[Spoilers] Do you think Code Geass jumped the shark near the end of season 1?
Posted 8/18/17 , edited 8/18/17
I've been watching Code Geass for the first time, and I just finished episode 23 (22? Around there) today. It was emotionally powerful, but I felt it may have jumped the shark a little bit. This is the episode where Lelouch accidentally uses his Geass to have Euphemia order the execution of all the Japanese in the stadium, causing everyone to follow Zero in hatred towards Britannia.

Two things stood out to me:

1. I don't believe Lelouch would start revealing his Geass to Euphemia, even if he was going to team up with her. He's been incredibly secretive of his power until now and it doesn't make sense he would say "Hey, I can make you or anybody do anything...No, I'm serious!" so haphazardly, even if he trusted her.

2. Of course, the one example he had to use to explain his power was "Kill all the Japanese." I get he wanted a suitably grandiose example to make his point, but that's what he went with? Two minutes earlier he was saying how he will make her shoot him. He couldn't have said "No, I'm serious! Just now, I was about to make you shoot me, I totally could have made you do it!"? It felt like the writers backed themselves into a corner and needed a huge way to make Zero on top again.

Now, in the end, this episode was heartbreaking. Everyone was either tricked or continuing down a dark mental spiral towards insanity. It was awesome, I just think the way the show went about it jumped the shark.

What does everyone else think of this scene? Was it believable or did it push things too far?
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Posted 8/18/17 , edited 8/18/17
No. Jumping the shark occurs when a series takes a drastic turn that's hard to believe within the series' universe (not to be confused with plot twists) or introduces a worthless character who's only reason for existing is to be the new focus of attention, typically for the purpose of keeping the series alive past its peak which ends up backfiring and making it clear that the writer has run out of ideas.

Lelouch's poorly timed joked wasn't a "jump the shark" moment. Convenient for the plot, but not to that extent. He wasn't trying to reveal his geass to Euphy. She just didn't believe that Lelouch really could force her to shoot him against her will and so Lelouch kept insisting that he could by using an example of something she would never in a million years want to do. It was foreshadowed that Lelouch would lose control of his geass back during the Mao incident and again during this episode when something was wrong with C.C. when she was talking to Suzaku. "Kill all the Japanese" being the very first order after losing control was purely a coincidence but still within the realm of possibility.

Jumping the shark would be more like what happened in Kabaneri. (Major spoilers below)
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Posted 8/18/17 , edited 8/18/17
No. Having that happen was precisely in the spirit that Code Geass adopted: of the world being beyond Lelouch's control in particular, the dependence of history upon the vicissitudes of life in general, and really the pathetic nature of the human enterprise. Sometimes ridiculously unfortunate things happen, and Code Geass was not the type of show to ignore that.
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Posted 8/18/17 , edited 8/18/17
I call it "Code Geass syndrome" when they throw all logic out of the window to make it "exciting" Some people enjoy it I sure don't. It just makes no sense. If they are talking about peace a massacre is to come. If somebody dies they get hurt and if they get hurt they die. In other words they show one thing and force it to another. I watched it a long time ago so I can't remember too much but that scene is stupidly forced, I really did not like it and ended up not even watching r2.
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Posted 8/18/17 , edited 8/18/17

PhantomGundam wrote:


Lelouch's poorly timed joked wasn't a "jump the shark" moment. Convenient for the plot, but not to that extent. He wasn't trying to reveal his geass to Euphy. She just didn't believe that Lelouch really could force her to shoot him against her will and so Lelouch kept insisting that he could by using an example of something she would never in a million years want to do. It was foreshadowed that Lelouch would lose control of his geass back during the Mao incident and again during this episode when something was wrong with C.C. when she was talking to Suzaku. "Kill all the Japanese" being the very first order after losing control was purely a coincidence but still within the realm of possibility.



