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Post Reply How does wireless adapter works?
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Posted 10/8/17 , edited 10/8/17
Assuming our computer connects through wireless. Up to a certain amount of computers could share the same wireless network, for instance, mynetwork. But if it's just one signal from one set of antenna from the wireless adapter. How come each computer can do different tasks? Like one person could be messaging, while the other guy could be browsing on the Facebook on the same network, with one signal, how does that work?
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Posted 10/8/17 , edited 10/8/17
What are you talking about?
The signal connects to the exchange near your home. This has nothing to do with what you do.
Are you implying that if you message a guy in China, the signal goes to China?
The signal goes to the exchange and from there it runs through cables wherever it has to go.
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Posted 10/8/17 , edited 10/8/17
Simple answer: TCP/IP protocol.

Each computer connecting wirelessly is assigned an IP address and information requested by that computer is sent back to that particular IP address. You are limited in the number of computers through the amount of bandwidth available to share, the number of IP addresses you make available through your wireless adapter and the memory/processing capacity of your wireless adapter to handle multiple simultaneous requests.
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Posted 10/8/17 , edited 10/10/17
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Posted 10/8/17 , edited 10/8/17

MidoriNoTora wrote:

Simple answer: TCP/IP protocol.

Each computer connecting wirelessly is assigned an IP address and information requested by that computer is sent back to that particular IP address. You are limited in the number of computers through the amount of bandwidth available to share, the number of IP addresses you make available through your wireless adapter and the memory/processing capacity of your wireless adapter to handle multiple simultaneous requests.


That I get, but the adapter is emanating just one signal right? If you need to process 2 different IPS for 2 different computers you will need 2 different signals from the same wireless adapter? The wireless adapter sends out a square wave to communicate with the wireless card.


AddMates wrote:

Wireless adapters are electronic devices that allow computers to connect to the Internet and to other computers without using wires. They send data via radio waves to routers that pass it on to broadband modems or internal networks. Most laptops and tablet computers have built-in wireless adapters, but you often have to install them on desktop computers. Before adding them to office desktops and establishing a wireless network in your office, the kind of adapter you get must match your needs.


Right but the wireless adapter sends out one (the same) radio wave for both receiving computers. So if one of the computer is looking at a cat video, while the other computer is looking at a dog video. You'll need two radio waves in this case?
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Posted 10/8/17 , edited 10/8/17
As Midori explained, each client on the network is assigned a network address, so the router knows who it's talking to (and conversely, each device knows when the router is talking to it). The router takes turns talking to each connected device, so the network's overall bandwidth is split between them.

Imagine you're talking to multiple people at the same time and you say the person's name before each sentence directed at them. Since you can only speak 100 words per minute though, it means they have to share that 100 limit between them. Both people can "hear" everything that's being said, but because you're saying their name each time, they know when to pay attention.
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Posted 10/8/17 , edited 10/8/17

iriomote wrote:

As Midori explained, each client on the network is assigned a network address, so the router knows who it's talking to (and conversely, each device knows when the router is talking to it). The router takes turns talking to each connected device, so the network's overall bandwidth is split between them.

Imagine you're talking to multiple people at the same time and you say the person's name before each sentence directed at them. Since you can only speak 100 words per minute though, it means they have to share that 100 limit between them. Both people can "hear" everything that's being said, but because you're saying their name each time, they know when to pay attention.


I see, that explains sharing the bandwidth, since you can't talk to both at the same time. And the IP address, very cool
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Posted 10/8/17 , edited 10/8/17
Wireless adapters work exactly like wired adapters, but by whispering sweet nothings into the ethereal mindspace.
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Posted 10/8/17 , edited 10/8/17

gornotck wrote:

Wireless adapters work exactly like wired adapters, but by whispering sweet nothings into the ethereal mindspace.


Right, theoretically, I am trying to communicate with a nanomachine wirelessly, so I turn to look on the MRI, having a powerful magnetic field to flip the pole of the water molecule. Then assign an IP address to each nanomachine and program them to move to the correct spot to modify DNA

P.S Keeping an IP address needs a memory space and having a magnetic field could wipe out the memory , oh well it's not like I can get the details to work

P.S Listed here in Wikipedia about nano radio compliations https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nanoradio

P.S I mean if MRI works why can't they just use that to communicate with the nanomachine?
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Posted 10/8/17 , edited 10/8/17

fredreload wrote:

Right, theoretically, I am trying to communicate with a nanomachine wirelessly, so I turn to look on the MRI, having a powerful magnetic field to flip the pole of the water molecule. Then assign an IP address to each nanomachine and program them to move to the correct spot to modify DNA

You're trying to come up with a theoretical nanomachine for modifying DNA? Nature basically has that already: "CRISPR/Cas9." There have already been experiments in tricking it to make the modifications we want to DNA for us.

