First  Prev  1  2  Next  Last
Post Reply It shouldn't have to be a chore, it should be fun and exciting.
50023 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
27 / F / New Jersey, USA
Offline
Posted 11/6/17 , edited 11/6/17
For a while, writing has been a chore for me mainly because I was rushing to find that spark in my stories. I could never stick to one plot because I always find myself leaning towards others. I have a bunch of character but no story to put them in. Writing is starting to stress me out and it's not fun anymore. I want to have fun with writing and enjoy it. I've forgotten how to enjoy writing and not focus on the little things that will stress me out.


What should I do to keep myself entertained with writing?
2181 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
ᴀᴅʀɪғᴛ
Offline
Posted 11/6/17 , edited 11/6/17
I have identified myself as a musician since I first picked up a guitar. However for so long it felt so dishonest to claim that outwardly. It takes an honest conversation with yourself to set your intent, with whatever you do, and then to go forth and become it. My story shared below is of my experiences.. I hope they help <3

Struggling to find my identity

For almost a decade prior. I felt exactly as you did: That the acts of practice and noodling was more of a chore than moments to be cherished. I needed a lexical break - Creatively, I was all walls and blocks. It felt more of a maze than a mansion. I was uninspired and was not experiencing new roads down my musical path. Thus, I would only take the guitar down once in awhile during my college years, where growing up it was hard to pry it out of my hands.

The theme fit into my overarching explorations into digital-centric music making (utilizing electronics to aid in the creation of music - NOT a music producer.. ha ha, semantics? Hell with it Production is such a gross term for creating art.).

I felt at times useless or insignificant as an actual musician, but my strengths in making things, computers, and social pursuits led me to creating an ever-evolving studio and workspace that dwarfed my perceived talent. I had the power of 1,000 Abbey Roads recording studios in my main rig alone, running near-unlimited VST and computer power to do whatever I wanted. No limits.

No limits turned out to be my waterloo. I am a human being. I do not know what no limits means or cannot conceptualize how to be creative given no limits. It is said we are creatures who blossom when faced with challenges, and limits are challenges. Creativity happens, anecdotally, when I am given obstacles to overcome.

Mix my struggles with raw musical identity and ability this in with an increasingly refined taste for what good music to me sounds like, and there was a very real situation where I could have simply ceased to exist as that identity altogether.

yet . . .

After an almost decade-long hiatus I am blossoming with a rekindled passion for music. my latest project!

So - how did this refound passion come about?

It took a bon iver - quite literally, a good winter, specifically the last winter, where I dived into more the electronics/DIY aspect of making eurorack synthesis modules, which spilled over into making and modding guitar effects pedals. view some of my recent module creations here

This led me to my current path as an assembler and maker of teensy/arduino based effects and modules. I am reinvigorated and am putting my best work out yet - and it is mostly thanks to my explorations down a tertiary, albeit important & fascinating (if a geek! ha) field, of a music-electronics maker.

Yet I would be not telling it true if a lot of what happened to re-spark my music could be attributed to this one new arena. The little times where I lived honestly, away from my dreaded bedroom priso- err, studio, and into the world, are coming out to be the big influencers in my work. In many ways, your own ego is your rival. How honest or contrived you shall be depends on who is the stronger combatant.

Speaking of Bon Iver, I had little respect for the man until I started listening to his works. I stumbled upon a statement he once made in an interview, ironically in a thread created solely to bash the guy.
They resonated so strongly upon first gaze, and still ring true every recount. He said:

" A lot of the music making process happens outside of the studio. "



Give it a shot Bullet-points to address the core question:

- SET YOUR INTENT! A lot of the intent process begins with identifying where you are and what directions you wish to travel along your journey. It is important to set your intent with yourself above all else - why have I faced the direction that I have set my gaze on?

- Do not force creativity. Our natural cycles do not align with our contrived human calenders. That is on a meta-physical scale. Biology, mental state, etc. Do not force it. Your work will show strain.

- Don't be afraid to take a hiatus. Everyone need a break. We are creatures whose spice of life is variation.

- Limit yourself. Take a lesson from calculus and why math geeks obsess, and often find unimaginable truth, in observing and working with limits. More practically as a creative, set your course of action to encounter obstacles rather than create in a sandbox free from limits. Dig deep on this one, because the applications of self limitation is VERY personal. Very deep and hard to teach, gather knowledge of best practices or new ideas. Remember the goal is, ultimately, to blossom, not sabotage yourself from doing so.

- Jump into a complementary area around your creative medium . What else interests you in this life? Do you like working with your hands? Are you interested in how logical (computational, assembly) systems work? Do you enjoy setting vibes/aesthetics/image? Are you a social savant? Music gear maker. Electronics coder (software for creatives). Visualization & events specialist. Marketer/A&R agent. Weave in your life to your passion and it will blossom.

