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Harvey Weinstein had ex-mossad agents and private investigators to suppress allegations against him
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Posted 11/7/17 , edited 11/7/17
This seems like it's straight out of a spy movie.Harvey Weinstein hired ex mossad agents (Israel intelligence agency) and private investigators to go undercover and track and collect information on actresses that he sexually assaulted.


https://www.newyorker.com/news/news-desk/harvey-weinsteins-army-of-spies

(Article is pretty long)

Thoughts?
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Posted 11/7/17 , edited 11/7/17
This isn't very surprising, to me.
Organizations like "Black Cube" have been around for quite a while.
Someone as powerful as Harvey Weinstein, financially speaking, can utilize agencies like Black Cube similar to private investigators.
Black Cube is a bit on the far end of these organizations; as they closely focus on intelligence and information analysis more so than throwing muscle and firearms into the mix.
With that being said, there are numerous organizations that are on the opposite end of that spectrum which are considered legal businesses.
They are highly trained for combat (ex-military; allowing for expertise in both physical attacks and firearms) and are often used as personal bodyguards outside of "traditional channels".

When one is paranoid of losing the power they hold over their reality they are prone to resorting to the most extreme measures possible.
Weinstein is just one of few that would actually fall on the extreme side of that statement.
These women coming forward would mean career death for him (so far, this is mostly being proven) and he didn't want to risk them coming out into the light with their stories (especially after paying them quite a bit not to come forward).

To me, it's more surprising that people view this as something that doesn't happen or couldn't happen.
"Black Cube" is just on the high-end of the market for this kind of work.
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Posted 11/7/17 , edited 11/7/17
like the cult Scientology, they blackmail and gather dirt on their followers so they will follow blindly and not step out of line, the sicko Weinstein did the same thing by hiring an extremist group so he can keep his victims in line. hollywood is toxic and now people can finally see how toxic it really is, and, from what I can tell, there are more and more cases against Weinstein alone, so, at least the first victim set the stage and more should step forth and not be afraid. villains don't have the right to shame and/or scare victims.
qwueri 
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Posted 11/7/17 , edited 11/7/17
So the dude's even more of a creep than initially thought.
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Posted 11/7/17 , edited 11/8/17

Cydoemus wrote:

This isn't very surprising, to me.
Organizations like "Black Cube" have been around for quite a while.
Someone as powerful as Harvey Weinstein, financially speaking, can utilize agencies like Black Cube similar to private investigators.
Black Cube is a bit on the far end of these organizations; as they closely focus on intelligence and information analysis more so than throwing muscle and firearms into the mix.
With that being said, there are numerous organizations that are on the opposite end of that spectrum which are considered legal businesses.
They are highly trained for combat (ex-military; allowing for expertise in both physical attacks and firearms) and are often used as personal bodyguards outside of "traditional channels".

When one is paranoid of losing the power they hold over their reality they are prone to resorting to the most extreme measures possible.
Weinstein is just one of few that would actually fall on the extreme side of that statement.
These women coming forward would mean career death for him (so far, this is mostly being proven) and he didn't want to risk them coming out into the light with their stories (especially after paying them quite a bit not to come forward).

To me, it's more surprising that people view this as something that doesn't happen or couldn't happen.
"Black Cube" is just on the high-end of the market for this kind of work.


A lot of people not just on here, are missing the bigger implications, which is that this case shows that foreign agents are able to openly operate at a mafia-like level and gangstalk/possibly blackmail civilians and journalists. It's easy to just shrug this off as something that happens in a rich-man's world, but to act like this was common knowledge (not specifically referring to you) would be a bit disingenuous, as it's pretty clear that this is something that would have been considered tinfoil-hattery if it were brought up in the past. It's not something that really crosses someone's mind until it actually happens to them.

It's clearly a matter of national security, and deserves more attention in the future whether more serious measures should be taken as civilians and journalists don't have the resources to defend themselves. Having journalists silenced all across the country would be a bit of a problem, don't you think? Journalists put their lives on the line to get stuff like this out. In fact I'm surprised this isn't a legitimate argument for gun ownership, in a world where highly skilled foreign intelligence agents are able to stalk and in the worst case even murder. That recently happened to the journalist who leaked the Panama Papers, who was killed with a bomb planted in her car.
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Posted 11/7/17 , edited 11/8/17

redwine2 wrote:

A lot of people not just on here, are missing the bigger implications, which is that this case shows that foreign agents are able to openly operate at a mafia-like level and gangstalk/possibly blackmail civilians and journalists. It's easy to just shrug this off as something that happens in a rich-man's world, but to act like this was common knowledge (not specifically referring to you) would be a bit disingenuous, as it's pretty clear that this is something that would have been considered tinfoil-hattery if it were brought up in the past. It's not something that really crosses someone's mind until it actually happens to them.

