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Post Reply '' Sorry, due to licensing limitations ...''
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Posted 4/7/18 , edited 8/26/18
So, I looked into getting CrunchyRoll Mainly to Watch Konosuba and Spice and Wolf since my friend wants me to watch that. but with both of them it says'' Sorry, due to licensing limitations, videos are unavailable in your region.''
Luckily I'm still in the free trial but, I am having trouble understanding why these would not be allowed to be streamed to Holland.
is it really just localising thats the problem, or something Law related? The latter once seems unlikely to me as as far as I know both don't break any Laws in their show.
But if this is the case for evrything I want to watch I don't think I'll stick around after the trial ends.
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Posted 4/7/18 , edited 8/26/18
Yeah it seems a little weird, they seem to have started regionblocking more and more shows for some godforsaken reason. Persona 5, Boku no hero S3(even though the first 2 simulcasted just fine) and tokyo ghoul at least so far in this season are not avalaible to me. That doesn't leave much reason to stay subscribed and ''go back to the old ways'' so to speak. It sucks but what can you do...
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Posted 4/7/18 , edited 4/7/18
it means some other company has the rights to those shows in your region
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Posted 4/7/18 , edited 4/7/18

HOOfan_1 wrote:

it means some other company has the rights to those shows in your region


As far as I know Crunchyroll is advertised as '' the'' anime Streaming service here. yet evrything I really want to watch either isn't on the site at all or not avaible for me.
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Posted 4/7/18 , edited 4/7/18
I just cancelled my subscription that I had going since november 2014. 2nd season in a row I'm not able to watch anything I'm interesting in. Previous seasons, licensing got only worse. I'm not paying for a service just to pay for an alternative to watch the shows I'm interested in.
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Posted 4/7/18 , edited 4/7/18

Sindoray wrote:

I just cancelled my subscription that I had going since november 2014. 2nd season in a row I'm not able to watch anything I'm interesting in. Previous seasons, licensing got only worse. I'm not paying for a service just to pay for an alternative to watch the shows I'm interested in.


yeah, Sadly enough, I'm just gonna watch what I do like in the trial and I guess after that I'll cancel my subscription till they actually can offer what I'd like, was surprised to see not even older anime's are on here, Ex. Rozen maiden, Higurashi and some others I enjoyed
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Posted 4/7/18 , edited 4/7/18

balthazar147 wrote:

So, I looked into getting CrunchyRoll Mainly to Watch Konosuba and Spice and Wolf since my friend wants me to watch that. but with both of them it says'' Sorry, due to licensing limitations, videos are unavailable in your region.''
Luckily I'm still in the free trial but, I am having trouble understanding why these would not be allowed to be streamed to Holland.
is it really just localising thats the problem, or something Law related? The latter once seems unlikely to me as as far as I know both don't break any Laws in their show.

It is a matter of law; copyright law. The owner of the copyright either licenses the title or designates a company to handle that licensing for them. If they believe they can get more in total by slicing up those rights by region, they'll do so. They really don't care whether those rights are fully utilized or not. For example, they may require a company interested in digital or home video sales also pay for streaming rights, but that company doesn't stream. They may only offer a license for a specific region of set of countries that may include countries that the licensor has no interest in serving. Unless they are permitted by contract to sub-license those rights, know who to offer them to, and decide it is worth the bother, those rights will remain unused.

As an example of rights remaining unused, lets consider a show you mentioned, Spice and Wolf. That show is actually sub-licensed from Funimation, which CR partnered with in fall 2016. (Technically, only Spice and Wolf II is, as the first series has yet to be brought over to CR). At the time it was licensed, Funimation was only interested in selling home video to and streaming to the US & Canada, yet the rights they sub-licensed to CR include South Africa, which they still don't stream to or sell to. That means those rights were unused but also unavailable to anyone else until then. Some titles that have come over from Funimation also included some of the Nordic or Scandinavian countries, and those certainly were not used by them either, but were likewise unavailable to anyone in the interim.



But if this is the case for evrything I want to watch I don't think I'll stick around after the trial ends.

Which means the free trial did its job, specifically, letting you experience if the premium membership would be of value to you.




Dexym wrote:

Yeah it seems a little weird, they seem to have started regionblocking more and more shows for some godforsaken reason. Persona 5, Boku no hero S3(even though the first 2 simulcasted just fine) and tokyo ghoul at least so far in this season are not avalaible to me. That doesn't leave much reason to stay subscribed and ''go back to the old ways'' so to speak. It sucks but what can you do...

