Post Reply Should I be worried?
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20 / F / Germany
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Posted 12/6/17 , edited 12/6/17
I have only recently started going to college. I am noticing that there is so much stuff to learn that I can barely keep up with the classes. In fact, I have already given up on trying to keep up with some of my classes because I know that I need more time in order to fully digest and understand the stuff that I have to learn. Now I am wondering if that is a bad thing. Am I just too slow and not fit for college or is this completely normal? While it is true that I can just skim through the stuff that we are doing during a particular class, it has no use for the long run. I am the type of person who needs context and all the relevant information to make sense of something.
Posted 12/6/17 , edited 12/6/17
What's your major if you mind me asking?
Oh nevermind
^
y too many credit hours sounds about right
V


Posted 12/6/17 , edited 12/6/17


Time to withdrawal from some classes before it effects your GPA.
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20 / F / Germany
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Posted 12/6/17 , edited 12/6/17

Madamspica wrote:

What's your major if you mind me asking?


I study in Germany and am therefore unfamiliar with the education/college system in the US and elsewhere. All I can say with certainty is that I will have to spend 3 years in college to get my bachelor's degree. After that, I can go for a master's degree if I wish to continue my education. For the first two semesters, I have to finish 8 classes. I can do that in three semesters, but that is not the optimal way to do it. I picked 4 classes this semester (statistics, accounting, law and mathematics). Does that answer your question?
Posted 12/6/17 , edited 12/6/17

Nalaniel wrote:


Madamspica wrote:

What's your major if you mind me asking?


I study in German and am therefore unfamiliar with the education/college system in the US and elsewhere. All I can say with certainty is that I will have to spend 3 years in college to get my bachelor's degree. After that, I can go for a master's degree if I wish to continue my education. For the first two semesters, I have to finish 8 classes. I can do that in three semesters, but that is not the optimal way to do it. I picked 4 classes this semester (statistics, accounting, law and mathematics). Does that answer your question?


Yes it does, thank you. I see you're quite ambitious in a hurry , but If I could make a suggestion, you might want to slow down a bit before you burn out. Most undergraduate degree seekers do it in four, and if you are getting dangerously close to burning out. That's better than having to quit, don't you agree? No offense, but you want to stay in, but ... wait let me stop.

Look. you might not really care and I didn't want to bring this up but, relevant:

I did something this before, what it sounds like you are doing, took day and night classes ( some night classes mon, tue and thursday 3hrs long lectures, with day classes, working into the ground, little to no sleep, it nearly killed me, i burned out for a semester and it made me have to miss my graduation on time. i got there, but not with my peers

Anyway see that it does matter to not have to go through that ordeal. Thought I'd just be nice and give some friendly advice -_^




NOTE : Speaking from here idk , nvm, just... pace yourself
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22 / M / Prison
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Posted 12/6/17 , edited 12/7/17
Young adulthood is filled with such stories. Mental growth doesn't stop once one is 18, nor when one is 30 or 60. It is a process. Despite this, the general model of High School in many countries often fails to prepares students for the rigors of independent life. First, the safety net comes off. You'll have to vouch for yourself, and will find that far less excuses are accepted. You will have to moderate your time, then accept consequences where they occur.

In any case, better to fail now then even later.
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Posted 12/7/17 , edited 12/7/17
if possible, it's better to bow out of some of your classes and simply try to pick them up next year, it could mean you're going to college for an extra year or two, but, at least you'll be able to focus on your grades and your GPA won't drop as badly. otherwise, you're going to be showing a lot of failing/failed even bad grades. however there could be tutors that might be able to help, that's an option (I hope) if you're unable to drop some of the classes.
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