- Recognize infancy comes first I am a stalwart believer that we are our own worst critic simply due to one fact: Our tastes will always be more refined than our skills. We know what good is, and know that when starting out, that our products of our passion are not that. THIS IS SO CRUCIAL TO RECOGNIZE AND RECONCILE WITH. Do NOT skip this topic when having that honest conversation with yourself.

Allow yourself to be an infant. It's OK that you start out with a disparate dependence on external input and guidance and that you are helpless with so many of the nuances and aspects of your creative craft.

If you allow yourself that, you open yourself up to the opportunity to savor the journey - which will be rife with improvement and inspiration that you would -NEVER- believe, or can even think of, at the journey's onset. Allow yourself to go.

- never give up the process of learning about yourself, above all.

You are more than a writer, just as you are more than a sentient consciousness piloting a dumb meat puppet. In reality, we are a supercolony of billions, if not more, organisms all vying for control. All vying for power. Our brain may be the most dominant conscious force, but all of us - from the flora of gut bacteria bros to our mitocondria (which, fun fact - was once an invading organism that pushed out the then-reigning cellular power plant organelle)... we all go.

Being mindful of how your life and your creative rhythm oscillate with and intersect with each other is the key to unlocking true syncopation in your creative endeavours to what you experience.

That, to me, is the most honest way to approach the creative process.

<3 <3
6091 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
F / BuBbLeS!
Offline
Posted 11/6/17 , edited 11/6/17
when it comes to writing, it should always be fun, rather it be for a project, school or profession. when this happens to me, I tend to take a short break and do something else. such as reading, sewing, streaming, etc. things will start flowing again, just be patient and let the fluid flow. and don't be afraid to let your mind wonder. also, there's always the option of writing a story a few times and see which idea you like more. even Stephen King has mentioned to read and read often. not to steal the ideas but to trigger what could be lurking up there. hope this helps some and best of luck.
50023 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
27 / F / New Jersey, USA
Offline
Posted 11/6/17 , edited 11/7/17



Thank you both.
38290 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
32 / M
Offline
Posted 11/7/17 , edited 11/7/17
Perhaps write some short stories rather than trying to commit to a single novel. Or you could try writing something episodic, where you have a couple core characters or a loose theme, but you're free to experiment with different ideas for stories and characters in every "chapter."

That might keep you from getting bored of a single story idea or bogged down in, "little things." One of those stories could even end up growing into a novel naturally without you having to force it.

It sounds like you decided at some point in your head that you're going to write a novel, but your heart wasn't in it. You (presumably) don't have a publisher breathing down your neck with a deadline though, so you can afford to write at your own pace.
50023 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
27 / F / New Jersey, USA
Offline
Posted 11/7/17 , edited 11/7/17

iriomote wrote:

Perhaps write some short stories rather than trying to commit to a single novel. Or you could try writing something episodic, where you have a couple core characters or a loose theme, but you're free to experiment with different ideas for stories and characters in every "chapter."

That might keep you from getting bored of a single story idea or bogged down in, "little things." One of those stories could even end up growing into a novel naturally without you having to force it.

It sounds like you decided at some point in your head that you're going to write a novel, but your heart wasn't in it. You (presumably) don't have a publisher breathing down your neck with a deadline though, so you can afford to write at your own pace.


People mention that to me a lot that I should write a short story. But it gets so hard because I only know how to make plots for novels or work on a novel. So I steer clear away from short stories. But now I am going to have to write a short story because I am getting nowhere with a novel. I am trying too hard to write a novel when I should just write a story. I don't know about an episodic story because that seems like a challenge that I barely understand. Creative Writing is my hobby and I really miss the enjoyment of it. I'll write a novel but for now, I will focus or at least try to focus on a short story. It's been a very long time since I've written a short story and I wonder if I can even do it.

16436 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
26 / M
Offline
Posted 11/7/17 , edited 11/8/17

qualeshia3 wrote:


iriomote wrote:

Perhaps write some short stories rather than trying to commit to a single novel. Or you could try writing something episodic, where you have a couple core characters or a loose theme, but you're free to experiment with different ideas for stories and characters in every "chapter."

That might keep you from getting bored of a single story idea or bogged down in, "little things." One of those stories could even end up growing into a novel naturally without you having to force it.

It sounds like you decided at some point in your head that you're going to write a novel, but your heart wasn't in it. You (presumably) don't have a publisher breathing down your neck with a deadline though, so you can afford to write at your own pace.