Anyone familiar with Aniplex of America should have expected Persona 5 to be unavailable on CR to any country east of the UK and Ireland as soon as it was known they held the rights.


Tokyo Ghoul;re is so far unavailable to anyone (including the US and Canada) on CR except the UK & Ireland. (CR managed to make a separate deal for those countries with Anime Limited). For many countries in Europe, the streaming rights are held by Wakanim:
https://www.wakanim.tv/sc/v2/catalogue/show/360/tokyo-ghoulre

NOTE: They also have Persona 5.

Funimation has the show here, which since the partnership in fall 2016, should have meant they would also make it available on CR, but for some reason it has thus far been an exception. Given that they also have not brought the first series over either, many suspect some type of licensing issue prevents it.


If you had access to the first two My Hero Academia series, it seems odd you don't have access to the third. You may want to contact customer service, as the listed regions for the third series appear to include all countries listed for the third:

The listed regions for the the first two series, per http://www.crunchyroll.com/forumtopic-985789/spring-2017-lineup-updated-with-times:

US, Canada, United Kingdom, Ireland, Australia, New Zealand, South Africa, Denmark, Iceland, Norway, Sweden.

The listed regions for the third series, per http://www.crunchyroll.com/forumtopic-1016913/spring-2018-simulcasts:

US, Canada, United Kingdom, Ireland, Australia, New Zealand, South Africa, Denmark, Iceland, Norway, Sweden, and Latin America.
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Posted 4/7/18 , edited 4/7/18

TheAncientOne wrote:

It is a matter of law; copyright law. The owner of the copyright either licenses the title or designates a company to handle that licensing for them. If they believe they can get more in total by slicing up those rights by region, they'll do so. They really don't care whether those rights are fully utilized or not. For example, they may require a company interested in digital or home video sales also pay for streaming rights, but that company doesn't stream. They may only offer a license for a specific region of set of countries that may include countries that the licensor has no interest in serving. Unless they are permitted by contract to sub-license those rights, know who to offer them to, and decide it is worth the bother, those rights will remain unused.

As an example of rights remaining unused, lets consider a show you mentioned, Spice and Wolf. That show is actually sub-licensed from Funimation, which CR partnered with in fall 2016. (Technically, only Spice and Wolf II is, as the first series has yet to be brought over to CR). At the time it was licensed, Funimation was only interested in selling home video to and streaming to the US & Canada, yet the rights they sub-licensed to CR include South Africa, which they still don't stream to or sell to. That means those rights were unused but also unavailable to anyone else until then. Some titles that have come over from Funimation also included some of the Nordic or Scandinavian countries, and those certainly were not used by them either, but were likewise unavailable to anyone in the interim.



But if this is the case for evrything I want to watch I don't think I'll stick around after the trial ends.

Which means the free trial did its job, specifically, letting you experience if the premium membership would be of value to you.




Thank you for clarifying this a little, I expected as much that this isn't a decision CR makes just to '' Screw with their patrons'' I've heard only good things so far about CR and from what I've seen so far the Service is really good. i just don't think as a european customer I'll get the full use out of it as I hoped. I'll browse the list and see what I'll like, and hopefully there's enough for me to get some use out of it, al be it the trial period, 1 month, or 3, in any caseI'm thankfull CR Gives the option to test it all out, and hopefully in the future hope to use the service to its fullest if the licence holders descide to be nicer


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Posted 4/7/18 , edited 4/8/18
There are two ANN articles which have points about why anime is region-locked and why it is especially pertinent for old series which have been completed for awhile (and the older they are, the more impossible it is to change).

This article doesn't specifically address why any one company hasn't got specific titles for your region, there may also be established business relationships in the way as well. It's a more general answer, and the same basic marketing principles apply to internet streaming as this one about physical DVD releases, even though region codes do not exactly cover the same areas as streaming regions.

https://www.animenewsnetwork.com/answerman/2018-01-12/.126338


Region codes were, and still are, deemed necessary because, unlike with video games, different companies control the rights to movies and TV shows in different parts of the world. Obviously you have different publishers in different places (I.e. Funimation in the US and Canada; Manga Entertainment in the UK, Kazé in France and Germany, Yamato Video in Italy, etc.). But often the licensors that each of those parts of the world have to work with aren't even the same. With a Japanese production committee, it's not uncommon for different companies in the committee to handle distribution in different parts of the world -- I.e., one company would become the licensor to Europe and Africa, while another would handle the English speaking parts of the world. Even within the same corporations, these different territories are usually handled by different licensing offices.