It's clearly a matter of national security, and deserves more attention in the future whether more serious measures should be taken as civilians and journalists don't have the resources to defend themselves. Having journalists silenced all across the country would be a bit of a problem, don't you think? Journalists put their lives on the line to get stuff like this out. In fact I'm surprised this isn't a legitimate argument for gun ownership, in a world where highly skilled foreign intelligence agents are able to stalk and in the worst case even murder. That recently happened to the journalist who leaked the Panama Papers, who was killed with a bomb planted in her car.


Something you and some of the other people on the CR forum don't seem have quite wrapped your head around is the difference between government agents and private citizens who used to work with a government. The thing is, once these people leaver their governments' employment, they're essentially their own man, albeit presumably within certain restrictions like following their country's laws and not divulging classified info they might be privy to. There's nothing inherently wrong with such people hiring themselves out to work internationally. Like that ex-spy that sold the Trump dossier. Once he left the MI6 or where ever he was working, there wasn't any reason he could do work for American citizens. It would be one thing if Harvey Winston was engaged in secret negotiations with Mossad or whoever, trading favors that would allow a foreign government to underhandedly influence US policy. That's the kind of thing that would get written off as a tin-foil conspiracy unless there's evidence. But there's nothing wrong, or even particularly unusual with hiring someone who happened to have previous employment with another government. That's just capitalism at work.

Not that I'm saying what Winston was doing was good, obviously; it was kind of creepy of him tbh. But you're getting upset for the wrong reasons.
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Posted 11/7/17 , edited 11/8/17

Mishio1 wrote:

Something you and some of the other people on the CR forum don't seem have quite wrapped your head around is the difference between government agents and private citizens who used to work with a government. The thing is, once these people leaver their governments' employment, they're essentially their own man, albeit presumably within certain restrictions like following their country's laws and not divulging classified info they might be privy to. There's nothing inherently wrong with such people hiring themselves out to work internationally.


It tells me a lot when you start off presuming that I'm unable to distinguish between current and former employee status. The reason I didn't add the word "former" at the start of "foreign agent" was actually because I believed it was redundant, as this is one big spy network where people can exchange information. If you think that I misread the article as current Mossad agents working odd-jobs for Harvey Weinstein, it's understandable why you might consider right-wingers brain-damaged enough to not distinguish past and present. You have a distorted perception of them.

You also seem to be perfectly fine with former intelligence agents from foreign countries operating spy businesses in the United States as long as they abide by the law. It's almost as though you forgot that this thread is about former spies from a foreign country gangstalking victims and journalists, demonstrating a flaw with the current regulations. Seems like a good opportunity to discuss the downsides to this as I was doing, don't you think? You're approaching this subject as though it's about some innocent chef from abroad who wants to open up a restaurant in the U.S. I'm sorry to tell you that it's quite different.


Like that ex-spy that sold the Trump dossier. Once he left the MI6 or where ever he was working, there wasn't any reason he could do work for American citizens. It would be one thing if Harvey Winston was engaged in secret negotiations with Mossad or whoever, trading favors that would allow a foreign government to underhandedly influence US policy. That's the kind of thing that would get written off as a tin-foil conspiracy unless there's evidence. But there's nothing wrong, or even particularly unusual with hiring someone who happened to have previous employment with another government. That's just capitalism at work.

Not that I'm saying what Winston was doing was good, obviously; it was kind of creepy of him tbh. But you're getting upset for the wrong reasons.


During a discussion about flaws in national security, you raise a foreign flaw in national security to justify it? Not only is the example not even remotely similar, but to dismiss these newfound concerns as just "kind of creepy of him tbh" doesn't add anything to the conversation at all. Are you okay with organizations like Black Cube continuing their operations in the future? What is your opinion on "former" foreign agents opening up spy businesses in your own country?
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Posted 11/7/17 , edited 11/8/17
(Didn't read the article) But I do think that when you have such a large amount of power and resources at your disposal you have options available to you that are tiers above what most people can access. Hasn't high level politics and positions where people have a similar degree of pwer been a super high stakes game where people are tying to do whatever they can to stay in power for like the longest time? What's kinda mind blowing is imagining how many leaps and bounds have been made with our advances in technology. I don't think this stuff is crazy but what I do think is a bit crazy is that people think that this stuff isn't possible.
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Posted 11/7/17 , edited 11/8/17

redwine2 wrote:

It tells me a lot when you start off presuming that I'm unable to distinguish between current and former employee status. The reason I didn't add the word "former" at the start of "foreign agent" was actually because I believed it was redundant, as this is one big spy network where people can exchange information. If you think that I misread the article as current Mossad agents working odd-jobs for Harvey Weinstein, it's understandable why you might consider right-wingers brain-damaged enough to not distinguish past and present. You have a distorted perception of them.