People mention that to me a lot that I should write a short story. But it gets so hard because I only know how to make plots for novels or work on a novel. So I steer clear away from short stories. But now I am going to have to write a short story because I am getting nowhere with a novel. I am trying too hard to write a novel when I should just write a story. I don't know about an episodic story because that seems like a challenge that I barely understand. Creative Writing is my hobby and I really miss the enjoyment of it. I'll write a novel but for now, I will focus or at least try to focus on a short story. It's been a very long time since I've written a short story and I wonder if I can even do it.



I usually don't try to focus on length. I just write and it turns as out as long as it needs to be. My first story started out pretty short at about 21k words, but I didn't feel like the story is done and now that it's finished, its around 80k. Generally how I write is I start with my basic premise, then I come up with an ending (which I try to make subvert some expectations) and then I fill in the bridge between them as I go.

That said, I think that you have a tendency of aiming for really huge projects and I do think that is incredibly difficult. Perhaps instead of thinking about it as a "short story" think of it as a "small story". Instead of focusing on length, just try to write a story which focuses on only a few characters and only a few settings. Make your conflict something small and personal instead of intergalactic.

Currently, I'm writing a short story, or a collection of short stories. I've decided to start with a train mystery. My characters show up on a train and someone dies. Who dun it? My "subversive" ending is that everyone did it. I've been working for a while on writing the bridge between them. I've got two main characters, two big side characters, some background characters and one setting.

Everything is small but who knows, when you get going, maybe you find yourself curious to learn more and your 7k word story may turn into a 100k word story.
50023 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
27 / F / New Jersey, USA
Offline
Posted 11/7/17 , edited 11/8/17

sundin13 wrote:

I usually don't try to focus on length. I just write and it turns as out as long as it needs to be. My first story started out pretty short at about 21k words, but I didn't feel like the story is done and now that it's finished, its around 80k. Generally how I write is I start with my basic premise, then I come up with an ending (which I try to make subvert some expectations) and then I fill in the bridge between them as I go.

That said, I think that you have a tendency of aiming for really huge projects and I do think that is incredibly difficult. Perhaps instead of thinking about it as a "short story" think of it as a "small story". Instead of focusing on length, just try to write a story which focuses on only a few characters and only a few settings. Make your conflict something small and personal instead of intergalactic.

Currently, I'm writing a short story, or a collection of short stories. I've decided to start with a train mystery. My characters show up on a train and someone dies. Who dun it? My "subversive" ending is that everyone did it. I've been working for a while on writing the bridge between them. I've got two main characters, two big side characters, some background characters and one setting.

Everything is small but who knows, when you get going, maybe you find yourself curious to learn more and your 7k word story may turn into a 100k word story.



Yeah, I have a huge problem with taking on a big task. I really need to slow down and stop it.
1555 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
46 / M / Corpus Christi, T...
Offline
Posted 11/9/17 , edited 11/9/17
I've been writing as a hobby off and on for a long time, fiction for about ten years or so. What has helped me a great deal is finding communities of like-minded people and sharing creative energy with them. For me, that place was the Literature community on deviantart.com, but there are other (and probably better) places where writer-types congregate.

I just stick with DA because I've made friends there and now I'm old and a creature of habit. :)

Otherwise, I've mainly written short stories, even had a few published, and these have ranged from a few thousand words to very short flash fiction (no more than 500 words a pop). Right now I'm giving National Novel Writing Month a go. I don't expect I'll finish the novel, but that's not really the point; I'm mainly trying to jump-start myself out of a dry spell.

I think in your case, the advice others have given you about short stories would help a great deal. It would help you try out the various plotlines you've got in your head until you can finally rest on one, and then give that one all you've got. Or, maybe you can combine several into something longer.
16436 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
26 / M
Offline
Posted 11/10/17 , edited 11/11/17

memnalar wrote:
Otherwise, I've mainly written short stories, even had a few published, and these have ranged from a few thousand words to very short flash fiction (no more than 500 words a pop). Right now I'm giving National Novel Writing Month a go. I don't expect I'll finish the novel, but that's not really the point; I'm mainly trying to jump-start myself out of a dry spell.


Out of curiosity, what do you do with short stories? Like, are they published in compilations with other authors or are they sold as stand-alone products? I've just started a project which I don't expect will be particularly long and I'm not really sure what to do with it when I finish.
1555 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
46 / M / Corpus Christi, T...
Offline
Posted 11/10/17 , edited 11/11/17

sundin13 wrote:


memnalar wrote:
Otherwise, I've mainly written short stories, even had a few published, and these have ranged from a few thousand words to very short flash fiction (no more than 500 words a pop). Right now I'm giving National Novel Writing Month a go. I don't expect I'll finish the novel, but that's not really the point; I'm mainly trying to jump-start myself out of a dry spell.