Being able to sell the rights to a film or TV show in different territories is an important way that shows make their budgets back. Pre-selling distribution rights to different distributors in different parts of the world are very often how productions get financed in the first place. It's important to protect those business partners -- if physical media were able to freely cross borders, distributors would constantly be competing to sell the same shows, and very likely wouldn't make much money doing so.

At any rate, that's why it's important to protect each publisher's exclusivity for a given show in their territory. Whenever new technology is invented with professionally made movies and TV shows in mind, much effort is made to protect those businesses, and that means barriers between different territories. Since the major Hollywood studios play an outsized role in the development and approval of new technology, their concerns and business practices get the most consideration.

And within the answer to this question raised by fans fed up with licenses not available in their region for older shows you find the same barriers a streaming company like CR will run into as well. They have to deal with the Japanese producers for each individual title, and those producers then have to go through sometimes impossible contractual barriers. So even if CR or Funimation is motivated to do so, the Japanese producer may not see enough reason to go through the cost of bringing everyone involved back to the table to create a new contract.

https://www.animenewsnetwork.com/answerman/2018-02-09/.127558

For a licensor, it's very seldom a matter of a show just sitting on a shelf, gathering dust and not making any money. Licensing a show out to a publisher is a great deal of work on their part. If they're going to engage in all the legal and logistical legwork that's involved, it had better be worth it.

When an anime is produced, the producer has to engage in all sorts of contracts -- with the original creator, with the director, with the writers, with the musicians, with the talent, and with whoever else contributed money to the production. These contracts make them forever obligated to these people. Whenever a new opportunity comes along for that show, be it an international licensing deal, a new DVD or Blu-ray release in Japan, a streaming or TV deal or whatever else, all of those people have to be paid royalties, and some of those people have to be consulted. Some even get to sign off on the deal.

For older shows, or shows that were made without proper producer oversight, some of those contracts don't cover modern things like streaming. Some don't even cover the use of the work internationally. Those people (or their next of kin) then have to be tracked down and a new contract has to be agreed upon and signed with them. In the case of some of the master agreements with the creator, sometimes there's even an expiration date, after which the creator can completely kill any further release of the show, as if it never existed.
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Posted 4/7/18 , edited 4/7/18
I don't even see region locks mentioned in the TOS.
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Posted 4/7/18 , edited 4/8/18

mikeloeven wrote:

I don't even see region locks mentioned in the TOS



you agree that you will not do any of the following while using or accessing the Site or Services:
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Circumvent, disable or otherwise interfere with security related features of the Site or features that prevent or restrict use
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Posted 4/7/18 , edited 4/8/18
That is pretty weak legal language there and open to interpretation. It essentially says don't hack the site ie tamper with the site or servers.
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Posted 4/7/18 , edited 4/8/18
They purposely use generic legal language... If they spell out any specific methods by name, that becomes an invitation to look for and try them. Also, it's for future-proofing against any means that don't currently exist.
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Posted 4/8/18 , edited 9/1/18

It is a matter of law; copyright law.


And it's a matter of product. If your ask for money, for non existent service/product, then people will stop buying your product.

I'm not interested into the garbage anime thats left cause none wants to licence it, and I'm not going to pay for products unavailable to me. I'm not asking CR to break laws/rules, but if they don't provide a product, they shouldn't expect payments. If they provide only garbage, then people obviously won't bother looking, let alone buying. If CR cannot provide licensed shows, then I'm not paying as well.
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Posted 4/8/18 , edited 4/8/18

Sindoray wrote:

And it's a matter of product. If your ask for money, for non existent service/product, then people will stop buying your product.

I have no problem with that. Keep in mind it isn't as if someone has a gun to people's heads, forcing them to subscribe to CR. CR offers a free trial, so one doesn't even have to pay to experience what it would be like with a subscription. They also offer a month-to-month subscription by default, which means you aren't committing long term. Unlike some services, they also offer access to content for free, as long as you are willing to "pay" by watching ads.

If none of that suits you, you can use another service (if one is available in your area), or even go the piracy route if you feel morally justified. For those that pirate, however, keep in mind that you don't get a "vote" on what new anime gets made. If 100,000 people world wide stream the latest anime you think is trash, and 400,000 torrent the latest anime you think is good, guess which one publishers are more likely to make a sequel to or make more anime of a similar type.


Keep in mind that people that don't watch or subscribe aren't going to better their country's situation with CR. The less viewers there are in your country, the less reason CR has to worry about expending effort to provide content there. Many countries really don't provide enough viewers for CR to try obtaining content unless they can get it for a broad area (with "worldwide outside of Asia" being the most common).
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