It's fascinating research, but biology is one of my weaker subjects, so I'm afraid there's little I could tell you about it.
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Posted 10/9/17 , edited 10/9/17

iriomote wrote:


fredreload wrote:

Right, theoretically, I am trying to communicate with a nanomachine wirelessly, so I turn to look on the MRI, having a powerful magnetic field to flip the pole of the water molecule. Then assign an IP address to each nanomachine and program them to move to the correct spot to modify DNA

You're trying to come up with a theoretical nanomachine for modifying DNA? Nature basically has that already: "CRISPR/Cas9." There have already been experiments in tricking it to make the modifications we want to DNA for us.

It's fascinating research, but biology is one of my weaker subjects, so I'm afraid there's little I could tell you about it.


I too have looked into Crispr, but no matter how you modify it, it's precision is not 100%. On the contrary for a man made nanomachine. Its precision is always 100%. I too have thought about, why building a nanomachine if we already have efficient enzymes? But having a wireless machine at that scale can work wonders :D, if grey goo does not happen
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Posted 10/9/17 , edited 10/9/17
Why would you want to communicate to the nano machines? Wouldn't it make more sense to program them ahead of time and have them target specific things and after say 24hrs their batteries run out and they get metabolized? If your looking to modify DNA it seems like you could simply program the nano machines to look for specific sequences or enzymes and have a reprogrammed response ready. I would rather have the MRI destroy them (to be used as a safeguard in case of malfunction). Wireless signals can be hacked so it would be dangerous to use on anything important or alive. I suppose you could use Zigbee(would also work better on nano battery life) since I don't think anyone has hacked it.... but still anything done remotely leaves the system vulnerable
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Posted 10/9/17 , edited 10/9/17

DevinKuska wrote:

Why would you want to communicate to the nano machines? Wouldn't it make more sense to program them ahead of time and have them target specific things and after say 24hrs their batteries run out and they get metabolized? If your looking to modify DNA it seems like you could simply program the nano machines to look for specific sequences or enzymes and have a reprogrammed response ready. I would rather have the MRI destroy them (to be used as a safeguard in case of malfunction). Wireless signals can be hacked so it would be dangerous to use on anything important or alive. I suppose you could use Zigbee(would also work better on nano battery life) since I don't think anyone has hacked it.... but still anything done remotely leaves the system vulnerable


If you can communicate with it, you can program it to do different things, let's say I want to turn into a cat today, or a dog the next day, I can do it with the same set of nanomachines, but with different instructions.

If you want the nanomahine preprogrammed to do the tasks, well it would be similar to the crispr method. One thing is this nanomachine would have its own visualization software installed and an operating system. Which I believe is the coolest thing ever, I mean logging on to the operating system on a nanomachine. But then you would need to have this visualization software installed in every single nanomachine, and that would take quite some space. Instead, you could have the visualization software installed in a central computer, and just send in the wireless signal to the nanomachine tell it to move left, or right. This is, assuming you have the entire human body visualized on the molecular scale in 3D, which I am yet to find aside from an electron microscope.

Originally my thought was that, well, if you want to cut the DNA you better have it wirelessly controlling the nanomachine when to make the cut, like a switch that activates it. Now it seems you can also cut the DNA with light, just visualize the whole body in molecular scale and cut it with light. Whichever works.

Still, I think having an operating system on every single nanomachine is the coolest idea ever. It'll probably start out with multiple machines on a normal human size controlled by one computer, then we work our way toward smaller machines or nanomachines.

P.S And with wireless you can wirelessly recharge the battery
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Posted 10/9/17 , edited 10/9/17
Magic
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Posted 10/9/17 , edited 10/9/17

zendude wrote:

Magic


To be honest it really is, but think about it, if we are to create a computer back 20~25 years ago with the present day technology, we could shrink it down to quite a small size. And in the future we'll have computer built out of subatomic particles. It is easier to say then to get the thing working. 20/30 of Fred's tech never made it to the Google's webpage, or that they showed up back in 2010~2012. In the end we wait for the next publicly available item. What drives these inventions could be in terms of practicality. The University of Michigan is currently building and shrinking down the size of a computer with various sensor to centimeter size. Is it close to a nanomachine? Sort of, but you need to make it moves and travels. People are experimenting piloting many similar machines with a single computer. Self driving car and object avoidance. 3D spectroscopy. Will someone combine all these into a single package? Ya it could take a while, as far as I can see. If you are with the dream group though it could be a different story. I'm counting on the dream group because I don't actually see them. But I suspect they got many of Fred's tech in their sleeves. Will I ever get to see them? It is hard to say
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