Yes, but not exactly.


auroraloose wrote:

No. Having that happen was precisely in the spirit that Code Geass adopted: of the world being beyond Lelouch's control in particular, the dependence of history upon the vicissitudes of life in general, and really the pathetic nature of the human enterprise. Sometimes ridiculously unfortunate things happen, and Code Geass was not the type of show to ignore that.


Not quite.

First point - besides Mao and when C.C. was talking to Suzaku, there was also the part earlier in that episode, when Shirley was following Lulu, and he stops and saves some guy from some Britannians, and he almost accidentally geasses them, but then he like, blinks, and it's clear he's trying to stop the geass.

But the thing is - he's emotionally distracted. Stressed. Absorbed in this SAZ thing, and his plan.

Which involves his own death.

He had noticed that the geass would do that eventually. He'd learned that lesson from Mao. He'd just never intended to live long enough for that to happen. And it's implied that C.C. believed - and had told him - that such a thing would likely be years away.

Also, when C.C. has that attack when she's talking with Suzaku, it affects Lelouch as well. That happened because of Lelouch's geass going permanent. And... if I remember correctly... you see V.V. there for a moment, just his smile. So it might be possible that he and Charles did something to make it activate early.

As for the joke, yeah, it wasn't even funny to begin with; yes, it was an unfortunate coincidence; but was it out of character for Lelouch to make a joke like that when he's emotionally compromised? No, it's not.

Also, three people constantly knock him off balance emotionally. Nunnally, Suzaku, and Euphie. If he'd been allowed to have a positive, open, balanced time with any of them, he'd have been able to do so much more.

And... I don't really know where you're getting this whole, "It's about how life is beyond anyone's control" thing.... that's sort of the opposite of what it is. If there's any theme along those lines, it's the opposite, it's that by being emotionally calm and not letting anger or fear get control, a person can change the world. Lelouch acted irrationally at times because he was afraid - something that he shares with every human being, something that can't be stopped with denial, only with facing his fears. And in the end, he gets to the point where he can do that - where he has Suzaku by his side - but too late, since they've already lost Euphie and Nunnally (so they think).

This show is about human emotions, and how complex they are. It's so well done, but it's easy to think it doesn't make any sense if you don't try to understand what all of the characters are feeling.
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Posted 8/18/17 , edited 8/19/17
The scene might have been a bit contrived, but I think it fit quite well in the theme of the series. We knew his power would go out of control at some point, and knowing Lelouch, it would go out of control at the worst possible time. The results led to tragedy and trauma, and moved the plot along nicely. No shark jumping at all.

Lelouch guarded the secret of his power carefully, but he fully trusted Euphy at that point. She was keeping his other secrets, after all.
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Posted 8/18/17 , edited 8/19/17

LavenderMintRose wrote:

First point - besides Mao and when C.C. was talking to Suzaku, there was also the part earlier in that episode, when Shirley was following Lulu, and he stops and saves some guy from some Britannians, and he almost accidentally geasses them, but then he like, blinks, and it's clear he's trying to stop the geass.


If I'm remembering this scene correctly, Lelouch didn't stop his geass because it activated accidentally, he did it because Rivalz walked in front of him. He was in the process of telling a dude that he should go die in a ditch somewhere, and near the end Rivalz stepped in between them trying to break them up, facing Lelouch. If Lelouch hadn't stopped himself, he probably would've ended up killing Rivalz as well, so he held himself back.
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Posted 10/1/17 , edited 10/1/17
I think if you look at it as if it was the writers trying to portray how Lelouch accept's defeat and how he was willing to show the world his true identity etc... and maybe the fact that Euphy may have been his first love or that she was the first to guess it was him, that he so carelessly forgot how strong his Geass was and tried to make a joke in light of the situation they were at and it just turned upside down for him than it makes a little sense but... well thats what makes the show so emotional i guess
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Posted 10/1/17 , edited 10/1/17
No.

just keep watching.
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Posted 11/9/17 , edited 11/10/17
Closed because OP nuked
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