Out of curiosity, what do you do with short stories? Like, are they published in compilations with other authors or are they sold as stand-alone products? I've just started a project which I don't expect will be particularly long and I'm not really sure what to do with it when I finish.


Both. You can sell them to editors collecting them for periodicals and magazines, or as part of short-story anthologies and the like.

Most recently, I've sold a few of mine to a friend who publishes themed anthologies through her small-press company. The themes range from stuff like steampunk, monsters, and other things. The outfit is called JayHenge Publishing if you're interested: http://www.jayhenge.com/callforstories.html

Otherwise, I usually recommend an account on Duotrope to anyone who is really serious about getting their stuff into the marketplace. You can set up a free trial account, track where you've submitted, search by genre and market, etc. I don't have my act in gear to the point where I have an account there myself, but I know people who have seen good returns. https://duotrope.com/
50023 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
27 / F / New Jersey, USA
Offline
Posted 11/17/17 , edited 11/17/17

memnalar wrote:

I've been writing as a hobby off and on for a long time, fiction for about ten years or so. What has helped me a great deal is finding communities of like-minded people and sharing creative energy with them. For me, that place was the Literature community on deviantart.com, but there are other (and probably better) places where writer-types congregate.

I just stick with DA because I've made friends there and now I'm old and a creature of habit. :)

Otherwise, I've mainly written short stories, even had a few published, and these have ranged from a few thousand words to very short flash fiction (no more than 500 words a pop). Right now I'm giving National Novel Writing Month a go. I don't expect I'll finish the novel, but that's not really the point; I'm mainly trying to jump-start myself out of a dry spell.

I think in your case, the advice others have given you about short stories would help a great deal. It would help you try out the various plotlines you've got in your head until you can finally rest on one, and then give that one all you've got. Or, maybe you can combine several into something longer.


I'm on two sites called Wattpad and Fictionpress. I'll stick with those two for the time being.

Yeah, I really think I need to tackle something small and easy rather than something hard and long.
1555 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
46 / M / Corpus Christi, T...
Offline
Posted 11/18/17 , edited 11/18/17

qualeshia3 wrote:


memnalar wrote:

I've been writing as a hobby off and on for a long time, fiction for about ten years or so. What has helped me a great deal is finding communities of like-minded people and sharing creative energy with them. For me, that place was the Literature community on deviantart.com, but there are other (and probably better) places where writer-types congregate.

I just stick with DA because I've made friends there and now I'm old and a creature of habit. :)

Otherwise, I've mainly written short stories, even had a few published, and these have ranged from a few thousand words to very short flash fiction (no more than 500 words a pop). Right now I'm giving National Novel Writing Month a go. I don't expect I'll finish the novel, but that's not really the point; I'm mainly trying to jump-start myself out of a dry spell.

I think in your case, the advice others have given you about short stories would help a great deal. It would help you try out the various plotlines you've got in your head until you can finally rest on one, and then give that one all you've got. Or, maybe you can combine several into something longer.


I'm on two sites called Wattpad and Fictionpress. I'll stick with those two for the time being.

Yeah, I really think I need to tackle something small and easy rather than something hard and long.


What are those two sites like? Would you recommend one over the other?

What kind of stories do you usually write? Or novels, I should say?
50023 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
27 / F / New Jersey, USA
Offline
Posted 11/18/17 , edited 11/18/17


The sites are both good in their own way. I would try Fictionpress although I use Wattpad more.

I tend to write fantasy or try to write fantasy and science fiction.
1364 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
28 / M / New Jersey
Online
Posted 12/14/17 , edited 12/15/17
I agree it should be fun but it should also be a little bit of a chore as well. While most of what I write comes to me naturally there are a lot of elements that I have to spend hours, sometimes days looking into before I can put the pen to paper. My characters have a lot of backstory that inspire them to act the way they do and I like to think that all their actions can be explained by things that have happened in the past or are a direct result of what is going on in their mind at the time.

The most important example of which is the love story during my two main characters. Under normal circumstances in any other worlds society, the two of them would never end up together no matter what happened. I had to look deep into the psyches of two people and add in ten years of little events and happenings that slowly made them want to break all the rules to realize how even though they are not meant to be together, that without one the other could not survive.

Sadly I've been a bit corrupted in the fact that nowadays I want everything I write to have reasoning behind it so that the reader fully understands where everyone is coming from and why they are so dedicated at fulfilling their goals even if it means destroying themselves in the process.
First  Prev  1  2  Next  Last
You must be logged in to post.