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"U.S. is reportedly issuing out lifetime travel bands to people connected to Canada's legal cannabis industry"

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Humms 
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Posted 7/13/18 , edited 7/14/18

Mishio1 wrote:


niotabunny wrote:

war on anything has always failed, but there's nothing wrong with being against something that someone does not agree with. I'm against drugs and the research/studies I've discovered thus far, more people need to realize some of this stuff isn't good for you. recreational means just that, occasionally, not all the time, then getting into a vehicle and driving. not to mention the epidemic of other, more dangerous things that rots your body and destroys your rational thinking. makes one wonder if that one conspiracy theory is correct, let's give a certain location of the states some drugs, get them addicted and see what happens.


This goes a bit beyond "being against" it.


I heard.... from a friend of a friend of mine, that every CEO does Cocaine.

They just don't want to admit it you know.

I don't want to sound like I'm spreading any rumors, but you can totally tell.

I heard Trump always supported it you know I always did think he was to red in the face for my liking.
Bailek 
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Posted 7/14/18 , edited 7/15/18
Blame Canada
No Seriously no matter what the issue is just Blame Canada, we will just apologize and get on with our lives
And we will also apologize for having lives
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Posted 7/25/18 , edited 7/25/18

MonoDreams wrote:

I love how we keep treating a completely harmless and beneficial plant as a crime for some reason, truly amazing.


it's not harmless

Students who try marijuana at an early age and use it often are more likely to have co-occurring problems, poor health outcomes, and less occupational and educational success in young adulthood, a St. Francis Xavier University (St. FX) and University of Victoria study has found.

https://globalnews.ca/news/4257292/canadian-students-who-use-marijuana-end-up-with-poor-health-grades-study/




The middle and upper classes have been the ones out there pushing for decriminalization and legalization measures, and they have also tried to demolish the cultural taboo against smoking pot. But they themselves have chosen not to partake very much. Which is not surprising. Middle-class men and women who have jobs and families know that this is not a habit they want to take up with any regularity because it will interfere with their ability to do their jobs and take care of their families.

But the poor, who already have a hard time holding down jobs and taking care of their families, are more frequently using a drug that makes it harder for them to focus, to remember things and to behave responsibly.

Sally Satel, a psychiatrist and lecturer at Yale, says that “it is ironic that the people lobbying for liberalized marijuana access do not appear to be the group that is consuming the bulk of it.” Instead, it’s “daily and near-daily users, who are less educated, less affluent and less in control of their use.”

In fact, the typical user is much more likely to be someone at the bottom of the socioeconomic ladder, whose daily life is driven, at least in part, by the question of how and where to get more marijuana. Just consider the cost. Almost a third of users are spending a tenth of their income on marijuana. And 15 percent of users spend nearly a quarter of their income to purchase the drug. The poor have not only become the heaviest users, but their use is making them poorer.

To all the middle-class professionals out there reading this: Do you know anyone who spends a quarter of their income on pot? Of course not. But these are the people our policies and attitudes are affecting.

https://nypost.com/2016/08/20/legalized-pot-is-making-americas-lower-class-poorer-and-less-responsible/



Poor decision-making by chronic marijuana users is associated with decreased functional responsiveness to negative consequences


https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3125637/



(Reuters Health) - More visits to the emergency room by teens in Colorado are related to marijuana use than in the past, suggesting an impact of the drug’s legalization that needs closer attention, researchers say.

Between 2005 and 2015, the proportion of emergency department or urgent care visits by youth ages 13 to 20 for pot-related illnesses rose from 1.8 per 1,000 visits to 4.9 per 1,000, the study team reports in Journal of Adolescent Health.

https://www.reuters.com/article/us-health-marijuana-kids/marijuana-related-er-visits-by-colorado-teens-on-the-rise-idUSKBN1HO38A








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Posted 7/25/18 , edited 7/26/18

shinto-male wrote:
it's not harmless


No more harmful then alcohol, and certainly less then cigarettes. You're welcome to try banning those.


The middle and upper classes have been the ones out there pushing for decriminalization and legalization measures, and they have also tried to demolish the cultural taboo against smoking pot. But they themselves have chosen not to partake very much. Which is not surprising. Middle-class men and women who have jobs and families know that this is not a habit they want to take up with any regularity because it will interfere with their ability to do their jobs and take care of their families.


I don't think the partakers are in much of a position to support much of anything, politically. Since as you poonted out, its mostly low-inome people who usually partake.
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Posted 7/26/18 , edited 7/26/18
Pots not for me, but I have no problem with someone else using it. It's no worse than alcohol. and Like alcohol should be under control or not used.

This new twist would totally screw over someone I know though. And I like them and wish them well. So... can't say I'm impressed.
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45 / M / Canada
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Posted 7/26/18 , edited 7/27/18
You know what the most messed up part of this is.

They are being banned for entry because they are invested in US. pot companies.

https://www.ctvnews.ca/canada/vancouver-man-banned-from-u-s-for-pot-investment-looks-to-cross-border-1.4028614


Posted 7/27/18 , edited 7/27/18
It's what they deserve.
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45 / M / Canada
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Posted 7/28/18 , edited 7/28/18

LingLingJuju wrote:

It's what they deserve.



for investing in a legal US company? really? Cause US investors in the same company aren't getting any problems
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24 / M / behind you
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Posted 7/28/18 , edited 7/28/18
anyone remotely connected to Canada? wait the U.S is on the same landmass as Canada............ DEPORT EVERYONE!!!

can't wait to watch this one also blow up in his face.


runec wrote:


RavingDragon wrote:
War on drugs has never worked. People will do it anyways. Better to embrace it and tax it than sending someone to prison for life because they have a piece of a plant.


