Should the metaphor "ship it" be taken positively?

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26 / M / Bulgaria, South-E...
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Posted 6/20/18 , edited 6/20/18
I have seen before the phrase "ship *something*", but as being autistic, I hesitate if it is a positive comment. Please, tell me. When someone says that something should be shipped, what does this mean, that they like it or that they don't? I assume that they do.

Thanks to everyone who answers.
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Posted 6/20/18 , edited 6/20/18
Without context, it cannot be said to be positive, negative, or neutral.

In regards to a project, to create examples out of thin air, if a person or a group of persons have achieved a state where they believe the project is perfect and can no longer be improved, and they say 'ship it', that is probably positive (for them). If a person or group of persons have a project that they do not care if it can be improved any further, and they say 'ship it', that appears to be somewhat neutral. If a person or a group of persons have a project that is deeply flawed and they can no longer improve it due to deadlines, the death of one or more members of the staff, their families, or their business, and they say 'ship it', that is probably pretty negative.

In regards to "shipping" two or more characters in a work of fiction or speculative non-fiction, that's probably overall a negative in my opinion, because matchmaking is a vice that should be stamped out thoroughly, as well as being both poor word usage and confusing word usage.

In regards to the industry of shipping, which is the transportation of goods via land, sea, and air vectors, it is probably neutral since that is a professional occupation and keeps the world and its goods distributed properly.
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Posted 6/20/18 , edited 6/20/18
The phrase can also be used as a (meme-like) synonym for the words: "approve" or "like".

"I ship it" would mean you personally approve of whatever was being talked about. The subject wouldn't need to be in the context of any of the various definitions of the word "ship" itself.

"I don't ship it" would mean you don't approve.

Person A: "I hear CR is going to get an HTML5 player one day."
Person B: "I ship it."

"I hear they outsourced to Moldova though and it is taking forever."
"I definitely don't ship that."
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Posted 6/20/18 , edited 6/20/18
Thank you for the responses! ☺️
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22 / M / Iðavöllr
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Posted 6/20/18 , edited 6/20/18
It's just a meme, bro.
Posted 6/22/18 , edited 6/22/18
It means root for the couple. Or do you not know what the other meaning of root means because you're autistic or whatever?

Root = cheer for them. Let me know if you don't know what cheer means either. Or to want 2 characters in an anime to come together. It can be gay or straight, for example you want Naruto with Sasuke, you say you ship NaruSasu.
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Posted 6/24/18 , edited 6/24/18
Not everything is positive or negative. Some things are neutral as a means for a joke/meme. Then you got negative-positives and positive-negatives like Australians like to use. They call hot women cunts and people they don't like friends. Plus you got memes which obey their own set of made up on the spot not really rules.

But "I'd ship it" is just putting two things together like fan boys/girls that sit there shipping every character of a show with every other character of a show.
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