Thought this would be a fun idea to play around with.

I'm American, and most of probably know we have an extensive military legacy despite our relatively brief existence. I managed to narrow the field down to two, but couldn't decide between them, so I'll list them both. One isn't complete without the other anyway.



These guys saved the US in its darkest hour, and that puts them a cut above the rest for me. Now I want to see who you guys come up with, especially the non-Americans here.
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Posted 9/16/17 , edited 9/16/17


I have a soft spot for Erwin Rommel. I also tend to agree with your two choices above OP.
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22 / M / England
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Posted 9/16/17 , edited 9/16/17

Dark_Alma wrote:
I have a soft spot for Erwin Rommel.

A very interesting man indeed

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Posted 9/16/17 , edited 9/16/17

Yggdron wrote:


Dark_Alma wrote:
I have a soft spot for Erwin Rommel.

A very interesting man indeed



Yep, and if you look farther into this, you will see he had a distaste for the Waffen SS and his company never committed even a single war crime. Not many Generals worldwide can say that as far as I am aware.
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Posted 9/16/17 , edited 9/16/17
Here's a book review on Sherman, who is described by the book reviewer as "a racist, philandering, psychotic, mass-murdering war criminal."

http://www.theamericanconservative.com/articles/the-hell-general-sherman-made/

One choice quote:


[R]eaders coming fresh from the burning schoolhouses and raped housewives of the Georgia campaign won’t be surprised to learn about attacks on peaceful winter villages of women and children and elderly. This is the worst pattern of Sherman’s professional life, the pattern buried in his Memoirs and resisted by so many of his biographers: when given military power over civilians, he used it despotically, with a ruthless bloodlust shared by almost none of his contemporaries.

It was an attitude that went hand-in-hand with a brace of snarling bigotries. He affected admiration of the bravery of tribes like the Navajo or Arapaho but considered them subhuman, writing and saying often that the cleaner solution to the problem of “civilizing” such savages might be to wipe them out entirely. Likewise his contempt for blacks—“A nigger as such is a most excellent fellow, but he is not fit to marry, to associate, or vote with me, or mine”—which he showed not only during the war, when he fought vigorously against the Union’s creating units of black soldiers, but also after it, when he fought just as vigorously against any kind of civil rights for the Union’s newest citizens.


On the other hand, my impression of Grant is positive, and there's a fairly revisionist portrayal of him in the recent American Ulysses that uses newly unearthed primary texts, such as Grant's personal letters, to give a sense of his rich, intellectual curiosity and how it suited him for the presidency. The book is on my reading list.
Posted 9/16/17 , edited 9/17/17
Idek
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Posted 9/16/17 , edited 9/17/17
I'd say General Grant was one of our best military men, but I think George Washington was also a great leader.
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Posted 9/16/17 , edited 9/17/17
Grant / Eisenhower.
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Posted 9/16/17 , edited 9/17/17

calebjohnson1854 wrote:

I'd say General Grant was one of our best military men, but I think George Washington was also a great leader.


Yeah, only Washington could have kept the Continental Army going, I can't think of anyone else who had the courage, charisma, endurance and thick skin necessary.
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Posted 9/16/17 , edited 9/17/17
He was also an all-around ideal statesman in the Roman tradition, which is something that has been sorely lost in the 21st century.
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33 / M / Alhambra, CA
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Posted 9/16/17 , edited 9/17/17
On which part of history?

Without being politically correct, some of the greatest military leaders that I could think of are the following.

General Nathan Bedford Forrest - Confederate Army
Captain Charles Butler McVay III - USS Indianapolis
Corporal Desmond Thomas Doss - US Army Combat Medic
Major William D. Swenson - US Army

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24 / M / Idaho, USA
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Posted 9/16/17 , edited 9/17/17
Duke Nukem
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Posted 9/16/17 , edited 9/17/17


Patton was a showboat and a glory hound

Bradiey was the better leader
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Omar_Bradley
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22 / M / Canada
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Posted 9/16/17 , edited 9/17/17
The OP wants us to talk about who we think is the single best military leader in our countries history. You know what though? the best military leaders in Canadian history rarely ever get any credit. So I'm gonna bend the rules and talk about two of them. Fight me.

General Arthur Currie

Probably THE best general in Canadian history. Currie was commander of the Canadian Corps in the First World World War after the previous Commander, Julian Byng, had been promoted. During his tenure, Currie turned the Canadian Corps into an accomplished fighting force (more so than it already was anyway). His study of the French battle at Verdun lead him to reform the corps away from the usual trench warfare model into an army that focused on reconnaissance, platoon tactics, careful staff-work and preparation, and coordinating unprecedented amounts of artillery for counter-battery and infantry support.

He gained a reputation as a master of set-piece battles and as one of the most capable commanders on the Western front, a title he earned through achieving impressive victories during the Allies' Hundred Days Offensive at the end of the war. All this is made more impressive by the fact that he never had a formal education in a military school. He joined the militia as a bankrupt real-estate speculator and learned everything he knew through war-time experience and through his own meticulous nature.

Rear-Admiral Leonard W. Murray

This guy doesn't get as much credit as he deserves, quite frankly. Murray was the commander of the North-Atlantic Theater during the Second World War, and was responsible for the crucial task of protecting allied shipping across the ocean from the German u-boat wolf packs. His job wasn't all that glamorous or filled with glorious victories against the enemy, as he spent almost all of his time behind a desk, but he had the difficult task of taking a small navy of inexperienced sailors and using them to protect US and Canadian convoys as they made their journey to the UK.

Over the course of the war he oversaw the implementation of the successful "small ship anti-submarine" strategy, built up the Canadian navy to 332 vessels and lead the overall administration and coordination of all allied air and naval forces in the North Atlantic. Considering we never hear stories of u-boats constantly crippling allied shipping I'd say he did a pretty good job. Unfortunately his career came to an end when he was scapegoated by the government for being "responsible" for the Halifax riots by Canadian sailors on VE day and was promptly hung out to dry.
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