Reusing my previous example, there were a couple of right-wing forumers who assumed that employing that British spy was pretty much the same thing as Trump campaign employees meeting with Russian Goverment reps, and tried to draw false equivalence between them. I assumed this was more of the same. I do appear to have jumped to conclusions, and I am sorry about that. But considering there are right wingers on this very forum who failed to make that distinction, I take offense to your claims about my perception.


You also seem to be perfectly fine with former intelligence agents from foreign countries operating spy businesses in the United States as long as they abide by the law. It's almost as though you forgot that this thread is about former spies from a foreign country gangstalking victims and journalists, demonstrating a flaw with the current regulations. Seems like a good opportunity to discuss the downsides to this as I was doing, don't you think? You're approaching this subject as though it's about some innocent chef from abroad who wants to open up a restaurant in the U.S. I'm sorry to tell you that it's quite different.


That's capitalism for you. I wouldn't say I'm fine with it, but it's worth pointing out that the stuff they were apparently doing isn't any different then what American-born private investigators sometimes do.


During a discussion about flaws in national security, you raise a foreign flaw in national security to justify it? Not only is the example not even remotely similar, but to dismiss these newfound concerns as just "kind of creepy of him tbh" doesn't add anything to the conversation at all. Are you okay with organizations like Black Cube continuing their operations in the future? What is your opinion on "former" foreign agents opening up spy businesses in your own country?


I'd like to think that at the very least, our own intelligence agencies are keeping an eye on such individuals. And for all we know, they are.
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Posted 11/7/17 , edited 11/8/17

redwine2 wrote:


Mishio1 wrote:

Something you and some of the other people on the CR forum don't seem have quite wrapped your head around is the difference between government agents and private citizens who used to work with a government. The thing is, once these people leaver their governments' employment, they're essentially their own man, albeit presumably within certain restrictions like following their country's laws and not divulging classified info they might be privy to. There's nothing inherently wrong with such people hiring themselves out to work internationally.


It tells me a lot when you start off presuming that I'm unable to distinguish between current and former employee status. The reason I didn't add the word "former" at the start of "foreign agent" was actually because I believed it was redundant, as this is one big spy network where people can exchange information. If you think that I misread the article as current Mossad agents working odd-jobs for Harvey Weinstein, it's understandable why you might consider right-wingers brain-damaged enough to not distinguish past and present. You have a distorted perception of them.

You also seem to be perfectly fine with former intelligence agents from foreign countries operating spy businesses in the United States as long as they abide by the law. It's almost as though you forgot that this thread is about former spies from a foreign country gangstalking victims and journalists, demonstrating a flaw with the current regulations. Seems like a good opportunity to discuss the downsides to this as I was doing, don't you think? You're approaching this subject as though it's about some innocent chef from abroad who wants to open up a restaurant in the U.S. I'm sorry to tell you that it's quite different.


Like that ex-spy that sold the Trump dossier. Once he left the MI6 or where ever he was working, there wasn't any reason he could do work for American citizens. It would be one thing if Harvey Winston was engaged in secret negotiations with Mossad or whoever, trading favors that would allow a foreign government to underhandedly influence US policy. That's the kind of thing that would get written off as a tin-foil conspiracy unless there's evidence. But there's nothing wrong, or even particularly unusual with hiring someone who happened to have previous employment with another government. That's just capitalism at work.

Not that I'm saying what Winston was doing was good, obviously; it was kind of creepy of him tbh. But you're getting upset for the wrong reasons.


During a discussion about flaws in national security, you raise a foreign flaw in national security to justify it? Not only is the example not even remotely similar, but to dismiss these newfound concerns as just "kind of creepy of him tbh" doesn't add anything to the conversation at all. Are you okay with organizations like Black Cube continuing their operations in the future? What is your opinion on "former" foreign agents opening up spy businesses in your own country?


What actions do you suggest the government take?
mxdan 
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Posted 11/7/17 , edited 11/8/17
This establishes complete and total awareness. Instead of Harvey being a sick individual in my eyes he is now beyond a shadow of doubt deplorable. His case is now pretty much solidified now legally as well. The things he could of claimed in court are now very limited and with good reason.
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Posted 11/8/17 , edited 11/8/17

redwine2 wrote:
A lot of people not just on here, are missing the bigger implications, which is that this case shows that foreign agents are able to openly operate at a mafia-like level and gangstalk/possibly blackmail civilians and journalists. It's easy to just shrug this off as something that happens in a rich-man's world, but to act like this was common knowledge (not specifically referring to you) would be a bit disingenuous, as it's pretty clear that this is something that would have been considered tinfoil-hattery if it were brought up in the past. It's not something that really crosses someone's mind until it actually happens to them.


