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Post Reply How to End the Gender Death Gap
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777 / The White House
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Posted 8/28/17 , edited 8/29/17

Blondiefesser wrote:


dreamnarcotic wrote:

Hire moar trannies.


That is so transphobic


Will posting a picture of a Tranny help?

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Posted 8/29/17 , edited 8/29/17

Rujikin wrote:

Edit: Oh look I got reported for telling the Truth. Lets trigger some more shall we?


Let's not. Your original post, though reported, had a good chance of being left alone. However, when you continue to make it clear, just a few days after returning from a ban, that your main interest is in baiting, I see no reason for leaving it, or your subsequent edits in place.
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Posted 8/29/17 , edited 8/29/17
This is, relatively speaking, a non-issue.
It stems from job selection.
You could say that it became a stereotype that males are more prominent in the labor industry than females.
Societal expectations create a vacuum where the stereotype becomes fact.
Labor positions are more likely to be dangerous or life-threatening than an office job or one behind a desk in some capacity (of course).

It's simple to understand and a little silly/absurd to try to make it into a driving point.
You would have to isolate the roots of why this exists and attack from there by manipulating the two points (societal expectations + gender stereotypes).
As it stands, people are bickering more about non-issues that can be resolved by tackling the aforementioned points.
Changing or manipulating societal expectations and the gender stereotypes would cause a shift in both the "wage gap" and "occupational death gap" in the long-term.

Easy to understand, difficult to implement.
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Posted 8/29/17 , edited 8/29/17
oh my gosh a short video suitable for my short attention span! not to mention funny.

I don't see why not, maybe if we also shove some of the men into the women only work force, he could get a date each weekend and be the talk of the office the next day. when I call for assistance for something, I always get a female, last I checked men knew how to answer phones as well. and why can't a female install cable, we probably wouldn't stop to do manicures (yup, all my male cable installing people have manicures). so why not. now, look into this all you modern feminists out there, I am a traditional feminist I believe in equal rights, etc for all females, I don't pick and choose what I want or what suits me best.
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Posted 8/30/17 , edited 8/30/17

Cydoemus wrote:

This is, relatively speaking, a non-issue.
It stems from job selection.
You could say that it became a stereotype that males are more prominent in the labor industry than females.
Societal expectations create a vacuum where the stereotype becomes fact.
Labor positions are more likely to be dangerous or life-threatening than an office job or one behind a desk in some capacity (of course).

It's simple to understand and a little silly/absurd to try to make it into a driving point.
You would have to isolate the roots of why this exists and attack from there by manipulating the two points (societal expectations + gender stereotypes).
As it stands, people are bickering more about non-issues that can be resolved by tackling the aforementioned points.
Changing or manipulating societal expectations and the gender stereotypes would cause a shift in both the "wage gap" and "occupational death gap" in the long-term.

Easy to understand, difficult to implement.


I don't see the wage gap changing anytime nor should it matter at an individual basis. I remember a study that compared the salary between a male Harvard grad and a female Havard grad. Both had the same salary up until there thirties where the female earned less.

One of the reasons were, highly educated females marry men at their education and socio-economic level. Second, they work less to be able to rear children while the male counterpart became the provider and worked more hours.
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26 / F / PA, USA
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Posted 8/30/17 , edited 8/30/17
Nice charts. I have a blue pacman stuck in my head now, thanks.


EDIT; Industrial electrician here, and doing my best to close the death gap. *zapping and frying sounds*
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Posted 8/30/17 , edited 8/30/17

riverjustice wrote:
I don't see the wage gap changing anytime nor should it matter at an individual basis. I remember a study that compared the salary between a male Harvard grad and a female Havard grad. Both had the same salary up until there thirties where the female earned less.

One of the reasons were, highly educated females marry men at their education and socio-economic level. Second, they work less to be able to rear children while the male counterpart became the provider and worked more hours.


Nor do I, to be frank.
When it comes down to marriage, child bearing, and some of the other scenarios you've listed, I would label these as "societal expectations".
Of course, not all females (or males) wish to reproduce which causes exceptions to this way of thinking.
However, society expects one to wed, purchase a house, reproduce, get promoted, retire, and die (eventually).
These are the "cornerstones" of what one should do in their life from the perspective of the common person.
As I stated: "Easy to understand, difficult to implement."
Whether or not it would matter on an individual level or not is (somewhat) subjective and debatable, depending on how you're looking at the situation.

When it comes to the "death gap" (as per OP), it falls mostly onto gender stereotypes.
For example, while you may see women on construction sites they aren't often the one doing the manual labor portion.
They're either the architects (still a small percentage), accountant (budgeting the project) or in an administrative position.
Other than architect/engineering (which data shows that women are less likely to enter STEM-based fields anyways), accountancy and administration are "stereotypically" female roles.
Both wage/death gaps are from the same root causes, on a fundamental level, is what I'm trying to say.
Women have the opportunity to expand into more dangerous, labor-extensive roles (and some do) but most of them will stick to positions that aren't dangerous enough to yield a significantly higher chance of death or harm.

It's immaterial.
Some argue that the wage gap needs to be abolished but it's only been proven at a relatively high level (management or executive positions).
As for the death gap, the stereotype indicates that females are weaker (biology states this too, but only to the extent that it's more difficult for a woman to obtain the same amount of strength as a male - not impossible, just difficult).
Because of the stereotypes, women tend to go to roles that are less physically demanding.
Another professional where women are more likely to jump into than men would be education (especially elementary/grade school level).
There are dozens of examples as to where women, mostly, follow the expected norm.
STEM is becoming more common for females to get into, yet they're not necessarily dangerous jobs either.
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Posted 8/31/17 , edited 9/1/17

men are more willing to take risks-- it's nothing new

and yes, we need more women in policing, firefighting, constructions, military, etc..






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Posted 8/31/17 , edited 9/1/17
good photo on that last one
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