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Post Reply Do you cook?
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29 / M
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Posted 2/18/18 , edited 2/19/18
I've been cooking since I was 5, learning from grandma in the kitchen pretty much every day.

Our family doesn't really eat dessert or sweet stuff or much bread, though, so I have no baking experience. I would like to learn.
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26 / M / Somewhere
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Posted 2/18/18 , edited 2/19/18
I try and cook. I know how to make many simple things (such as pasta, rice, meat and fish based dishes) and am actively trying to learn more, which I'm definitely achieving. Probably order food more often than I should
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27 / M / Dallas
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Posted 2/18/18 , edited 2/19/18
I can make spaghetti, sausages, and chicken. I recently got a crock pot, and I'm trying to learn new recipes.
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29 / M
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Posted 2/23/18 , edited 2/23/18
Best pieces of advice I have to offer for people reading this, from personal experience and from learning from people better than me and/or who taught me what I know today:

1. Your knife is basically an extension of your hand. Keep it sharp, learn knife skills, and just practice. Your main knife does 90% of your kitchen work. The type matters less than people insist, as long as you're comfortable using it and you're efficient. You'll cut yourself from time to time, but don't let that deter you. You'll get better and your cuts will heal.

2. Don't learn recipes, learn techniques. I know people who can eyeball everything and wing a meal and come up with great stuff. You will never reach this level if you memorize recipes instead of learning skills. You can't because there are infinite recipes, whereas skills are adaptable and flexible, and improve with time. Recipes are adjustable anyway, strict measurements will not help you as much as skill.

3. Control the temperature. Gas stoves, ovens, grills, etc. vary widely in output and you will need to learn to "read" the heat instead of relying solely on recommended cooking times.

4. Don't buy a bunch of gadgets. Keep it simple, basic, and versatile. Gimmicky gadgets are overspecialized, a waste of money, and only contribute to clutter and cleaning difficulties.

5. Always learn and improve. Don't just say "this is the best thing ever" and leave it at that and always make it the same way the next 20 years. There's always room for improvement. It's extremely rare to produce a dish that doesn't benefit from more work. It likely takes years to refine something to that point.

6. Clean as you cook. Don't wait until you're done to clean everything all at once. That's when it becomes a chore.

7. Taste as you cook. This is fundamental, takes little effort, and helps you perfect the seasoning in your dish.

8. Properly care for your tools. Don't just jam everything into the washer and leave it for a week. Care for each individual tool and maintain it properly.

9. Eat lots of different foods. Don't be afraid to try new things, they can inspire you. As reading is to writers, eating is to cooks.

10. Substitute comparable ingredients in recipes you already know for a new flavor. In time, this can lead to discoveries and new recipes.
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19 / in the netherworld
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Posted 3/6/18 , edited 3/7/18
My favorite recipe is the spicy Korean sticky rice cakes <333

It's surprisingly easy.... But the problem with it is that there is no vegetables in the recipe... So having a side-salad for "good health" is needed... Or so I think
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18 / M / canada
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Posted 3/7/18 , edited 3/8/18
I will be in my first year of culinary school in September,to be honest I've always loved cooking and hoping i can become a chef.I mainly specialize in Italian dishes but i love cooking Asian dishes too.
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100 / F / ɴᴇᴠᴇʀᴡʜᴇʀᴇ
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Posted 3/9/18 , edited 3/9/18
I do but mostly just for myself.
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16 / F / brockton
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Posted 3/9/18 , edited 3/9/18
Only pancakes
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a cave
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Posted 3/9/18 , edited 3/9/18
I didn't really cook much til about a 8 or so months ago. I wanted to get a bit healthier about the shit I was eating. So, I started with Blue Apron, one of those ingredient/meal boxes. Found I enjoyed it. Switched off of that to doing my own meals. I try to mix it up, everything from a pot roast to risotto to whatever sounds good. With work, it makes it hard to cook during the week, so I try to cook something big on the weekends that I can have as leftovers. Or I'll also grill up some chicken to do salads during the week.