Hey, the for profit prisons aren't going to fill themselves.


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Posted 8/23/18 , edited 8/23/18
legalization implies that there was authority to have any say whatsoever on it to begin with.

federally speaking, this is unconstitutional. (and since most states where its illegal made it so in kneejerk to the unlawful federal action...)

the only constitutionally sensible option is deregulation, declassification.
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Posted 8/23/18 , edited 8/24/18

MonoDreams wrote:

I love how we keep treating a completely harmless and beneficial plant as a crime for some reason, truly amazing.


I personally want access to smoke it myself once or twice a month, but it would simply be biased of me to ignore university professors warning that cannabis alter brain pattern. It's a lot less destructive on society than psychopath on a bottle (alcohol), but I would never call it harmless.
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Posted 8/24/18 , edited 8/24/18
So stupid banning people for selling a bit of natural herb that just so happens to have a little bit of thc. Also, it's none of the US's business what people are legally doing in their own country.
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Posted 8/24/18 , edited 8/24/18

shinto-male wrote:


MonoDreams wrote:

I love how we keep treating a completely harmless and beneficial plant as a crime for some reason, truly amazing.


it's not harmless

Students who try marijuana at an early age and use it often are more likely to have co-occurring problems, poor health outcomes, and less occupational and educational success in young adulthood, a St. Francis Xavier University (St. FX) and University of Victoria study has found.

https://globalnews.ca/news/4257292/canadian-students-who-use-marijuana-end-up-with-poor-health-grades-study/




The middle and upper classes have been the ones out there pushing for decriminalization and legalization measures, and they have also tried to demolish the cultural taboo against smoking pot. But they themselves have chosen not to partake very much. Which is not surprising. Middle-class men and women who have jobs and families know that this is not a habit they want to take up with any regularity because it will interfere with their ability to do their jobs and take care of their families.

But the poor, who already have a hard time holding down jobs and taking care of their families, are more frequently using a drug that makes it harder for them to focus, to remember things and to behave responsibly.

Sally Satel, a psychiatrist and lecturer at Yale, says that “it is ironic that the people lobbying for liberalized marijuana access do not appear to be the group that is consuming the bulk of it.” Instead, it’s “daily and near-daily users, who are less educated, less affluent and less in control of their use.”

In fact, the typical user is much more likely to be someone at the bottom of the socioeconomic ladder, whose daily life is driven, at least in part, by the question of how and where to get more marijuana. Just consider the cost. Almost a third of users are spending a tenth of their income on marijuana. And 15 percent of users spend nearly a quarter of their income to purchase the drug. The poor have not only become the heaviest users, but their use is making them poorer.

To all the middle-class professionals out there reading this: Do you know anyone who spends a quarter of their income on pot? Of course not. But these are the people our policies and attitudes are affecting.

https://nypost.com/2016/08/20/legalized-pot-is-making-americas-lower-class-poorer-and-less-responsible/



Poor decision-making by chronic marijuana users is associated with decreased functional responsiveness to negative consequences


https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3125637/



(Reuters Health) - More visits to the emergency room by teens in Colorado are related to marijuana use than in the past, suggesting an impact of the drug’s legalization that needs closer attention, researchers say.

Between 2005 and 2015, the proportion of emergency department or urgent care visits by youth ages 13 to 20 for pot-related illnesses rose from 1.8 per 1,000 visits to 4.9 per 1,000, the study team reports in Journal of Adolescent Health.

https://www.reuters.com/article/us-health-marijuana-kids/marijuana-related-er-visits-by-colorado-teens-on-the-rise-idUSKBN1HO38A










Fair enough, but that doesn't justify banning it unless we are also proposing banning alcohol, cigarettes, and junk food.
People are going to want to make choices that are probably not the greatest for their health, but part of living in a free country is that grown adults ought to be the ones making the decision on what to put in their bodies.

The alternative is to continue the War on Drugs indefinitely which has failed to keep people from using them and is incarcerating far too many for what are essentially victim-less crimes. Prisons are not the best place to treat something that is really a substance abuse problem.

Luckily, we can all look forward to Attorney General Jeff Sessions getting fired relatively soon and perhaps a more reasonable policy change to come with it, he's the one pushing a lot of this 0 tolerance nonsense anyway. I know I'll be breaking out the champagne when it finally happens
DP0083 
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Posted 8/26/18 , edited 8/27/18
Low-income people are the main consumers of Pot? What nonsense. Canadians are on track to spend an estimated six billion dollars on Pot this year alone: most of it from illegal sources. Does anyone really think all of that cash is coming from low-income people? The use of Pot is widespread through every stratum of income and/or status. Pot is as prevalent as alcohol and it has become just as useless trying to prohibit its use as it became with alcohol. Legalizing Pot is not some Middle-Class scheme against the poor.
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Posted 12/10/18 , edited 12/10/18
In my opinion, marijuana could provide an important source of tax revenue for the government. The war on drugs is not effective anymore, and it's time to make a change. As for me, I don't take marijuana, apart from my friends' parties. Last time I tried marijuana edibles ( https://www.ncsm.nl/english/information-for-patients/make-weed-edibles ) on my best friend's birthday party. I was rather relaxed than high.
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