Viewing it as "foreign agents" impacting our country is a bit excessive, personally speaking.
Mossad agents are often known to be some of the best well-trained military personnel in the world (in all fields).
Another well-known private intelligence agencies that have been in the news lately is Fusion GPS; which is why I was slightly surprised that more people weren't aware of other companies with like-minded "objectives".
It wasn't that I expected everybody to know about Black Cube, AEGIS, Fusion GPS, or Kroll.
I was more so indicating that with companies like Fusion GPS being in the spotlight that I assumed that more people would know about these kinds of "private intelligence companies" that consider themselves experts at "risk management".


redwine2 wrote:
It's clearly a matter of national security, and deserves more attention in the future whether more serious measures should be taken as civilians and journalists don't have the resources to defend themselves. Having journalists silenced all across the country would be a bit of a problem, don't you think? Journalists put their lives on the line to get stuff like this out. In fact I'm surprised this isn't a legitimate argument for gun ownership, in a world where highly skilled foreign intelligence agents are able to stalk and in the worst case even murder. That recently happened to the journalist who leaked the Panama Papers, who was killed with a bomb planted in her car.


Again, I find it a hard stretch to consider it a matter of "national security".
The vast majority of these companies operate in a realm to assist in litigation negotiations or "risk consultancy".
The reality is that Fortune 500 companies will always utilize agencies that can get the job done.
Essentially, it's capitalism at its "finest".
Organizations/Companies like Black Cube, AEGIS, Kroll Inc, Unity Resources Group, and Fusion GPS will continue to be hired for numerous reasons.
The reason why I placed quotations around risk consultancy is due to the fact that the phrasing is strikingly vague.
Weinstein likely hired Black Cube as risk consultants to determine the level of risk that these women presented.
In the corporate world, the same is done when you are focused on competitive intelligence, ensuring ex-employees are following their NDA (Big Tech and Pharma companies utilize these services extensively), or performing litigation support (determining how great of a risk a breach of contract will be, financially speaking).
Most, if not all, of these companies, have close ties to intelligence agencies in the United States, United Kingdom, Australia, Israel, and Europe.

In other words, even if you considered it a matter of national security - our government already works with these organizations.
As mentioned, Fusion GPS has been in the news focusing on how they've been hired by both Democrats and Republicans to "scour up dirt" on President Trump or other political persons.
It's all under the same umbrella.
They provide a service, people are willing to pay for the service.
It doesn't just happen in the "rich man's world" as we're seeing it leak out into the public on numerous levels.
For the record, Black Cube was in the news about four (or five?) years ago.
It appears that most people forgot about them.
They're usually the company that forms an ironclad legal case against an individual/corporation's opponent - at any cost (including hunting down the guilty individual, bringing them back to the country that the legal proceedings are happening in, and get a legal summons to court for them).
Weinstein's use of them is a bit on the far extreme side but that's not to say it won't happen in the future by another customer of theirs.
Humms 
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Posted 11/9/17 , edited 11/9/17
Bad touch Weinstein.

I say. If you kept your mouth shut for that long. You did it for the money. They are scared of losing their career, but once it was fully established. Oh looky looky

You want to be an actress don't you? I'm the only one that can make it happen, just one little thing I forgot to mention.

Welcome to the entertainment business.

I don't really care, because one way or another people put themselves in that position. So honestly they make almost the same amount of excuses.

Oh well, I'm not a victim, so I can't say anything definitive. I just like to say things that are on my mind.

You know, the Bad touch culture. I'm probably just randomly saying things, but I'm on break, and I'm bored.

runec 
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Posted 11/9/17 , edited 11/9/17
Man, this seems like a heck of a lot of money and effort he put into this.

It would have been easier and less expensive to just, you know, not be a complete garbage human being to begin with.



redwine2 wrote:
It's clearly a matter of national security, and deserves more attention in the future whether more serious measures should be taken as civilians and journalists don't have the resources to defend themselves.


Going into the private sector is really common for military and intelligence specialists. It's certainly a huge industry within the US with US nationals being contractors on foreign soil. I mean, civilians certainly didn't have the resources to defend themselves from Black Water.

I know two such ex military now private sector types myself. Hell, one of them is my best friend. Double Hell, I suppose I'm technically one of them as I was a private subcontractor for two US agencies on foreign soil up here in Canuckistan. Triple Hell, domestic and foreign governments are often some of the biggest clients of these kind of private sector firms.

When you leave the military or intelligence community you tend to only have a Certain Set of Skills(tm) to offer the private market.





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Posted 11/9/17 , edited 11/9/17
People still care about this?
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