My next step is trying out bread baking.
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33 / F
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Posted 3/9/18 , edited 3/10/18
I can cook some, but not a lot.
I do want to bake cookies better...for some reason my cookies go splat flat on the sheet while baking o_o
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a cave
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Posted 3/11/18 , edited 3/11/18

mwee_mwee wrote:

I can cook some, but not a lot.
I do want to bake cookies better...for some reason my cookies go splat flat on the sheet while baking o_o


Are you at a high altitude? Look up some recipe conversions if you are. This can happen.
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28 / M / Texas
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Posted 3/11/18 , edited 3/11/18
I cook almost twice a day, but it hasn't varied too much lately. I have no microwave, toaster, or dishwasher; all I have are a knife, cutting board, two pots, two pans, stove-top gas oven, a couple floors, and a small charcoal bbq grill. I wing almost everything I make too, from soft-boiled eggs and toast (we call them dippy-do's), dim sum dumplings, stuffed peppers, wings, sliders, soups, sauces, pastas, goulashes, fried chicken and gravy, and I even made a pretty good fried fish and chips including mushy peas and homemade tartar sauce once. I primarily cook tacos nowadays though, cheap raw chopped veggies in corn tortillas with bbq chicken to be healthy and easy. When I was younger I even picked up a lot of baking techniques from being around my grandma, so I've made several pies and cobblers before, handmade crust and everything. I also spend time gardening (not during the winter, no greenhouse) and get a lot of fresh produce and herbs that way, plus I have a couple chickens for fresh eggs on the daily.

This is just off the top of my head though. Put any recipe in front of me and I'll be able to do something with it. I'm no chef though, just a young domesticated bachelor. I have several friends who easily put me to shame, but they're cooks lol
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29 / F
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Posted 3/12/18 , edited 3/12/18
I cook sometimes
Posted 3/12/18 , edited 3/12/18
I do out of necessity, as I'm the only one that does. I prefer cooked meals to raw foods as most do, so it's a relative boon, it is.
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33 / M / Ohio
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Posted 3/12/18 , edited 3/12/18

Morbidhanson wrote:

Best pieces of advice I have to offer for people reading this, from personal experience and from learning from people better than me and/or who taught me what I know today:

1. Your knife is basically an extension of your hand. Keep it sharp, learn knife skills, and just practice. Your main knife does 90% of your kitchen work. The type matters less than people insist, as long as you're comfortable using it and you're efficient. You'll cut yourself from time to time, but don't let that deter you. You'll get better and your cuts will heal.

2. Don't learn recipes, learn techniques. I know people who can eyeball everything and wing a meal and come up with great stuff. You will never reach this level if you memorize recipes instead of learning skills. You can't because there are infinite recipes, whereas skills are adaptable and flexible, and improve with time. Recipes are adjustable anyway, strict measurements will not help you as much as skill.

3. Control the temperature. Gas stoves, ovens, grills, etc. vary widely in output and you will need to learn to "read" the heat instead of relying solely on recommended cooking times.

4. Don't buy a bunch of gadgets. Keep it simple, basic, and versatile. Gimmicky gadgets are overspecialized, a waste of money, and only contribute to clutter and cleaning difficulties.

5. Always learn and improve. Don't just say "this is the best thing ever" and leave it at that and always make it the same way the next 20 years. There's always room for improvement. It's extremely rare to produce a dish that doesn't benefit from more work. It likely takes years to refine something to that point.

6. Clean as you cook. Don't wait until you're done to clean everything all at once. That's when it becomes a chore.

7. Taste as you cook. This is fundamental, takes little effort, and helps you perfect the seasoning in your dish.

8. Properly care for your tools. Don't just jam everything into the washer and leave it for a week. Care for each individual tool and maintain it properly.

9. Eat lots of different foods. Don't be afraid to try new things, they can inspire you. As reading is to writers, eating is to cooks.

10. Substitute comparable ingredients in recipes you already know for a new flavor. In time, this can lead to discoveries and new recipes.


this was very helpful. thank you much!
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